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Does setting and getting an object attribute using reflection (java.lang.reflect.Field get and set functions) rather than calling the set and get of the object itself, result in any significant performance differences?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Yes - absolutely. Looking up a class via reflection is, by magnitude, more expensive.
Quoting from Java Documentation

Because reflection involves types that are dynamically resolved, certain Java virtual machine optimizations can not be performed. Consequently, reflective operations have slower performance than their non-reflective counterparts, and should be avoided in sections of code which are called frequently in performance-sensitive applications

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Yes, the benchmark is easy to write in 15 minutes.

Generated code is better, even if you cache the reflective accessors, I have tried it.

Here it is under Java 7 64 bits:

import java.lang.reflect.Field;

class Data {
   public double _value;
   public double getValue()               { return _value; }
   public void   setValue( double value ) { _value = value; }
}

public class Reflect {
   public static final int LOOP_COUNT = 100_000_000;
   public static void main( String[] args ) throws Throwable {
      Data d = new Data();
      long start = System.currentTimeMillis();
      for( int i = 0; i < LOOP_COUNT; ++i ) {
         d.setValue( i );
      }
      System.err.println( System.currentTimeMillis() - start );
      Field field = Data.class.getDeclaredField( "_value" );
      start = System.currentTimeMillis();
      for( int i = 0; i < LOOP_COUNT; ++i ) {
         field.set( d, new Double( i ));
      }
      System.err.println( System.currentTimeMillis() - start );

      field.setAccessible( true ); // Optimization
      start = System.currentTimeMillis();
      for( int i = 0; i < LOOP_COUNT; ++i ) {
         field.set( d, new Double( i ));
      }
      System.err.println( System.currentTimeMillis() - start );
   }
}

Result:

20
37381
1677

Ratio is near 1870 w/o accessible flag set. Setting it makes ratio drop to 83.

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What the!!? Does that compile? The integer literal with underscores? –  Martijn Courteaux Oct 21 '12 at 8:46
1  
I see. It is a Java 7 feature. Nice. docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/technotes/guides/language/… –  Martijn Courteaux Oct 21 '12 at 8:48
    
your benchmark shows how Java JIT can optimize tight loops, not getter/setter performance. –  danbst Jul 30 at 19:31
1  
Nice benchmark. Inspired by this blog entry added field.setAccessible(true); before the loop and ratio went down from 1870 to 83 -> this sets the reflection in different light already. –  botchniaque Oct 13 at 6:58
    
Thanks botchniaque, I have commited your suggestion. Nice to know. –  Aubin Oct 13 at 18:41

Yes it does make a significant performance difference, and there are lots on benchmarking results on the web to support this.

For example: http://www.cowtowncoder.com/blog/archives/2007/02/entry_32.html - which seems to be saying that a reflective call to a get or set method is ~50 times slower than accessing / updating the field directly. (And getting / setting using Field methods is slower still.)

Now these results are rather old, and (apparently) the performance of reflection has been improved in recent HotSpot JVMs. Even so, a rough rule of thumb is "an order of magnitude or more slower".

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