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I wonder how to put all combinations of 8 bits binary numbers into a two-dimensional array in C programming. 256x8 sized array and all combinations of 0 and 1 should be filled in the array.

From 00000000 to 11111111

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closed as not a real question by Mat, Anteru, Rhino, S.L. Barth, rene Oct 21 '12 at 15:16

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What kind of combination do you mean? And do you mean you want a 256x256 sized array, or something else? Please clarify question! –  hyde Oct 21 '12 at 11:49
    
What? (.......) –  user529758 Oct 21 '12 at 11:49
    
256x8 sized array and all combinations of 0 and 1 should be filled in the array. –  user1759440 Oct 21 '12 at 11:51
    
for loop from 0 to 255 with the y-step for 2d array of 8... –  iccthedral Oct 21 '12 at 11:52

2 Answers 2

This is to get you started:

for(int i=0;i<256;++i) {
    a[0]=i&(1<<0);
    a[1]=i&(1<<1);
    a[2]=i&(1<<2);
    ...
    a[7]=i&(1<<7);
}

The reason why this will result in all combinations is, that when i=0...255 then it will go through all the combinations 00000000...11111111 just in bits, not bytes: so all you have to do is extract the bits into bytes.

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I want it to be something like this: 00000001 00000010 00000011 00000100 00000101 –  user1759440 Oct 21 '12 at 12:08
    
yes, it will be. for example consider what happens when i=3: the bit-representation of 3 is 00000011. so you only have to extract the bits into bytes by using the & (binary and) with a specially shifted "extractor bit" (1<<0 and 1<<1 in this case). –  eznme Oct 21 '12 at 12:14

Because you want to enumerate all possibilities, you can simply use the binary value of your index. Here is a version with an unrolled loop:

for (i = 0; i < 256; ++i) {
    t[i][0] = (i >> 7) & 1;
    t[i][1] = (i >> 6) & 1;
    t[i][2] = (i >> 5) & 1;
    t[i][3] = (i >> 4) & 1;
    t[i][4] = (i >> 3) & 1;
    t[i][5] = (i >> 2) & 1;
    t[i][6] = (i >> 1) & 1;
    t[i][7] = (i >> 0) & 1;
}

Where t is your result array and i a loop index.

The statement t[i][5] = (i >> 2) & 1; (for instance) works as follow:

  • i >> 2 puts the 3e bit of i at the 1e position;
  • (i >> 2) & 1 let us know if the 3e bit of i is either 0 or 1.

Example1:

  • Input: 00001111;
  • i >> 2: 00000011;
  • (i >> 2) & 1: 00000001

Example2:

  • Input: 00001011;
  • i >> 2: 00000010;
  • (i >> 2) & 1: 00000000

Note we can also use a macro to improve readability:

/* Get the value of the bit at position `n` of `x`. */
#define GET_BIT(x, n) (((x) >> (n)) & 1)

for (i = 0; i < 256; ++i) {
    t[i][0] = GET_BIT(i, 7);
    t[i][1] = GET_BIT(i, 6);
    t[i][2] = GET_BIT(i, 5);
    t[i][3] = GET_BIT(i, 4);
    t[i][4] = GET_BIT(i, 3);
    t[i][5] = GET_BIT(i, 2);
    t[i][6] = GET_BIT(i, 1);
    t[i][7] = GET_BIT(i, 0);
}

Example:

#include <stdio.h>

/* Get the value of the bit at position `n` of `x`. */
#define GET_BIT(x, n) (((x) >> (n)) & 1)

int main(void)
{
    int t[256][8], i, j;

    for (i = 0; i < 256; ++i) {
        t[i][0] = GET_BIT(i, 7);
        t[i][1] = GET_BIT(i, 6);
        t[i][2] = GET_BIT(i, 5);
        t[i][3] = GET_BIT(i, 4);
        t[i][4] = GET_BIT(i, 3);
        t[i][5] = GET_BIT(i, 2);
        t[i][6] = GET_BIT(i, 1);
        t[i][7] = GET_BIT(i, 0);
    }

    for (i = 0; i < 256; ++i, puts(""))
        for (j = 0; j < 8; ++j)
            printf("%d", t[i][j]);

    return 0;
}
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Can you please explain what [ (i >> 7) & 1 ] does –  user1759440 Oct 21 '12 at 12:21
    
It gives the value of the 8e bit of i: 0 or 1. –  md5 Oct 21 '12 at 12:24
    
if iam not thinking wrong will t[i][0] = 1 and t[i][1] = 1 ? –  user1759440 Oct 21 '12 at 12:27
    
It depends on the value of i. See the test in my edit. –  md5 Oct 21 '12 at 12:33
    
Could you please explain what happens if i=8. And use this (i >> 2) & 1 –  user1759440 Oct 21 '12 at 12:57

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