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I am reading the book: C: In a Nutshell, and after reading the section Character Sets, which talks about wide characters, I wrote this program:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stddef.h>
#include <wchar.h>

int main() {
  wchar_t wc = '\x3b1';
  wprintf(L"%lc\n", wc);
  return 0;
}

I then compiled it using gcc, but gcc gave me this warning:

main.c:7:15: warning: hex escape sequence out of range [enabled by default]

And the program does not output the character α (whose unicode is U+03B1), which is what I wanted it to do.

How do I change the program to print the character α?

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1  
wchar_t wc = L'\x03b1'; eliminates the warning, though it still doesn't print an alpha. –  user529758 Oct 21 '12 at 8:11
1  
What I actually want is not to eliminate the warning, but get the right answer. :-( –  Yishu Fang Oct 21 '12 at 8:13
    
Where are you printing to? If a terminal, what encoding is your terminal set to convert from? –  Charles Bailey Oct 21 '12 at 8:16

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This works for me

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stddef.h>
#include <wchar.h>
#include <locale.h>

int main(void) {
  wchar_t wc = L'\x3b1';

  setlocale(LC_ALL, "en_US.UTF-8");
  wprintf(L"%lc\n", wc);
  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
This also works for me. :-) –  Yishu Fang Oct 21 '12 at 9:05
    
You can change LC_ALL by LC_CTYPE (This category applies to classification and conversion of characters, and to multibyte and wide characters) –  Alter Mann Oct 21 '12 at 9:17
    
This does not work on Windows; the locale name is different, and console does not speak UTF-8 by default. –  rubenvb Oct 21 '12 at 9:47
1  
I know, but he is working on Ubuntu, do you suggest other than a conditional compilation? –  Alter Mann Oct 21 '12 at 10:03
1  
You could use setlocale(LC_ALL, "") to use the locale configured in the execution environment, be it Linux or Windows. –  Joni Oct 21 '12 at 16:42
wchar_t wc = L'\x3b1';

is the correct way to initialise a wchar_t variable to U+03B1. The L prefix is used to specify a wchar_t literal. Your code defines a char literal and that's why the compiler is warning.

The fact that you don't see the desired character when printing is down to your local environment's console settings.

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Emmmm, how to set my console? –  Yishu Fang Oct 21 '12 at 8:21
1  
I've got no idea. You didn't state what OS you are on. Also, you didn't ask about that. You asked about how to initialise the variable. –  David Heffernan Oct 21 '12 at 8:24
    
I am using Ubuntu linux, can you get the right result on your computer? I was just thinking that the problem is caused by the initialization, I have never thought about the environment before. –  Yishu Fang Oct 21 '12 at 8:27
    
Your environment almost certainly prefers UTF-8. Use char* instead and encode using UTF-8, that is 0xCE 0xB1. Print with printf. –  David Heffernan Oct 21 '12 at 8:31
1  
@rubenv No, \x3b1 is the same value no matter what the endianness is. If it was as you said, the entire language would be utterly useless. –  David Heffernan Oct 21 '12 at 9:45

try L'\x03B1' It might just solve your problem. IF you're in doubt you can try :

'\u03b1' to initialize.
share|improve this answer
    
No. I tried this and this didn't work. –  user529758 Oct 21 '12 at 8:18
    
The leading zero is not necessary. A hexadecimal escape sequence can contain any positive number of hexadecimal digits. –  Charles Bailey Oct 21 '12 at 8:22
    
@H2C03 what didn't work. Please try to be precise. –  David Heffernan Oct 21 '12 at 8:22
    
@H2CO3 if you're having trouble try to write it to a unicode file, and then read it back. I tried with L'\x03B1' and '\u03B1' both work. –  Aniket Oct 21 '12 at 9:08
    
@PrototypeStark Obviously I've tried that as well. –  user529758 Oct 21 '12 at 9:43

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