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I have a set of ***Converter objects that inherit from IConverter with the goal of deserializing an object from a string or XML:

public interface IConverter
{
    object Convert(object value, Type targetType);
}

(I do not know the type at compile-time so I can't use generics here).

I use a ConvertsAttribute to mark which types a converter can convert, which then doubles up as a Ninject ConstraintAttribute:

[AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.Class | AttributeTargets.Parameter | AttributeTargets.Property, AllowMultiple = true, Inherited = true)]
public class ConvertsAttribute : ConstraintAttribute
{
    public Type TargetType { get; private set; }
    public ConvertsAttribute(Type t)
    {
        TargetType = t;
    }

    public override bool Matches(IBindingMetadata metadata)
    {
        return metadata.Has("Converts") && metadata.Get<Type>("Converts") == this.TargetType;
    }
}

[Converts(typeof(Int32))]
[Converts(typeof(Single))]
[Converts(typeof(String))]
[Converts(typeof(Double))]
public class BasicConverter : IConverter
{
    public object Convert(object value, Type targetType)
    {
        return System.Convert.ChangeType(value, targetType);
    }
}

When binding converters in my serialization module, I attach the type metadata under "Converts":

    private void BindConverter(Type typeInfo)
    {
        var converterAttributes = typeInfo.GetCustomAttributes(typeof(ConvertsAttribute), true);

        foreach (var attribute in converterAttributes.Cast<ConvertsAttribute>())
            Bind<IConverter>().To(typeInfo).WithMetadata("Converts", attribute.TargetType);
    }

When resolving types, I can then query the container for the converter that converts a particular type:

    private IConverter GetConverter(Type t)
    {
        return converterKernel.Get<IConverter>(metadata => t == metadata.Get<Type>("Converts"));
    }

However, this means that I have to take the IKernel instance in my class constructor and query it at runtime which I'd like to avoid (it smells that I am able to query my converterKernel for non-IConverter objects).

I could simply request IEnumerable<IConverter> in the constructor and then query the ConvertsAttribute on the type of each converter, but I wonder if there is a way to harness Ninject's metadata to do this for me... Can I request an IEnumerable<IConverter> in my constructor with attached metadata? In this instance I would like to construct a dictionary of type IDictionary<Type, IConverter> which means I won't have to query the container itself.

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1 Answer 1

I do not know the type at compile-time so I can't use generics here.

Don't knowing the type at compile-time, doesn't mean you can't use generics. On the contrary, I think you should use generics, because:

  • it allows you to (easily) batch-register those types by their generic interface,
  • it allows you to request the correct converter at once, instead of having to request all and looping through them to find out which converter to use, and without having to decorate types with a ConvertsAttribute (since this information is already available in the metadata by implementing that generic interface),
  • and it allows you to define a default (fallback) implementation (that maps to System.Convert.ChangeType) for any type that lacks a custom converter.

You would still need the non-generic IConverter interface, and a consumer that doesn't have a compile-time type can depend on that interface. But besides this non-generic interface, you can define the following generic interface:

public interface IConverter<T>
{
    T Convert(object value);
}

You can now define custom converters by implementing that interface:

public class MyTypeConverter : IConverter<MyType>
{
    public MyType Convert(object value) { ... }
}

And you can define a generic implementation that can be used as 'fallback' implementation. This implementation can be used when there is no custom converter registered for the requested type:

public class DefaultConverter<T> : IConverter<T>
{
    public T Convert(object value)
    {
        return System.Convert.ChangeType(value, targetType);
    }
}

Since your consumers don't have any type information available at compile-time, it is still convenient to have the non-generic IConverter hanging around. You can define an implementation of this interface as part of your composition root. When you place it inside this bootstrapper logic, you are allowed to depend on the Kernel, without using your container as a Service Locator:

public class NinjectConverter : IConverter
{
    private readonly Kernel kernel;

    public NinjectConverter(Kernel kernel)
    {
        this.kernel = kernel;
    }

    public object Convert(object value, Type targetType)
    {
        var converterType =
            typeof(IConverter<>).MakeGenericType(targetType);

        dynamic converter = this.kernel.Get(converterType);

        return converter.Convert(value);
    }
}

This implementation uses reflection and dynamic typing. This will not be the best performing code, but compared to the overhead of Ninject, the overhead will probably be insignificant.

You can now easily batch register all defined custom converters as follows:

var assembly = typeof(IConverter<>).Assembly;

var converterRegistrations =
    from type in assembly.GetExportedTypes()
    where !type.IsAbstract && !type.IsGenericTypeDefinition
    from service in type.GetInterfaces()
    where service.IsGenericType
    where service.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == 
        typeof(IConverter<>)
    select { service, type };

foreach (var registration in converterRegistrations)
{
    kernel.Bind(registration.service).To(registration.type);
}

I expect there to be an easier way to do this with Ninject (a one-liner perhaps), but to be honest, I don't Ninject well enough. To anyone reading this: please update my answer if you know a better way.

You can register your fallback-converter like this:

kernel.Bind(typeof(IConverter<>))
    .To(typeof(DefaultConverter<>))
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