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Here is the code that i have written for finding prime numbers between a range where the upper bound can be as big as 1000000000.I have used Hashmap and have not stored any even number except 2 and havent stored sero and one as well.But still when I run this code with input lb = 1 and ub =1000000000,it gives runtime error,(out of memory).Please help

Here is my code :-

import java.util.HashMap;
import java.util.Iterator;

import java.util.Scanner;

class Samp {

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        Scanner sc = new Scanner(System.in);
        int t, limit, m, n;
        double lb, ub, c;

        t = sc.nextInt();
        while (t > 0) {
            c = 3;
        HashMap<Integer, Boolean> primeflags = new HashMap<Integer, Boolean>();
            primeflags.put(2, true);
            lb = sc.nextDouble();
            ub = sc.nextDouble();
            while (c <= ub) {
                primeflags.put((int) c, true);
                c = c + 2;
            }
            limit = (int) Math.sqrt(ub);

            for (m = 2; m <= limit; m++) {

                for (n = m * m; n <= ub; n += m) {

                    if (primeflags.containsKey(n))
                        primeflags.remove(n);
                }

            }
            Iterator<Integer> iterator = primeflags.keySet().iterator();
            while (iterator.hasNext()) {  
                   Integer key = (Integer) iterator.next(); 

                   if(key >= lb)
                   System.out.println(key); 
                }



            --t;

        }
       sc.close();
     }    
}

ok after recieving the answers ,I coded this : But still it is giving TLE

import java.util.BitSet;
import java.util.Scanner;
public class Prime {
    private static BitSet bitSet = new BitSet(1000);
    private static int max = 3;

      public static boolean isPrime(int n) {
          if(n == 2)
                      return true;
          if(n < 3 || n % 2 == 0)
               return false;
          if(n <= max)
              return !bitSet.get(n / 2);
          for(int i = 3; i <= n; i += 2) {
              if(i * 2 > n)
                 break;
              if(!bitSet.get(i / 2)) {
                  int multiple = max / i;
                  multiple *= i;
                  if(multiple <= i)
                multiple = i * 2;
                  clearMultiple(i, multiple, n);  
              }
          }
          max = n;
          return !bitSet.get(n / 2);
      }

    private static void clearMultiple(int prime, int multiple, int max) {
        while(multiple <= max) {
                    setNotPrime(multiple);
                    multiple += prime;
                   }

    }

    private static  void setNotPrime(int n) {

        if(n % 2 == 0)
             return;
              bitSet.set(n / 2, true);
}     


    public static void getPrimeGreaterOrEqual(int n,int upperbound) {
            // make sure we start with an odd number
        if( n == 1 || n == 0){
            System.out.println(2);
            n = 3;
        }    
    if(n % 2 == 0 && n != 2)
                    ++n;
                // loop until we found one
                    while(n <= upperbound) {
                //if the number is registered as prime return it
                if(isPrime(n))
                       System.out.println(n);
                       // else check next one
                        n += 2;


               }  
            }

    public static void main(String args[])
    {
        Scanner sc = new Scanner(System.in);
        int t,lb,ub;
         t = sc.nextInt();
        while(t > 0){
            lb = sc.nextInt();
            ub = sc.nextInt();

            getPrimeGreaterOrEqual(lb, ub);

            --t;
       }
       sc.close();
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Further optimization on prime sieving can be done by wheel factorization (check Wikipedia article for it). – nhahtdh Oct 21 '12 at 9:04

Convert your algorithm to use a BitSet instead, and you will see huge performance and memory usage improvements.

You'll find many variants of this algorithm if you search around. You could for instance take a look at this: http://www.dreamincode.net/forums/topic/192554-secret-code-vii-prime-numbers/

share|improve this answer
    
Ah, you beat me! +1 – Martijn Courteaux Oct 21 '12 at 8:49
    
Can u elaborate ? i mean just specify an example – djscribbles Oct 21 '12 at 8:50
    
I was about to say. OH GOD, a hashmap with a billion entries – Wug Oct 21 '12 at 8:50
    
    
@Wug : its less than half of it – djscribbles Oct 21 '12 at 8:54

I have no implementation for Java at hand. I have written the following implementation in C++ and used it to calculate prime numbers up to 1.000.000.000.000:

void sieve(std::size_t bound, std::ostream& os)
{
    using uint_t = unsigned int;
    constexpr auto bits = sizeof(uint_t) * CHAR_BIT;
    auto&& index = [](std::size_t i) { return (i - 3) / 2 / bits; };
    auto&& mask = [](std::size_t i) { return uint_t{1} << ((i - 3) / 2 % bits); };
    auto size = index(bound - 1) + 1;
    std::unique_ptr<uint_t[]> crossed{new uint_t[size]};
    std::fill(crossed.get(), crossed.get() + size, uint_t{0});
    for (std::size_t i = 3; i < bound; i += 2) {
        if ((crossed[index(i)] & mask(i)) == 0) {
            auto q = i * i;
            if (q >= bound) {
                break;
            }
            for (; q < bound; q += i) {
                crossed[index(q)] |= mask(q);
            }
        }
    }
    os << "2\n";
    for (std::size_t i = 3; i < bound; i += 2) {
        if ((crossed[index(i)] & mask(i)) == 0) {
            os << i << '\n';
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This implements a bitset, which reduces the memory needed by 8 times, and further cut off half the memory usage by only considering the bits for odd numbers. – nhahtdh Oct 21 '12 at 9:01
    
It actually cuts memory need by much more than 8 times. More like 100 times (could easily be even more than that). It is one bit against an instance of Map.Entry, Integer and Boolean, plus reference to the Map.Entry, plus more overhead in HashMap, plus... – Marko Topolnik Oct 21 '12 at 9:04
    
@MarkoTopolnik: When compared to HashMap (the OP's method), yes. I wasn't clear that I was comparing with the naive method using 1 byte to represent whether the number is prime (I kinda side track when I wrote the comment). – nhahtdh Oct 21 '12 at 9:09
    
@nhahtdh Heh, if he just implemented your "naive" approach, the saving would already be much more than the saving after stepping over to a bitset :) – Marko Topolnik Oct 21 '12 at 9:11

You can put primenumber after find. So you dont need more memory. And you can run your code with this option. -Xms512M -Xmx2048M

share|improve this answer

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