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I am new to VHDL, working on a homework assignment.

I have a very simple clock divider using a generic. (It's a counter/divider.)

-- the actual divider will be 2.1e6 or so (25Mhz down to 15hz)
run_divider : clk_divider
--pragma synthesis off
    generic map(clkmax => 4) -- simulation
--pragma synthesis on
    generic map(clkmax => 50000) -- synthesis
      port map( clk_in => mclk,
                reset => rst,
                clk_out => divider_out );

I partially used Equivalent of #ifdef in VHDL for simulation/synthesis separation? with the pragma above. However, this only works in synthesis but is a syntax error in simulation.

Other than using an external tool (M4, C preprocessor as another answer suggested), is there a better way to have separate code for synthesis vs simulation? I'd like to stopy worrying about these constants when I switch between synthesis to simulation.

Answers to How to convert 24MHz and 12MHz clock to 8MHz clock using VHDL? tell me the counter/divider is not an optimal solution but it's simple enough for my homework :-)

My full divider code is here: https://github.com/linuxlizard/vhdl/blob/master/divider.vhdl

Thank you!

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

As simon says, you can use a flag with a generate - if you put this code into some utility package, you can use it throughout your design. Or just add it to the local architecture if it's a one-off:

constant in_simulation : boolean := false
--synthesis translate_off
                                    or true
--synthesis translate_on
;

A potentially useful alternative is:

constant in_simulation : integer  := 0
--synthesis translate_off
                                    + 1
--synthesis translate_on
;

constant in_synthesis : integer  := 1
--synthesis translate_off
                                    - 1
--synthesis translate_on
;

Which can be used, in your case, to do:

constant clkmax_coefficient : integer := 4*in_simulation + 50000*in_synthesis;

run_divider : clk_divider
    generic map(clkmax => clkmax_coefficient)
...
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All great, useful answers! Thanks! –  David Poole Oct 24 '12 at 1:03

You could use the generate statement in combination with a boolean flag in a package.

g_simulation : if SIMULATION_FLAG generate
    run_divider : clk_divider
    generic map(clkmax => 4) -- simulation
    port map(clk_in => mclk,
        reset => rst,
        clk_out => divider_out);
end generate g_simulation;

g_synthesis : if not SIMULATION_FLAG generate
    run_divider : clk_divider
    generic map(clkmax => 50000) -- synthesis
    port map(clk_in => mclk,
        reset => rst,
        clk_out => divider_out);
end generate g_synthesis;

You might be able to write a simple simulation/synthesis script that sets the SIMULATION_FLAG before compiling your sources (or just change it manually if you don't have to do it often).

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It is correct that the simulator is giving you a syntax error, because you have two generic statements in the code.

The easiest way to do this is to make 50000 your default value in your design and then modify your code to this:

    -- the actual divider will be 2.1e6 or so (25Mhz down to 15hz)
run_divider : clk_divider
--pragma synthesis off
    generic map(clkmax => 4) -- simulation
--pragma synthesis on
      port map( clk_in => mclk,
                reset => rst,
                clk_out => divider_out );

This way, for simulation, you get the clkmax set to 4, and for synthesis it will be set to the default value of 50000.

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