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i write a program that decides type of a triangle. When user enter a string input it gives error. I want to give error also for double inputs. IN ORDER TO do that i tried this

else if (s1[i] == '.') {
                found_double = 1;
                break;

but programs recognizes . as a string also. How can i solve this? Full code is below.

/*
 * HW3-3.c
 *
 *  Created on: Oct 21, 2012
 *      Author: mert
 */


 #include <string.h>
 #include <stdio.h>

 void checkTriangle(char *s1,char *s2,char *s3)
  {
    int i;
    int found_double = 0;
    int found_letter = 0;
    int len = strlen(s1);
    int len2 = strlen(s2);
    int len3 = strlen(s3);

    for( i = 0; i < len; i++)
    {
        if(s1[i] < '0' || s1[i] > '9')
        {
            found_letter = 1; // this variable works as a boolean
            break;
        } else if (s1[i] == '.') {
            found_double = 1;
            break;
        }
    }


    for( i = 0; i < len2; i++)
    {
        if(s2[i] < '0' || s2[i] > '9')
        {
            found_letter = 1; // this variable works as a boolean
            break;
        } else if (s2[i] == '.') {
            found_double = 1;
            break;
        }
    }


    for( i = 0; i < len3; i++)
    {
        if(s3[i] < '0' || s3[i] > '9')
        {
            found_letter = 1; // this variable works as a boolean
            break;
        } else if (s3[i] == '.') {
            found_double = 1;
            break;
        }
    }

    if(found_letter) // value 0 means false, any other value means true
        printf("Please enter an integer instead of string.");
    else if (found_double)
        printf("Please enter an integer instead of double.");
    else
    {
            int side1 = atoi(s1);
            int side2 = atoi(s2);
            int side3 = atoi(s3);

            if ((side1 + side2 > side3 && side1 +  side3 > side2 && side2 + side3 > side1) && (side1 > 0 && side2 > 0 && side3 > 0))
                 {
                // Deciding type of triangle according to given input.
                  if (side1 == side2 && side2 == side3)
                      printf("EQUILATERAL TRIANGLE");
                  else if (side1 == side2 || side2 == side3 || side1 == side3)
                      printf("ISOSCELES TRIANGLE\n");
                  else
                      printf("SCALENE TRIANGLE \n");
                }
                 else
                     printf("\nTriangle could not be formed.");
    }
  }


  int main(void)
  {

      char s[32], s2[32], s3[32];

      printf("Please enter sides of triangle");
      printf("\nPlease enter side 1:");
      gets(s);
      printf("Please enter side 2:");
      gets(s2);
      printf("Please enter side 3:");
      gets(s3);

      checkTriangle(s,s2,s3);
  }
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Don't use gets()! Use fgets(s, sizeof(s), stdin) and (if necessary) deal with the newline that fgets() keeps and gets() discards. Using gets() is a security disaster; it has been removed from Standard C 2011 library (though sadly it will be around in libraries as an extension for aeons yet). Forget the gets() exists. The only safe implementation, in my book, for gets() is char *gets(char *s) { abort(); }. You should treat it as if that is the implementation. –  Jonathan Leffler Oct 21 '12 at 14:47
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marked as duplicate by Jonathan Leffler, WhozCraig, abligh, ugoren, Kerrek SB Mar 25 at 23:10

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2 Answers

  1. s1 is a char* so it is expected that '.' will be (in your words) a string.
  2. The value of '.' is smaller than '0' (or maybe bigger than '9'), so you will enter the first if and skip the else if
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You can change the order of your IF's.

 if (s1[i] == '.')
 {
       //code here
 }
 else if(s1[i] < '0' || s1[i] > '9')
 {
     //code here
 }

because ascii code for '.' is definetily not in the interval ['0', '9'], So it would always be caught in the first IF.

you can try the following code to see their ascii values:

  printf("Ascii code for char '.' is %d\n", '.');
  printf("Ascii code for char '0' is %d\n", '0'); 
  printf("Ascii code for char '9' is %d\n", '9'); 
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