Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Probably my coding isn't so good and some lines wouldn't make much sense or are not necessary, but the code purpose is dead-simple:

I want to create a function that uses an input(string), and convert it as an integer, which is going to be use in a math problem. Plus: I want my code to interpret a random generated number and print it as its string equivalent:

### 'one' --> 1
### 'zero' --> 0 

import random

##'one' == 1
##'zero' == 0

def name_to_number(name):
    if name == 'one':
        return 1

def number_to_name(comp_number):
    if comp_number == 1:
        return 'one'

def lit_for_num(name):
    '''(str) -> str'''

    comp_number = random.randrange(0,1)
    equation = (abs(comp_number - int(name)))
    if equation == 0:
        print('Hallo!')
        return 'Computer draws' + comp_number
    else:
        return 'Computer draws 0'

Any help is very much thanked.

share|improve this question
    
name isn't defined in lit_for_num, but you use it in int(name). Did you mean int(guess) instead? – nneonneo Oct 21 '12 at 2:00
    
Yeah you are right... I just fixed it – Gary J. Espitia S. Oct 21 '12 at 2:03
    
...does it still crash? – nneonneo Oct 21 '12 at 2:03
    
@GaryJ.EspitiaS. Seems to me you wanted to call name_to_number(name) instead of int(name) if your input is one. The reasons you are seeing the error is because your input is one and hence int('one') will give you that error. – K Z Oct 21 '12 at 2:04
    
I see, this actually fixes it... but now I have the query... that it seems that it always throws the else condition... – Gary J. Espitia S. Oct 21 '12 at 2:12
up vote 2 down vote accepted

The first problem is that you seem to be using one as input, and hence int('one') will give you that error.

Secondly, in:

comp_number = random.randrange(0,1)
...
if equation == 0:
    print('Hallo!')
    return 'Computer draws' + comp_number
else:
    return 'Computer draws 0'

the else clause will always be called because comp_number is always 0.

rand.randrange is similar to choice(range(start, stop, step)), which means randrange(0,1) will always return 0. You would want randrange(0,2) instead if you want to either 0 or 1. Or, use random.randint(0,1) instead, which will include end points 0 and 1.

As a bonus, to process text number to number, you may want to consider text2num written by Greg Hewgill.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your response, I feel a bit silly for not knowing this kind of functions' details. – Gary J. Espitia S. Oct 21 '12 at 2:56
    
@GaryJ.EspitiaS. You are welcome! It sure has bitten me when I was learning too -- that's how I know :) – K Z Oct 21 '12 at 2:57

The code below works just fine with me. All I had to do was change return 'Computer draws'+comp_number with return 'Computer draws'+str(comp_number) as well as random.randrange(0,1) to random.randrange(0,2).

### 'one' --> 1
### 'zero' --> 0 

import random

##'one' == 1
##'zero' == 0

def name_to_number(name):
    if name == 'one':
        return 1

def number_to_name(comp_number):
    if comp_number == 1:
        return 'one'

def lit_for_num(name):
    '''(str) -> str'''

    comp_number = random.randrange(0,1)
    equation = (abs(comp_number - int(name)))
    if equation == 0:
        print('Hallo!')
        return 'Computer draws' + str(comp_number)
    else:
        return 'Computer draws 0'
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.