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Ubuntu version:12.04 Python version:2.7.3

I have a script (prawn.py) that starts out:

#! /usr/bin/env python
from random import choice
import os
from webbrowser import open_new
import urllib
print("!")
def getsource(url): page=urllib.urlopen(url);sourcecodey=page.read();page.close;return sourcecodey
#etc

When I run it in terminal:

$ ./prawn.py
: No such file or directory

When I change the firstline to #! /usr/bin/python

$ which python
/usr/bin/python
$ ./prawn.py
bash: ./prawn.py: /usr/bin/python^M: bad interpreter: No such file or directory

But when I run it using "python prawn.py", it works.

How do I fix this?

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3 Answers 3

The ^M indicates you're using DOS line endings. Use UNIX line endings instead. You can try to transform your file from DOS line endings to UNIX line endings using sed like this:

sed -E 's/\'$'\r''$//' < prawn.py > prawn.unix.py

The converted file will be in prawn.unix.py.

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Thank you so much! I forgot I wrote this on Windows. I did it the longer way before I saw your edit –  Property404 Oct 21 '12 at 8:32
3  
if dos2unix is installed, using it would be easier than that sed call. –  GreenMatt Jan 31 at 14:28

It is essentially the same error: your shebang line ends with a Carriage Return \r/^M. env prints that out (it prints python, it does a carriage return and prints at the beginning of the line : No such file or directory.

If you call python directly, python^M is not found.

For both cases, remove that extra character; the version with env is the better one once you made it work.

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It seems there is an ^M in your shebang line, delele all the content of your first line, then retype it (#!/usr/bin/env python) by hand.

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