Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Im writing a simple text-editor program in the console window with C++. I have a while loop that is constantly looping and checking if up, down, left, right, or backspace is pressed. the direction keys move the position of the cursor, the backspace key deletes the character at that location.

**My question is: Is there a way I can put a condition such that if ANY key is pressed, it takes that key and prints it at the current cursor location. Like for example, if they press the 'a' key, an 'a' is printed to the console window

Heres the loop

    while (pressedEscape == false) {
        if (GetAsyncKeyState(VK_UP))
            moveUp(position);
        else if (GetAsyncKeyState(VK_DOWN)) 
            moveDown(position);
        else if (GetAsyncKeyState(VK_LEFT))
            moveLeft(position);
        else if (GetAsyncKeyState(VK_RIGHT))
            moveRight(position);
        else if (GetAsyncKeyState(VK_BACK))
            deleteChar();
        else if (GetAsyncKeyState(VK_ESCAPE))
            pressedEscape = true;
        else if (GetAsyncKeyState(0x43) || GetAsyncKeyState(0x63))
            system("cls");

        gotoxy(position.x, position.y);

        SetConsoleTextAttribute(GetStdHandle(STD_OUTPUT_HANDLE), 7);

        Sleep(100);
    }

So what id like is another else if condition like:

    else if (Any key is pressed) {
         print that key to the screen
    }

How can i do this?

share|improve this question
    
You should bitand your GetAsyncKeyState results with 0x8000. The most significant bit is the one that represents whether the key is down. –  chris Oct 21 '12 at 4:10
    
Im sorry im new to programming, significant bit? and What do i put as the argument for GetAsyncKeyState() when you bitAND it? –  Steve Patterson Oct 21 '12 at 4:28
1  
It's the leftmost bit. For example, in an 8-bit 10110010, it's 1, but in 00110010, it's 0. Since GetAsyncKeyState uses a 16-bit return, the mask for the left bit is 1000000000000000, or, more concisely, 0x8000. Therefore, whether a key is down would be checked like if (GetAsyncKeyState(vkCode) & 0x8000). In case you wonder where I got that it's that bit, look at the MSDN docs: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/… –  chris Oct 21 '12 at 4:33
    
Alright I understand that thanks, is there anyway to detect when any key is pressed? And then just take the key's value of the one pressed? That way I dont have to write an if statement for every possible letter input? –  Steve Patterson Oct 21 '12 at 4:44
    
Well, there is GetKeyboardState, though I haven't had much luck with it. You can loop through VK codes. –  chris Oct 21 '12 at 5:16
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.