Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The program reads vertices and indices form a textile, and stores the vertices in a vector, and indices in an array. Heres is quad.txt -

4 2 numVertices numIndices

-1 -1 0 v1 v2 v3

1 -1 0

1 1 0

-1 1 0

1 2 3

1 3 4

I then render the object to screen - No problem. But when I try to calculate the normals and flat shade the object I get problems. The object is rendered with GL_TRINANGLES. It looks like this http://imgur.com/wnKWP (didn't have enough reputation to upload it directly...)

It's like the triangles get shaded separately... Anyway here is the code:

#include "Object.h"
#include <vector>
#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <cstring>
#include <glm.hpp>


using namespace std;

const int NMAX = 20000;

GLuint indicesArr[NMAX];

vector<glm::vec3> drawFigure;   glm::vec3 figure;
vector<glm::vec3>Vertices;      glm::vec3 vertex;
vector<glm::vec3>Normals;       glm::vec3 normal;
vector<glm::vec3>Temp;          glm::vec3 temp;


int numVertices, numIndices;

//slices = number of subdivisions around the axis
Object::Object() :
mIsInitialised(false)
{
}

Object::~Object()
{
if(mIsInitialised)
{
    drawFigure.clear();
    Vertices.clear();
    Normals.clear();
    Temp.clear();
}
}


bool Object::loadTxtFile(const string &filename)
{
ifstream in(filename);
in >> numVertices >> numIndices;

while (!in.eof())
{
    for (unsigned int i = 1; i <= numVertices; i++)
    {
        in >> vertex.x >> vertex.y >> vertex.z;
        Vertices.push_back(vertex);
    }

    for (unsigned int i = 1; i <= numIndices * 3; i++)
        in >> indicesArr[i];
}

for (unsigned int i = 1; i <= (numIndices * 3); i++)
{
    figure.x = Vertices[indicesArr[i] - 1].x;
    figure.y = Vertices[indicesArr[i] - 1].y;
    figure.z = Vertices[indicesArr[i] - 1].z;
    drawFigure.push_back(figure);
}

for (unsigned int i = 0; i < (numIndices * 3); i+=3)
{
    temp.x = drawFigure[i].x;
    temp.y = drawFigure[i].y;
    temp.z = drawFigure[i].z;
    Temp.push_back(temp);

    temp.x = drawFigure[i + 1].x;
    temp.y = drawFigure[i + 1].y;
    temp.z = drawFigure[i + 1].z;
    Temp.push_back(temp);

    temp.x = drawFigure[i + 2].x;
    temp.y = drawFigure[i + 2].y;
    temp.z = drawFigure[i + 2].z;
    Temp.push_back(temp);

    normal = glm::normalize(glm::cross(Temp[i + 2] - Temp[i], Temp[i + 1] - Temp[i]));
    Normals.push_back(normal);
}
mIsInitialised = true;
return true;  //Return true if successfully loaded
}


void Object::draw()
{

if(!mIsInitialised) { return; }

//Tell OpenGL about our vertex and colour data
glEnableClientState(GL_VERTEX_ARRAY);
glVertexPointer(3, GL_FLOAT, 0, &drawFigure.front());

glEnableClientState(GL_NORMAL_ARRAY);
glNormalPointer(GL_FLOAT, 0, &Normals.front());

//draw the .txt-file
glDrawArrays(GL_TRIANGLES, 0, (numIndices * 3));

//restore the state GL back
glDisableClientState(GL_VERTEX_ARRAY);
glDisableClientState(GL_NORMAL_ARRAY);
}
share|improve this question
    
Try printing out the normal values to see if they make sense –  Grimmy Oct 21 '12 at 18:18
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You need one normal per vertex. You are currently calculating is one normal per triangle. Take a look at the following post about computing the normals: http://devmaster.net/forums/topic/1065-calculating-normals-of-a-mesh/

As the post describe there is two ways to compute the normal per vertex:

  1. The vertex normal is the average of the adjacent face normals (See #1 in the devmaster post)
  2. The vertex normal is the angle weighted average of the adjacent face normals (See #6 in the devmaster post)
share|improve this answer
    
Very helpful thank you! –  Nilzone- Oct 21 '12 at 21:19
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.