Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm writing a program in C. In the program, the user has to choose a number, either 1, 2 or 3. I would like to construct the code so that when the user enters in a number that isn't 1, 2 or 3, he/she will be told "Invalid selection - choose again" and then they will be brought back to the start of the program:

int main() {

    int choice;
    char response, Y, N;

    printf("Choose a shape from the following:\n 1.Sphere\n 2.Cone\n 3.Cylinder\n");

    scanf("%d",&choice);

    if(choice==1||choice==2||choice==3) {
        printf("Enter the radius, r\n");                             
    } else
        printf("Invalid selection, choose again.\n");

}

What I would like is that after "Invalid selection, choose again" appears, the user is brought back to the start of the program, so they can input their choice again. How would I do this?

share|improve this question
3  
use for or while or dowhile loop. –  pmtamal Oct 21 '12 at 13:32
add comment

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here is what you do:

int choice;
char response, Y, N;
for (;;) {
    printf("Choose a shape from the following:\n 1.Sphere\n 2.Cone\n 3.Cylinder\n");

    scanf("%d",&choice);

    if(choice==1||choice==2||choice==3) {
        break;                    
    }
    printf("Invalid selection, choose again.\n");
}

Once this loop is over, prompt for the radius. You will nearly certainly need another loop to prevent the input of negative values for the radius, so do not prompt for it in the same loop.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. This is what I'm looking for, as I need the "choose a shape" prompt to appear following "invalid selection". –  user1763115 Oct 21 '12 at 14:10
add comment

Use a while loop for this

int main()
{
    int choice;
    char response, Y, N;

    printf("Choose a shape from the following:\n 1.Sphere\n 2.Cone\n 3.Cylinder\n");
    while(1)
    {
        scanf("%d",&choice);

        if(choice==1||choice==2||choice==3)
        {
            printf("Enter the radius, r\n");                             
            //Maybe read the radius here
            scanf("%d",&radius);
            break;
        }
        else
            printf("Invalid selection, choose again.\n");
    }
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

use do-while loop, loops until correct input
do like this,add choice 4 for exit:

 do {
        scanf("%d",&choice);
int flag=0;
        if(choice==1||choice==2||choice==3) {
            printf("Enter the radius, r\n");                             
        } else {
            printf("Invalid selection, choose again.\n");
            flag=1;
        }
    } while(flag==1&& choice!=4);
share|improve this answer
1  
This is an infinite loop. Once flag is set, it never changes again. –  Blue Moon Oct 21 '12 at 13:39
    
@KingsIndian:yeah updated,see updated one –  Ravindra Bagale Oct 21 '12 at 13:42
    
Still won't work. What do you mean by choice!=4? It'll be an infinite loop. First wrong input sets the flag to 1 and any subsequent correct input won't break the loop. –  Blue Moon Oct 21 '12 at 13:47
add comment

Some people will object to this, but I think in these situations a plain old goto is a very clean and readable way of doing things, because it emphasizes the linearity of the "normal" control path:

int main(int arg, char *argv[])
{
    int choice;

choose_shape:
    printf("Choose a shape from the following:\n"
           " 1.Sphere\n 2.Cone\n 3.Cylinder\n");
    scanf("%d", &choice);
    if (choice < 1 || choice > 3) {
        printf("Invalid selection, please choose again.\n");
        goto choose_shape;
    }

    printf("Enter the radius, r:\n");
    ...
}

Yes, people have complained about goto so let me justify it some more.

Here is a more sophisticated version that allows you to select a shape by letter:

    char c;
    shape_t shape;
choose_shape:
    printf("Choose a shape: [s]phere, [c]one, c[y]linder:\n");
    scanf("%c", &c);
    switch (c) {
    cases 's':
        shape = SHAPE_SPHERE;
        break;

    case 'c':
        shape = SHAPE_CONE;
        break;

    case 'y':
        shape = SHAPE_CYLINDER;
        break;

    default:
        printf("Not a valid shape: %c\n", c);
        goto choose_shape;
    }

And here is the version with goto. Note that this introduces another variable, flag, whose only purpose is to get rid of the goto statement. You cannot simply use break here (which is an unlabeled goto to begin with) because of the switch statement. I consider this harder to read due to the additional state. It's five lines longer.

    char c;
    shape_t shape;
    int flag;
    for (flag = 0; !flag; ) {
        printf("Choose a shape: [s]phere, [c]one, c[y]linder:\n");
        scanf("%c", &c);
        switch (c) {
        cases 's':
            shape = SHAPE_SPHERE;
            flag = 1;
            break;

        case 'c':
            shape = SHAPE_CONE;
            flag = 1;
            break;

        case 'y':
            shape = SHAPE_CYLINDER;
            flag = 1;
            break;

        default:
            printf("Not a valid shape: %c\n", c);
            break;
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Please don't use goto. –  Desert Ice Oct 21 '12 at 13:35
    
using goto is bad practice –  Ravindra Bagale Oct 21 '12 at 13:35
    
@DesertIce: If you can't articulate why not to use goto, then you're just repeating what someone told you. –  Dietrich Epp Oct 21 '12 at 13:39
    
@RavindraBagale: Explain why, don't just say "X is wrong". –  Dietrich Epp Oct 21 '12 at 13:39
    
Are you really asking why goto is not good practice? I'll give you two reasons on my mind : 1.As the size of the program increases using goto will make it difficult to understand the flow of the program. 2. It also drastically decreases the readability of the code for others. –  Desert Ice Oct 21 '12 at 13:41
show 4 more comments

Here is an alternative for you to consider. Notice that the getting of user input is separated into a function and the main() just calls that function and loops on error. Readers of main() probably don't care about how you get the input choice, so why make them read it?

Also notice that I used fgets, not scanf. If you run your version with scanf and enter a non-digit, that character will remain in the input buffer indefinitely; scanf will never remove it as it is looking for digits to satisfy the %d format string - hence an infinite loop. You could try flushing stdin before the scanf (using fpurge) but the function would still not correctly handle the closing of stdin (eg with ctrl-d on the shell UNIX based systems).

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

static int get_shape(int *shape)
{
    char buf[10] = "";
    printf("Choose a shape from the following:\n"
           " 1.Sphere\n 2.Cone\n 3.Cylinder\n");

    if (!fgets(buf, sizeof buf, stdin)) { /* Note: fgets, not scanf */
        exit(1); /* ctrl-d */
    }
    *shape = strtol(buf, NULL, 0);

    if (*shape==1 || *shape==2 || *shape==3) {
        return 1;
    }
    printf("Invalid selection\n");
    return 0;
}

int main(int argc, char ** argv)
{
    int shape = 0;
    while (!get_shape(&shape)) {
        /* loop */
    }
    printf("Choice: %d\n", shape);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.