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Is it possible to write a effective pointcut that matches a method that changes a class variable of a specific class type? The point of doing this is that my classes have a lastModificationDate that I want to update to the latest date whenever a class variable is changed.

Example of method:

public void stupidMethod() {

 ...
 for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++) this.var = whatever;
 ...
} <--- I want to match here

Currently I have this, but it is not very optimal:

after(SimpleEntity entity) : set(* *.*) && target(entity) && !within(SimpleEntityAspect)
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I know this one is old, but still listed as unanswered. Would you please accept and upvote my answer if it seems appropriate? Thanks. –  kriegaex Jun 9 '14 at 12:09

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

No. getand set pointcuts exist for members only, but not for local variables. Consequently, your example will only match member variable assignments for SimpleEntity objects. If this is what you want to do, please rephrase your question's heading and content so as to make clear what you really want to achieve. Please also provide some more code context, such as e.g. the relevant part of the type declaration for SimpleEntity.

My best guess for now is that you want to match the exit point of methods in which a certain type's members are changed. If you also tell us what exactly you want to do in your advice (e.g. print the method name or the assigned value etc.), we might be able to better help you.


Update: Okay, I have found a solution which does what you want, using pertarget aspect instantiation plus ITD (inter-type declaration). I have not tested performance or memory consumption, I am leaving that up to you.

Sample entity class:

public class SimpleEntity {
    private static int currentId = 1;

    private int id;
    private String name;
    private long lastModification;

    public SimpleEntity(String name) {
        this.id = currentId++;
        this.name = name;
    }

    public void stupidMethod(final int count) {
        for (int i = 0; i < count; i++)
            name = name.replaceFirst("_[0-9]+$", "") + "_" + i;
    }

    public int tripleValue(final int value) {
        return 3 * value;
    }

    @Override
    public String toString() {
        return "SimpleEntity [id=" + id + ", name=" + name + ", lastModification=" + lastModification + "]";
    }
}

Sample application class creating and using entities:

public class Application {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        SimpleEntity entity1 = new SimpleEntity("Adam");
        entity1.stupidMethod(3);
        entity1.tripleValue(11);
        entity1.stupidMethod(3);
        SimpleEntity entity2 = new SimpleEntity("Eve");
        entity2.stupidMethod(3);
        entity1.tripleValue(22);
        entity2.stupidMethod(3);
    }
}

Aspect doing what was requested by Piotr Blasiak:

public privileged aspect SetterCallingMethodAspect pertarget(entitySetter(SimpleEntity)) {
    private static interface MemberChangeDetector {}
    private boolean MemberChangeDetector.changed;

    declare parents : SimpleEntity implements MemberChangeDetector;

    pointcut entitySetter(SimpleEntity entity) :
        set (* SimpleEntity+.*) && target(entity) && !within(SetterCallingMethodAspect);
    pointcut constructorExecution() :
        execution(*.new(..)) && !cflow(adviceexecution());
    pointcut methodExecution() :
        execution(* *(..)) && !cflow(adviceexecution());

    after(SimpleEntity entity) : entitySetter(entity) {
        entity.changed = true;
        System.out.println(this + ",  " + thisJoinPointStaticPart + "  ->  " + entity);
    }

    after(SimpleEntity entity) : if(entity.changed) && target(entity)
        && (constructorExecution() || methodExecution())
    {
        entity.changed = false;
        entity.lastModification = System.nanoTime();
        System.out.println(
            this + ",  " + thisJoinPointStaticPart +
            "  ->  update lastModification to " + entity.lastModification
        );
    }
}

Sample console output:

SetterCallingMethodAspect@bb6ab6,  set(int SimpleEntity.id)  ->  SimpleEntity [id=1, name=null, lastModification=0]
SetterCallingMethodAspect@bb6ab6,  set(String SimpleEntity.name)  ->  SimpleEntity [id=1, name=Adam, lastModification=0]
SetterCallingMethodAspect@bb6ab6,  execution(SimpleEntity(String))  ->  update lastModification to 1863715110885880
SetterCallingMethodAspect@bb6ab6,  set(String SimpleEntity.name)  ->  SimpleEntity [id=1, name=Adam_0, lastModification=1863715110885880]
SetterCallingMethodAspect@bb6ab6,  set(String SimpleEntity.name)  ->  SimpleEntity [id=1, name=Adam_1, lastModification=1863715110885880]
SetterCallingMethodAspect@bb6ab6,  set(String SimpleEntity.name)  ->  SimpleEntity [id=1, name=Adam_2, lastModification=1863715110885880]
SetterCallingMethodAspect@bb6ab6,  execution(void SimpleEntity.stupidMethod(int))  ->  update lastModification to 1863715112627443
SetterCallingMethodAspect@bb6ab6,  set(String SimpleEntity.name)  ->  SimpleEntity [id=1, name=Adam_0, lastModification=1863715112627443]
SetterCallingMethodAspect@bb6ab6,  set(String SimpleEntity.name)  ->  SimpleEntity [id=1, name=Adam_1, lastModification=1863715112627443]
SetterCallingMethodAspect@bb6ab6,  set(String SimpleEntity.name)  ->  SimpleEntity [id=1, name=Adam_2, lastModification=1863715112627443]
SetterCallingMethodAspect@bb6ab6,  execution(void SimpleEntity.stupidMethod(int))  ->  update lastModification to 1863715114328497
SetterCallingMethodAspect@12d03f9,  set(int SimpleEntity.id)  ->  SimpleEntity [id=2, name=null, lastModification=0]
SetterCallingMethodAspect@12d03f9,  set(String SimpleEntity.name)  ->  SimpleEntity [id=2, name=Eve, lastModification=0]
SetterCallingMethodAspect@12d03f9,  execution(SimpleEntity(String))  ->  update lastModification to 1863715120762834
SetterCallingMethodAspect@12d03f9,  set(String SimpleEntity.name)  ->  SimpleEntity [id=2, name=Eve_0, lastModification=1863715120762834]
SetterCallingMethodAspect@12d03f9,  set(String SimpleEntity.name)  ->  SimpleEntity [id=2, name=Eve_1, lastModification=1863715120762834]
SetterCallingMethodAspect@12d03f9,  set(String SimpleEntity.name)  ->  SimpleEntity [id=2, name=Eve_2, lastModification=1863715120762834]
SetterCallingMethodAspect@12d03f9,  execution(void SimpleEntity.stupidMethod(int))  ->  update lastModification to 1863715121338606
SetterCallingMethodAspect@12d03f9,  set(String SimpleEntity.name)  ->  SimpleEntity [id=2, name=Eve_0, lastModification=1863715121338606]
SetterCallingMethodAspect@12d03f9,  set(String SimpleEntity.name)  ->  SimpleEntity [id=2, name=Eve_1, lastModification=1863715121338606]
SetterCallingMethodAspect@12d03f9,  set(String SimpleEntity.name)  ->  SimpleEntity [id=2, name=Eve_2, lastModification=1863715121338606]
SetterCallingMethodAspect@12d03f9,  execution(void SimpleEntity.stupidMethod(int))  ->  update lastModification to 1863715121829729
share|improve this answer
    
kriegaex thank you, indeed I was not very clear and I did mean class variables/fields and not local variables - silly mistake. Your assumption is correct - exit point of methods in which a certain type's members are changed is what I am looking to target. Is this possible? –  Piotr Blasiak Oct 22 '12 at 13:08
    
Think about it for a moment: If stupidMethod belongs to SimpleEntity and is non-static, you have a way of referring to this, but what if a member variable is changed from outside the defining class or by a static class method? How can you refer to the entity in a general way without knowing context, e.g. which method parameter or member of the other class it is assigned to? And even if you are inside a non-static method of the defining class, how can you know that it does not change another object's properties of the same class, e.g while cloning objects? –  kriegaex Nov 4 '12 at 8:29
    
You could keep internal aspect state (something like boolean entityChanged) after a setter call and only execute the timestamp update after each method/constructor execution in combination with if(entityChanged) pointcut, but probably keeping the state (including probably a reference to the previously changed entity) would make your code more complex and slow it down considerably. You probably would also need a perthis instatiation for the aspect etc. You should rather stick with just intercepting the setters and updating them each time they are called. –  kriegaex Nov 4 '12 at 9:00
    
If you know your code well and it is clean, e.g. member variables are all private and only written to from within the defining class (preferably using setter methods), you can more easily intercept the setter method executions and/or direct variable accesses. There is always a way to achieve what you want, but in this case (like so often) it heavily depends on your exact context and purpose. If I knew your complete code I could probably come up with a better recommendation. –  kriegaex Nov 4 '12 at 9:03
    
Okay, I found a solution. See my updated answer above. –  kriegaex Nov 4 '12 at 10:05

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