Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to paste two values together in a string. One value is an array element and the other a hashmapvalue. But I keep having this error:

Use of uninitialized value in concatenation (.) or string
  at makeNewCSV.pl line 104, <$fh> line 2020.

This is my code:

use feature qq(say);

my @nodeIdArray;
my @sequenceArray;
my @completeLineArray;

my %fastaHash = ();

[...]

sub readCsv{#Reads the CSV and puts all the Node ID's in an array

my ($file) = @_;
my $nodeID = qr{\d+\,(\d+)};

open(my $fh, '<', $file) or die "Error while reading CSV: $!";

    while(my $line = <$fh>){

        if($line =~ $nodeID){

            push(@nodeIdArray, $1);
        }
    }

close($fh);

searchFasta();
}


sub searchFasta{#Reads and searches the fasta file for contigs with a matching node ID

my ($file) = $ARGV[1];
my $fastaNodeID = qr{>NODE_(\d+)_LENGTH_\d+_COV_[\d.]+\n([ACTGN\n]+)};
my @matches;


open(my $fh, '<', $file) or die "Error while reading fasta: $!";

    my @allLines = <$fh>;

    my $makeString = join('', @allLines);
    my $lineAsString = uc($makeString);

    while($lineAsString =~ m/$fastaNodeID/g){

        my $node_ID = $1;
        my $sequence = $2;

        $sequence =~ s/\n//;

        $fastaHash{$node_ID} = $sequence;
    }

close($fh);


pasteLines();
}

sub pasteLines{

my $fullLine = "";
my $file = $ARGV[0];
my @hashKeys = keys(%fastaHash);
my $index = 0;
my $numberOfRepeat = 0;

open(my $fh, '<', $file) or die "Error while reading CSV (2): $!";


    my @allLines = <$fh>;
    my $arrayLength = @allLines;

    foreach my $line(@allLines){

        chomp($line);
    }

    while($numberOfRepeat <= $arrayLength){     

        foreach my $key(@hashKeys){

            if($key = $nodeIdArray[$index]){


                no warnings qw(uninitialized);  #DEBUG:
                say qq(DEBUG: \$fastaHash{$key} = "$fastaHash{$key}");
                say qq(DEBUG: \$fullLine = $allLines[$index] . "," . $fastaHash{$key};);
                use warnings qw(uninitialized);  #DEBUG:


                $fullLine = $allLines[$index] . "," . $fastaHash{$key}; #This line here gives the problems
                push(@completeLineArray, $fullLine);

                $index++;
            }

            else{

                $index++;
            }
        }
    }

close($fh);


}

$index is for looping through the array and @allLines contains all the lines from a read file. (<$fh> is my filehandle).

Edit 22-10-2012: I added the entire code to show where the variables are made

share|improve this question
3  
Well, either the list item is undef or the hash doesn't have a key for that value. I don't really see how we could help you here. –  Mat Oct 21 '12 at 12:28
    
David W. gives you some good debugging ideas below. If you are still having trouble, you will need to post more code, because the problem lies outside those lines: show the code that sets @allLines,$index,%fastaHash, and $key. –  dan1111 Oct 22 '12 at 8:03
    
I just posted more code. I hope this helps understanding my problem –  Tom K. Oct 22 '12 at 9:50

1 Answer 1

Usually, Perl is pretty good at picking the exact line number in undefined issues.

Apparently, somewhere, something you think has a value doesn't. The easiest way to solve this is to simply print out the values before you do anything else. Try this:

use feature qq(say);

[...]

no warnings qw(uninitialized);  #DEBUG:
say qq(DEBUG: \$fastaHash{$key} = "$fastaHash{$key}");
say qq(DEBUG: \$fullLine = $allLines[$index] . "," . $fastaHash{$key};);
use warnings qw(uninitialized);  #DEBUG:
$fullLine = $allLines[$index] . "," . $fastaHash{$key};
push(@completeLineArray, $fullLine);

This will print out the values you're trying to concatenate together in $fullline which is where I believe the error is coming from. The push will work even if @completeLineArray is empty, and if $fullLine is the problem, it would be a problem in the line above anyway.

This is fairly simple to do. Simply copy out the line above and surround it with say qq(DEBUG:) and );. For extra bonus points, you can put a backslash in front of the $ just to make sure you don't have any problems with that.

The say command is available since 5.10, and is nice because I don't have to keep putting the \n at the end of these things which happens a lot because I cut and paste. You have to use the feature pragma in order to get it.

My suspicion is that $key is not a valid key in your %fastahash hash. Saying $fastahash{$key} when $key doesn't exist in your hash will return an undefined value. Since you didn't post much else, I can't say why $key would point to a non-existant value. However, I bet once you start printing out these keys, you'll quickly find the issue.

The no warnings qw(uninitialized) will stop printing out that uninitialized warning. I know that some value will be uninitailized in the DEBUG: statements. That's why I am printing them. However, reenable the uninitialized warnings before your statement, so that you still get that warning. You see that in your output, and you can look for the DEBUG: statements above to see what the issue could be.

After you figure out the problem, you can easily remove the DEBUG: lines with a search and delete.

Now, there are two ways of handling this error once you find it:

Ignore it

Just surround the code with the no warnings qw(uninitialized); and use warnings qw(initialized); statements. It's quick and simple and the program just might be doing what you want anyway. Besides, we all know if you ignore a problem, it just goes away.

Handle the Error

If, what I suspect is that $key is not pointing to a valid key in your array, then you can catch that error and handle it. It might simply be not pushing that value into your @completeLineArray array, or it might be some other error handling technique. Below, I check for two possibilities: That $key doesn't point to a valid entry in %fastaHash, or that $key does actually point to a valid entry in your %fastaHash, but that value is undefined:

if ( defined $fastaHash{$key} ) {
    $fullLine = $allLines[$index] . "," . $fastaHash{$key};
    push(@completeLineArray, $fullLine);
}
elsif ( not exists $fashaHash{$key} ){  #Key could exist, but value be `undef`
   ...;   #What you want to do if value key points to is undefined.
}
else (
   ...;   #What you want to do if $key doesn't point to a key in your hash
}
share|improve this answer
    
If you want to ignore an uninitialized value for a certain variable, you could also do something like this: $fullLine = $allLines[$index] . "," . ($fastaHash{$key} // '');. Then you won't lose warnings for the other part of the statement. –  dan1111 Oct 22 '12 at 8:00
    
I added the code of the entire subroutine. I might show you where the values come from. –  Tom K. Oct 22 '12 at 8:46

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.