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Unexpected feature in a Python list of lists

I want to make a list of lists in Python, but apparently this doesn't work, as changing one number changes several. Why is this, and how can I fix it?

>>> a = [[0]*3]*4
>>> a[0][0] = 1
>>> a
[[1, 0, 0], [1, 0, 0], [1, 0, 0], [1, 0, 0]]
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marked as duplicate by Mark Tolonen, wim, Paul S., jamylak, Martijn Pieters Oct 21 '12 at 14:36

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3  
Dont use *. It makes copies. Use list comprehension instead –  mshsayem Oct 21 '12 at 2:06
    
What's the syntax for that? –  Paul S. Oct 21 '12 at 2:07
    
@MarkTolonen Yup, I've voted to close this question. –  Paul S. Oct 21 '12 at 2:26

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

What you've discovered is a classic Python pitfall.

x = [0]*3 is a list. No problem there, but [x]*4 creates a list with 4 references to the exact same list x. So modifying the first element, x, also modifies the other elements as well.

Instead, if you do this:

In [193]: a = [[0]*3 for i in range(4)]

then you get 4 distinct items in the list:

In [194]: a[0][0] = 1

In [195]: a
Out[195]: [[1, 0, 0], [0, 0, 0], [0, 0, 0], [0, 0, 0]]
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1  
+1 for a good description. –  Blender Oct 21 '12 at 2:12
1  
StackOverflow needs the ability to bookmark an answer. This is a prime example for why. –  Jonathan Vanasco Oct 21 '12 at 2:23
    
@JonathanVanasco: Star the question. –  nneonneo Oct 21 '12 at 2:34
    
I starred the question. I want to star the answer. –  Jonathan Vanasco Oct 21 '12 at 2:45

In Python, [x]*n creates a new list with n references to x. This is perfectly good to have if x is immutable (string, tuple, etc.), but it gets rather confusing if x is mutable since changes to one element affect x, and thus appear to affect all elements of the list.

So, the solution is to use a list comprehension to create n new things:

[x for _ in xrange(n)] # we use _ here as a "dummy variable"

In your case, it would look like

a = [[0]*3 for _ in xrange(4)]
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Dont use *. Use list comprehension and create like:

>>> a = [[0 for i in range(3)] for j in range(4)]
>>> a[0][0] = 1
>>> a
[[1, 0, 0], [0, 0, 0], [0, 0, 0], [0, 0, 0]]

See unutbu and nneonneo's answer for better explanation.

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2  
Actually, it would be nice if * made copies. The correct thing to say is that it does not make copies, only extra references. –  nneonneo Oct 21 '12 at 2:17
    
hmm, I have read your answer; nice. Removed the statement. –  mshsayem Oct 21 '12 at 2:19

When using * in list's it creates copies, so when you do a[0][0]=1 all other sub-list's copy this.

In order to fix this, use a generator expression to create your list.

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Actually, the problem is that it doesn't make copies, not that it does. –  kindall Oct 21 '12 at 4:23

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