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I am using the following code to test for Equals

public override bool Equals(object obj)
{
    // Equals must return false on compares to null. 
    if (obj == null || GetType() != obj.GetType())
        return false;

    Foo fooItem = obj as Foo;

    return fooItem.FooId == this.FooId;
}

If obj is a superclass, how should I handle that? Should it always return false, or are there times it should be true?

How do I make a comparison?

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3 Answers 3

It really depends upon what you want equality to mean.

I don't think I've ever allowed for equality between different classes. You may have a case that does, though.

Remember too that you can use a custom IEqualityComparer<T>. This is a good strategy whenever you want to test for equality in a way that's not truly general, as it means other code in other situations isn't stuck with your override. You can only override Equals once per type, but you can have as many comparers as you want.

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Simply get rid of the GetType() comparison and move obj as Foo to the first line.

The code would then be

public override bool Equals(object obj)
{
    var fooItem = obj as Foo;
    // Equals must return false on compares to null. 
    if (obj == null) {
        return false;
    }

    return fooItem.FooId == this.FooId;
}

This assumes that there's a meaning full value comparison for all Foo's even derived once or that the class implementing the above override of Equalsis sealed.

If there's no meaningful value comparison for all Foos (including derived once) then I suggest to use an IEqualityComaprer instead. As with all other instance methods you should only include them in you class hierarchy if they are truely a part of the type and not just an auxiliary method

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While there may be some scenarios in which it may be useful to have objects of different types report themselves as equal to each other, I would strongly recommend against such usage; the only time I can see it as being possibly justifiable would be if all of the types inherited from a common base class which included a sealed Equals method that used various virtual methods ask the objects what means of expedited equality comparisons they support, uses the best available method, and if no expedited method is available, converts the objects to a canonical form and compares those.

For example, consider abstract ImmutableFloatingPointMatrix type which implements a two-argument indexed property getter. Two matrices should be considered equal if they have the same size, and have the same values in the same places. While it would be possible for a derived class to use a two-dimensional array to hold the contents of the matrix, many other storage methods would be possible. For example, one might have a concrete IdentityMatrix class which has a single Size field, always reports its dimension as SizexSize, and has an indexed property that returns 1.0 for cells on the main diagonal and 0.0 elsewhere. One could also have a DiagonalMatrix which uses a single Size-item array to hold things on the diagonal. While any two matrices could be compared for equality by checking all of the corresponding elements, checking e.g. a DiagonalMatrix against an IdentitymMatrix could be better handled by ensuring that the two matrices are the same size, and all the items in the array equal 1.0 (not bothering to check any spots outside the main diagonal, since there won't be any).

Even with a type where the semantics of Equals could be sensibly defined so that objects of different types would report themselves as equal, it may not be the best idea. In cases where one could use a custom EqualityComparer, that would probably be better than a strange override of Equals.

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