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I have a data set and would like to fit them to uniform distribution and calculate goodness of fit with Matlab. However, I found that uniform is not included in function 'fitdist'. Is there any method to do uniform distribution fitting in Matlab?

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I was just wondering if my answer was any use to you? If not, please let me know why and perhaps I can improve it. Cheers. –  Colin T Bowers Oct 24 '12 at 0:05
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2 Answers 2

Further to Colin's answer, goodness of fit for uniform distribution can be calculated using a Pearson's chi-squared test.

If you have access to the Matlab stats toolbox you can perform this fairly simply by using the chi2gof function. Example 3 in the documentation shows how to apply it to a uniform distribution.

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When you say you would like to fit the dataset to the uniform, I'm assuming that what you mean is that you would like to estimate the parameters of a uniform distribution that best fit your dataset.

This is actually quite an interesting question. I'm not surprised that fitdist was no help as the uniform distribution is a bit of a special case. For example, it can be shown that under some circumstances, the maximum likelihood estimate of the parameters of a uniform distribution does not exist, and under other circumstances, has no unique solution.

So, what to do? Well, a uniform distribution has two parameters, a and b, which define the lower and upper bound of the density. Let X denote your dataset (say, a column vector of observations). A naive estimator of a and b is:

a = min(X);
b = max(X);

Of course these estimates will over-estimate (for a) and under-estimate (for b) the true parameters almost surely, since it is unlikely that a random sample drawn from the density will fall right on the boundary.

For the case where it is known that a is 0, the minimum variance unbiased estimator of b is:

b = max(X) + (max(X) / length(X))

This estimator is related to the famous German Tank Problem. For the general case, I don't actually know any estimation theory (although I'm sure there must be some). My first guess would be to use the naive min/max estimator, but subtract and add the average distance between the observations in your dataset, ie:

a = min(X) - c;
b = max(X) + c;

where

c = (max(X) - min(X)) / length(X)

As for goodness-of-fit, hopefully someone else on SO knows something, as I'd need to do a fair bit of research myself to answer that. Good Luck!

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Thanks a lot, Colin~ –  Tao Liu Oct 26 '12 at 0:06
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