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Given two data frames:

df1 = data.frame(CustomerId = c(1:6), Product = c(rep("Toaster", 3), rep("Radio", 3)))
df2 = data.frame(CustomerId = c(2, 4, 6), State = c(rep("Alabama", 2), rep("Ohio", 1)))

df1
#  CustomerId Product
#           1 Toaster
#           2 Toaster
#           3 Toaster
#           4   Radio
#           5   Radio
#           6   Radio

df2
#  CustomerId   State
#           2 Alabama
#           4 Alabama
#           6    Ohio

How can I do database style, i.e., sql style, joins? That is, how do I get:

  • An inner join of df1 and df2:
    Return only the rows in which the left table have matching keys in the right table.
  • An outer join of df1 and df2:
    Returns all rows from both tables, join records from the left which have matching keys in the right table.
  • A left outer join (or simply left join) of df1 and df2
    Return all rows from the left table, and any rows with matching keys from the right table.
  • A right outer join of df1 and df2
    Return all rows from the right table, and any rows with matching keys from the left table.

Extra credit:

How can I do a sql style select statement?

share|improve this question
4  
@user3114046 There are actually four distinct and valid approaches in the answers below, each drawing on a different package and with its own merits - so if it's really an RTFM question, then that seems like solid justification to allow those kinds of questions, since they can produce unexpected answers. Is the rep involved absurd? Hell yes - my trivial answer is a full third of my total rep. But this question was part of a mass effort to make StackOverflow the premier site for R help on the web and, judging from its rank when googling "R join" and the 80k visits to date, it's done a fine job. – Matt Parker May 23 '14 at 15:49
    
@MattParker I was probably in a bad mood that day. I upvoted the first dplyr answer, that's become my favorite way to do this now. Yes, this question comes up as the first hit in my particular search bubble too. – James King May 23 '14 at 17:01
1  
stat545-ubc.github.io/bit001_dplyr-cheatsheet.html ←my favourite answer to this question – isomorphismes Jul 21 '15 at 0:26

11 Answers 11

up vote 601 down vote accepted

By using the merge function and its optional parameters:

Inner join: merge(df1, df2) will work for these examples because R automatically joins the frames by common variable names, but you would most likely want to specify merge(df1, df2, by = "CustomerId") to make sure that you were matching on only the fields you desired. You can also use the by.x and by.y parameters if the matching variables have different names in the different data frames.

Outer join: merge(x = df1, y = df2, by = "CustomerId", all = TRUE)

Left outer: merge(x = df1, y = df2, by = "CustomerId", all.x = TRUE)

Right outer: merge(x = df1, y = df2, by = "CustomerId", all.y = TRUE)

Cross join: merge(x = df1, y = df2, by = NULL)

Just as with the inner join, you would probably want to explicitly pass "CustomerId" to R as the matching variable. I think it's almost always best to explicitly state the identifiers on which you want to merge; it's safer if the input data.frames change unexpectedly and easier to read later on.

share|improve this answer
2  
@MattParker I have been using sqldf package for a whole host of complex queries against dataframes, really needed it to do a self-cross join (ie data.frame cross-joining itself) I wonder how it compares from a performance perspective....??? – Nicholas Hamilton Feb 12 '13 at 4:42
4  
@ADP I've never really used sqldf, so I'm not sure about speed. If performance is a major issue for you, you should also look into the data.table package - that's a whole new set of join syntax, but it's radically faster than anything we're talking about here. – Matt Parker Feb 12 '13 at 16:22
1  
With more clarity and explanation..... mkmanu.wordpress.com/2016/04/08/… – Manoj Kumar Apr 7 at 20:08

I would recommend checking out Gabor Grothendieck's sqldf package, which allows you to express these operations in SQL.

library(sqldf)

## inner join
df3 <- sqldf("SELECT CustomerId, Product, State 
              FROM df1
              JOIN df2 USING(CustomerID)")

## left join (substitute 'right' for right join)
df4 <- sqldf("SELECT CustomerId, Product, State 
              FROM df1
              LEFT JOIN df2 USING(CustomerID)")

I find the SQL syntax to be simpler and more natural than its R equivalent (but this may just reflect my RDBMS bias).

See Gabor's sqldf GitHub for more information on joins.

share|improve this answer

There is the data.table approach for an inner join, which is very time and memory efficient (and necessary for some larger data.frames):

library(data.table)

dt1 <- data.table(df1, key = "CustomerId") 
dt2 <- data.table(df2, key = "CustomerId")

joined.dt1.dt.2 <- dt1[dt2]

base::merge also works on data.tables:

merge(dt1, dt2)

data.table documented on stackoverflow:
How to do a data.table merge operation
Translating SQL joins on foreign keys to R data.table syntax
Efficient alternatives to merge for larger data.frames R
How to do a basic left outer join with data.table in R?

Yet another option is the join function found in the plyr package

library(plyr)

join(df1, df2,
     type = "inner")

#   CustomerId Product   State
# 1          2 Toaster Alabama
# 2          4   Radio Alabama
# 3          6   Radio    Ohio

Options for type: inner, left, right, full.

From ?join: Unlike merge, [join] preserves the order of x no matter what join type is used.

share|improve this answer
6  
+1 for mentioning plyr::join. Microbenchmarking indicates, that it performs about 3 times faster than merge. – Beasterfield May 30 '13 at 11:28
7  
However, data.table is much faster than both. There is also great support in SO, i don't see many package writers answering questions here as often as the data.table writer or contributors. – marbel Jan 2 '14 at 2:36
    
What is the data.table syntax for merging a list of data frames? – Aleksandr Blekh Aug 6 '14 at 3:45
    
Please note: dt1[dt2] is a right outer join (not a "pure" inner join) so that ALL rows from dt2 will be part of the result even if there is no matching row in dt1. Impact: You result has potentially unwanted rows if you have key values in dt2 that do not match the dt1's key values. – R Yoda Nov 11 '15 at 7:24
4  
@RYoda you can just specify nomatch = 0L in that case. – David Arenburg Nov 11 '15 at 21:20

You can do joins as well using Hadley Wickham's awesome new dplyr package.

Here is how you can do most of the joins in the original question with dplyr

library(dplyr)

#make sure that CustomerId cols are both type numeric
#they ARE not using the provided code in question and dplyr will complain
df1$CustomerId <- as.numeric(df1$CustomerId)
df2$CustomerId <- as.numeric(df2$CustomerId)


#inner
inner_join(df1, df2)

#left outer
left_join(df1, df2)

#right outer (just reverse argument order)
left_join(df2, df1)
share|improve this answer
4  
Why do you need to convert CustomerId to numeric? I don't see any mentioning in documentation (for both plyr and dplyr) about this type of restriction. Would your code work incorrectly, if the merge column would be of character type (especially interested in plyr)? Am I missing something? – Aleksandr Blekh Oct 11 '14 at 3:37
1  
To be complete, you could add the "outer join of df1 and df2" requested by the OP. In dplyr syntax, this would be: full_join(df1, df2). – Paul Rougieux May 26 at 11:47

There are some good examples of doing this over at the R Wiki. I'll steal a couple here:

Merge Method

Since your keys are named the same the short way to do an inner join is merge():

merge(df1,df2)

a full inner join (all records from both tables) can be created with the "all" keyword:

merge(df1,df2, all=TRUE)

a left outer join of df1 and df2:

merge(df1,df2, all.x=TRUE)

a right outer join of df1 and df2:

merge(df1,df2, all.y=TRUE)

you can flip 'em, slap 'em and rub 'em down to get the other two outer joins you asked about :)

Subscript Method

A left outer join with df1 on the left using a subscript method would be:

df1[,"State"]<-df2[df1[ ,"Product"], "State"]

The other combination of outer joins can be created by mungling the left outer join subscript example. (yeah, I know that's the equivalent of saying "I'll leave it as an exercise for the reader...")

share|improve this answer
1  
You should mention that these are objects from class data.table and I suppose setkey should be performed before. – giordano Dec 24 '15 at 13:49

New in 2014:

Especially if you're also interested in data manipulation in general (including sorting, filtering, subsetting, summarizing etc.), you should definitely take a look at dplyr, which comes with a variety of functions all designed to facilitate your work specifically with data frames and certain other database types. It even offers quite an elaborate SQL interface, and even a function to convert (most) SQL code directly into R.

The four joining-related functions in the dplyr package are (to quote):

  • inner_join(x, y, by = NULL, copy = FALSE, ...): return all rows from x where there are matching values in y, and all columns from x and y
  • left_join(x, y, by = NULL, copy = FALSE, ...): return all rows from x, and all columns from x and y
  • semi_join(x, y, by = NULL, copy = FALSE, ...): return all rows from x where there are matching values in y, keeping just columns from x.
  • anti_join(x, y, by = NULL, copy = FALSE, ...): return all rows from x where there are not matching values in y, keeping just columns from x

It's all here in great detail.

Selecting columns can be done by select(df,"column"). If that's not SQL-ish enough for you, then there's the sql() function, into which you can enter SQL code as-is, and it will do the operation you specified just like you were writing in R all along (for more information, please refer to the dplyr/databases vignette). For example, if applied correctly, sql("SELECT * FROM hflights") will select all the columns from the "hflights" dplyr table (a "tbl").

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Update on data.table methods for joining datasets. See below examples for each type of join. There are two methods, one from [.data.table when passing second data.table as the first argument to subset, another way is to use merge function which dispatched to fast data.table method.

Update on 2016-04-01 - and it isn't April Fools joke!
In 1.9.7 version of data.table joins are now capable to use existing index which tremendously reduce the timing of a join. Below code and benchmark does NOT use data.table indices on join. If you are looking for near real-time join you should use data.table indices.

df1 = data.frame(CustomerId = c(1:6), Product = c(rep("Toaster", 3), rep("Radio", 3)))
df2 = data.frame(CustomerId = c(2L, 4L, 7L), State = c(rep("Alabama", 2), rep("Ohio", 1))) # one value changed to show full outer join

library(data.table)

dt1 = as.data.table(df1)
dt2 = as.data.table(df2)
setkey(dt1, CustomerId)
setkey(dt2, CustomerId)
# right outer join keyed data.tables
dt1[dt2]

setkey(dt1, NULL)
setkey(dt2, NULL)
# right outer join unkeyed data.tables - use `on` argument
dt1[dt2, on = "CustomerId"]

# left outer join - swap dt1 with dt2
dt2[dt1, on = "CustomerId"]

# inner join - use `nomatch` argument
dt1[dt2, nomatch=0L, on = "CustomerId"]

# anti join - use `!` operator
dt1[!dt2, on = "CustomerId"]

# inner join
merge(dt1, dt2, by = "CustomerId")

# full outer join
merge(dt1, dt2, by = "CustomerId", all = TRUE)

# see ?merge.data.table arguments for other cases

Below benchmark tests base R, sqldf, dplyr and data.table.
Benchmark tests unkeyed/unindexed datasets. You can get even better performance if you are using keys on your data.tables or indexes with sqldf. Base R and dplyr does not have indexes or keys so I did not include that scenario in benchmark.
Benchmark is performed on 5M-1 rows datasets, there are 5M-2 common values on join column so each scenario (left, right, full, inner) can be tested and join is still not trivial to perform.

library(microbenchmark)
library(sqldf)
library(dplyr)
library(data.table)

n = 5e6
set.seed(123)
df1 = data.frame(x=sample(n,n-1L), y1=rnorm(n-1L))
df2 = data.frame(x=sample(n,n-1L), y2=rnorm(n-1L))
dt1 = as.data.table(df1)
dt2 = as.data.table(df2)

# inner join
microbenchmark(times = 10L,
               base = merge(df1, df2, by = "x"),
               sqldf = sqldf("SELECT * FROM df1 INNER JOIN df2 ON df1.x = df2.x"),
               dplyr = inner_join(df1, df2, by = "x"),
               data.table = dt1[dt2, nomatch = 0L, on = "x"])
#Unit: milliseconds
#       expr        min         lq      mean     median        uq       max neval
#       base 15546.0097 16083.4915 16687.117 16539.0148 17388.290 18513.216    10
#      sqldf 44392.6685 44709.7128 45096.401 45067.7461 45504.376 45563.472    10
#      dplyr  4124.0068  4248.7758  4281.122  4272.3619  4342.829  4411.388    10
# data.table   937.2461   946.0227  1053.411   973.0805  1214.300  1281.958    10

# left outer join
microbenchmark(times = 10L,
               base = merge(df1, df2, by = "x", all.x = TRUE),
               sqldf = sqldf("SELECT * FROM df1 LEFT OUTER JOIN df2 ON df1.x = df2.x"),
               dplyr = left_join(df1, df2, by = c("x"="x")),
               data.table = dt2[dt1, on = "x"])
#Unit: milliseconds
#       expr       min         lq       mean     median         uq       max neval
#       base 16140.791 17107.7366 17441.9538 17414.6263 17821.9035 19453.034    10
#      sqldf 43656.633 44141.9186 44777.1872 44498.7191 45288.7406 47108.900    10
#      dplyr  4062.153  4352.8021  4780.3221  4409.1186  4450.9301  8385.050    10
# data.table   823.218   823.5557   901.0383   837.9206   883.3292  1277.239    10

# right outer join
microbenchmark(times = 10L,
               base = merge(df1, df2, by = "x", all.y = TRUE),
               sqldf = sqldf("SELECT * FROM df2 LEFT OUTER JOIN df1 ON df2.x = df1.x"),
               dplyr = right_join(df1, df2, by = "x"),
               data.table = dt1[dt2, on = "x"])
#Unit: milliseconds
#       expr        min         lq       mean     median        uq       max neval
#       base 15821.3351 15954.9927 16347.3093 16044.3500 16621.887 17604.794    10
#      sqldf 43635.5308 43761.3532 43984.3682 43969.0081 44044.461 44499.891    10
#      dplyr  3936.0329  4028.1239  4102.4167  4045.0854  4219.958  4307.350    10
# data.table   820.8535   835.9101   918.5243   887.0207  1005.721  1068.919    10

# full outer join
microbenchmark(times = 10L,
               base = merge(df1, df2, by = "x", all = TRUE),
               #sqldf = sqldf("SELECT * FROM df1 FULL OUTER JOIN df2 ON df1.x = df2.x"), # not supported
               dplyr = full_join(df1, df2, by = "x"),
               data.table = merge(dt1, dt2, by = "x", all = TRUE))
#Unit: seconds
#       expr       min        lq      mean    median        uq       max neval
#       base 16.176423 16.908908 17.485457 17.364857 18.271790 18.626762    10
#      dplyr  7.610498  7.666426  7.745850  7.710638  7.832125  7.951426    10
# data.table  2.052590  2.130317  2.352626  2.208913  2.470721  2.951948    10
share|improve this answer
    
Is it worth adding an example showing how to use different column names in the on = too? – SymbolixAU May 10 at 21:52
    
@Symbolix we may wait for 1.9.8 release as it will add non-equi joins operators to on arg – jangorecki May 10 at 22:00

dplyr is very good and performant. In addition to the other answers on it, here was/is its status as of

v0.1.3 (4/2014)

Per hadley's comments in that issue:

  • right_join(x,y) is the same as left_join(y,x) in terms of the rows, just the columns will be different orders. Easily worked around with select(new_column_order)
  • outer_join is basically union(left_join(x, y), right_join(x, y)) - i.e. preserve all rows in both data frames.
share|improve this answer

In joining two data frames with ~1 million rows each, one with 2 columns and the other with ~20, I've surprisingly found merge(..., all.x = TRUE, all.y = TRUE) to be faster then dplyr::full_join(). This is with dplyr v0.4

Merge takes ~17 seconds, full_join takes ~65 seconds.

Some food for though, since I generally default to dplyr for manipulation tasks.

share|improve this answer
    
Same here, ~8 seconds vs ~76 for my two dataframes. – Perlnika May 31 at 17:37

For the case of a left join with a 0..*:0..1 cardinality or a right join with a 0..1:0..* cardinality it is possible to assign in-place the unilateral columns from the joiner directly onto the joinee, and thereby avoid the creation of an entirely new table of data. This requires matching the key columns from the joinee into the joiner and indexing+ordering the joiner's rows accordingly for the assignment.

If the key is a single column, then we can use a single call to match() to do the matching. This is the case I'll cover in this answer.

Here's an example based on the OP, except I've added an extra row to df2 with an id of 7 to test the case of a non-matching key in the joiner. This is effectively df1 left join df2:

df1 <- data.frame(CustomerId=1:6,Product=c(rep('Toaster',3L),rep('Radio',3L)));
df2 <- data.frame(CustomerId=c(2L,4L,6L,7L),State=c(rep('Alabama',2L),'Ohio','Texas'));
df1[names(df2)[-1L]] <- df2[match(df1[,1L],df2[,1L]),-1L];
df1;
##   CustomerId Product   State
## 1          1 Toaster    <NA>
## 2          2 Toaster Alabama
## 3          3 Toaster    <NA>
## 4          4   Radio Alabama
## 5          5   Radio    <NA>
## 6          6   Radio    Ohio

In the above I hard-coded an assumption that the key column is the first column of both input tables. I would argue that, in general, this is not an unreasonable assumption, since, if you have a data.frame with a key column, it would be strange if it had not been set up as the first column of the data.frame from the outset. And you can always reorder the columns to make it so. An advantageous consequence of this assumption is that the name of the key column does not have to be hard-coded, although I suppose it's just replacing one assumption with another. Concision is another advantage of numerical indexing, as well as speed. In the benchmarks below I'll change the implementation to use string name indexing to match the competing implementations.

I think this is a particularly appropriate solution if you have several tables that you want to left join against a single large table. Repeatedly rebuilding the entire table for each merge would be unnecessary and inefficient.

On the other hand, if you need the joinee to remain unaltered through this operation for whatever reason, then this solution cannot be used, since it modifies the joinee directly. Although in that case you could simply make a copy and perform the in-place assignment(s) on the copy.


As a side note, I briefly looked into possible matching solutions for multicolumn keys. Unfortunately, the only matching solutions I found were:

  • inefficient concatenations. e.g. match(interaction(df1$a,df1$b),interaction(df2$a,df2$b)), or the same idea with paste().
  • inefficient cartesian conjunctions, e.g. outer(df1$a,df2$a,`==`) & outer(df1$b,df2$b,`==`).
  • base R merge() and equivalent package-based merge functions, which always allocate a new table to return the merged result, and thus are not suitable for an in-place assignment-based solution.

For example, see Matching multiple columns on different data frames and getting other column as result, match two columns with two other columns, Matching on multiple columns, and the dupe of this question where I originally came up with the in-place solution, Combine two data frames with different number of rows in R.


Benchmarking

I decided to do my own benchmarking to see how the in-place assignment approach compares to the other solutions that have been offered in this question.

Keep in mind that these benchmarks are restricted to the case of a single-column key. As well, to ensure that the in-place solution would work for both left and right joins of the same tables, all random test data uses 0..1:0..1 cardinality. This is implemented by sampling without replacement the key column of the first data.frame when generating the key column of the second data.frame.

Testing code:

library(microbenchmark);
library(data.table);
library(sqldf);
library(plyr);
library(dplyr);

solSpecs <- list(
    merge=list(testFuncs=list(
        inner=function(df1,df2,key) merge(df1,df2,key),
        left =function(df1,df2,key) merge(df1,df2,key,all.x=TRUE),
        right=function(df1,df2,key) merge(df1,df2,key,all.y=TRUE),
        full =function(df1,df2,key) merge(df1,df2,key,all=TRUE)
    )),
    data.table.unkeyed=list(argSpec='data.table.unkeyed',testFuncs=list(
        inner=function(dt1,dt2,key) dt1[dt2,on=key,nomatch=0L],
        left =function(dt1,dt2,key) dt2[dt1,on=key],
        right=function(dt1,dt2,key) dt1[dt2,on=key],
        full =function(dt1,dt2,key) merge(dt1,dt2,key,all=TRUE) ## calls merge.data.table()
    )),
    data.table.keyed=list(argSpec='data.table.keyed',testFuncs=list(
        inner=function(dt1,dt2) dt1[dt2,nomatch=0L],
        left =function(dt1,dt2) dt2[dt1],
        right=function(dt1,dt2) dt1[dt2],
        full =function(dt1,dt2) merge(dt1,dt2,all=TRUE) ## calls merge.data.table()
    )),
    sqldf.unindexed=list(testFuncs=list( ## note: must pass connection=NULL to avoid running against the live DB connection, which would result in collisions with the residual tables from the last query upload
        inner=function(df1,df2,key) sqldf(paste0('select * from df1 inner join df2 using(',key,')'),connection=NULL),
        left =function(df1,df2,key) sqldf(paste0('select * from df1 left join df2 using(',key,')'),connection=NULL),
        right=function(df1,df2,key) sqldf(paste0('select * from df2 left join df1 using(',key,')'),connection=NULL) ## can't do right join proper, not yet supported; inverted left join is equivalent
        ##full =function(df1,df2,key) sqldf(paste0('select * from df1 full join df2 using(',key,')'),connection=NULL) ## can't do full join proper, not yet supported; possible to hack it with a union of left joins, but too unreasonable to include in testing
    )),
    sqldf.indexed=list(testFuncs=list( ## important: requires an active DB connection with preindexed main.df1 and main.df2 ready to go; arguments are actually ignored
        inner=function(df1,df2,key) sqldf(paste0('select * from main.df1 inner join main.df2 using(',key,')')),
        left =function(df1,df2,key) sqldf(paste0('select * from main.df1 left join main.df2 using(',key,')')),
        right=function(df1,df2,key) sqldf(paste0('select * from main.df2 left join main.df1 using(',key,')')) ## can't do right join proper, not yet supported; inverted left join is equivalent
        ##full =function(df1,df2,key) sqldf(paste0('select * from main.df1 full join main.df2 using(',key,')')) ## can't do full join proper, not yet supported; possible to hack it with a union of left joins, but too unreasonable to include in testing
    )),
    plyr=list(testFuncs=list(
        inner=function(df1,df2,key) join(df1,df2,key,'inner'),
        left =function(df1,df2,key) join(df1,df2,key,'left'),
        right=function(df1,df2,key) join(df1,df2,key,'right'),
        full =function(df1,df2,key) join(df1,df2,key,'full')
    )),
    dplyr=list(testFuncs=list(
        inner=function(df1,df2,key) inner_join(df1,df2,key),
        left =function(df1,df2,key) left_join(df1,df2,key),
        right=function(df1,df2,key) right_join(df1,df2,key),
        full =function(df1,df2,key) full_join(df1,df2,key)
    )),
    in.place=list(testFuncs=list(
        left =function(df1,df2,key) { cns <- setdiff(names(df2),key); df1[cns] <- df2[match(df1[,key],df2[,key]),cns]; df1; },
        right=function(df1,df2,key) { cns <- setdiff(names(df1),key); df2[cns] <- df1[match(df2[,key],df1[,key]),cns]; df2; }
    ))
);

getSolTypes <- function() names(solSpecs);
getJoinTypes <- function() unique(unlist(lapply(solSpecs,function(x) names(x$testFuncs))));
getArgSpec <- function(argSpecs,key=NULL) if (is.null(key)) argSpecs$default else argSpecs[[key]];

initSqldf <- function() {
    sqldf(); ## creates sqlite connection on first run, cleans up and closes existing connection otherwise
    if (exists('sqldfInitFlag',envir=globalenv(),inherits=F) && sqldfInitFlag) { ## false only on first run
        sqldf(); ## creates a new connection
    } else {
        assign('sqldfInitFlag',T,envir=globalenv()); ## set to true for the one and only time
    }; ## end if
    invisible();
}; ## end initSqldf()

setUpBenchmarkCall <- function(argSpecs,joinType,env=parent.frame()) {
    ## builds and returns a list of expressions suitable for passing to the list argument of microbenchmark(), and assigns variables to resolve symbol references in those expressions
    callExpressions <- list();
    nms <- character();
    for (solType in getSolTypes()) {
        testFunc <- solSpecs[[solType]]$testFuncs[[joinType]];
        if (is.null(testFunc)) next; ## this join type is not defined for this solution type
        testFuncName <- paste0('tf.',solType);
        assign(testFuncName,testFunc,envir=env);
        argSpecKey <- solSpecs[[solType]]$argSpec;
        argSpec <- getArgSpec(argSpecs,argSpecKey);
        argList <- setNames(nm=names(argSpec$args),vector('list',length(argSpec$args)));
        for (i in seq_along(argSpec$args)) {
            argName <- paste0('tfa.',argSpecKey,i);
            assign(argName,argSpec$args[[i]],envir=env);
            argList[[i]] <- if (i%in%argSpec$copySpec) call('copy',as.symbol(argName)) else as.symbol(argName);
        }; ## end for
        callExpressions[[length(callExpressions)+1L]] <- do.call(call,c(list(testFuncName),argList),quote=T);
        nms[length(nms)+1L] <- solType;
    }; ## end for
    names(callExpressions) <- nms;
    callExpressions;
}; ## end setUpBenchmarkCall()

harmonize <- function(res) {
    res <- as.data.frame(res); ## coerce to data.frame
    for (ci in which(sapply(res,is.factor))) res[[ci]] <- as.character(res[[ci]]); ## coerce factor columns to character
    res <- res[order(names(res))]; ## order columns
    res <- res[do.call(order,res),]; ## order rows
    res;
}; ## end harmonize()

checkIdentical <- function(argSpecs) {
    for (joinType in getJoinTypes()) {
        callExpressions <- setUpBenchmarkCall(argSpecs,joinType);
        if (length(callExpressions)<2L) next;
        ex <- harmonize(eval(callExpressions[[1L]]));
        for (i in seq(2L,len=length(callExpressions)-1L)) {
            y <- harmonize(eval(callExpressions[[i]]));
            if (!isTRUE(all.equal(ex,y,check.attributes=F))) {
                ex <<- ex;
                y <<- y;
                solType <- names(callExpressions)[i];
                stop(paste0('non-identical: ',solType,' ',joinType,'.'));
            }; ## end if
        }; ## end for
    }; ## end for
    invisible();
}; ## end checkIdentical()

testJoinType <- function(argSpecs,joinType,metric=NULL,times=100L) {
    callExpressions <- setUpBenchmarkCall(argSpecs,joinType);
    bm <- microbenchmark(list=callExpressions,times=times);
    if (is.null(metric)) return(bm);
    bm <- summary(bm);
    res <- setNames(nm=names(callExpressions),bm[[metric]]);
    attr(res,'unit') <- attr(bm,'unit');
    res;
}; ## end testJoinType()

testAllJoinTypes <- function(argSpecs,metric=NULL,times=100L) {
    joinTypes <- getJoinTypes();
    resList <- setNames(nm=joinTypes,lapply(joinTypes,function(joinType) testJoinType(argSpecs,joinType,metric,times)));
    if (is.null(metric)) return(resList);
    solTypes <- getSolTypes();
    units <- unname(unlist(lapply(resList,attr,'unit')));
    res <- do.call(data.frame,c(list(join=joinTypes),setNames(nm=solTypes,rep(list(rep(NA_real_,length(joinTypes))),length(solTypes))),list(unit=units,stringsAsFactors=F)));
    for (i in seq_along(resList)) res[i,match(names(resList[[i]]),names(res))] <- resList[[i]];
    res;
}; ## end testAllJoinTypes()

testGrid <- function(sizes,overlaps,joinTypes=getJoinTypes(),metric='median',times=100L) {

    res <- expand.grid(size=sizes,overlap=overlaps,joinType=joinTypes,stringsAsFactors=F);
    res[solTypes <- getSolTypes()] <- NA_real_;
    res$unit <- NA_character_;
    for (ri in seq_len(nrow(res))) {

        size <- res$size[ri];
        overlap <- res$overlap[ri];
        joinType <- res$joinType[ri];

        com <- as.integer(size*overlap);

        argSpecs <- list(
            default=list(copySpec=1:2,args=list(
                df1 <- data.frame(id=sample(size),y1=rnorm(size),y2=rnorm(size)),
                df2 <- data.frame(id=sample(c(if (com>0L) sample(df1$id,com) else integer(),seq(size+1L,len=size-com))),y3=rnorm(size),y4=rnorm(size)),
                'id'
            )),
            data.table.unkeyed=list(copySpec=1:2,args=list(
                as.data.table(df1),
                as.data.table(df2),
                'id'
            )),
            data.table.keyed=list(copySpec=1:2,args=list(
                setkey(as.data.table(df1),id),
                setkey(as.data.table(df2),id)
            ))
        );
        ## prepare sqldf
        initSqldf();
        sqldf('create index df1_key on df1(id);'); ## upload and create an sqlite index on df1
        sqldf('create index df2_key on df2(id);'); ## upload and create an sqlite index on df2

        checkIdentical(argSpecs);

        cur <- testJoinType(argSpecs,joinType,metric,times);
        res[ri,match(names(cur),names(res))] <- cur;
        res$unit[ri] <- attr(cur,'unit');

    }; ## end for

    res;

}; ## end testGrid()

Here's a benchmark of the example based on the OP that I demonstrated earlier:

## OP's example, supplemented with a non-matching row in df2
argSpecs <- list(
    default=list(copySpec=1:2,args=list(
        df1 <- data.frame(CustomerId=1:6,Product=c(rep('Toaster',3L),rep('Radio',3L))),
        df2 <- data.frame(CustomerId=c(2L,4L,6L,7L),State=c(rep('Alabama',2L),'Ohio','Texas')),
        'CustomerId'
    )),
    data.table.unkeyed=list(copySpec=1:2,args=list(
        as.data.table(df1),
        as.data.table(df2),
        'CustomerId'
    )),
    data.table.keyed=list(copySpec=1:2,args=list(
        setkey(as.data.table(df1),CustomerId),
        setkey(as.data.table(df2),CustomerId)
    ))
);
## prepare sqldf
initSqldf();
sqldf('create index df1_key on df1(CustomerId);'); ## upload and create an sqlite index on df1
sqldf('create index df2_key on df2(CustomerId);'); ## upload and create an sqlite index on df2

checkIdentical(argSpecs);

testAllJoinTypes(argSpecs,'median');
##    join    merge data.table.unkeyed data.table.keyed sqldf.unindexed sqldf.indexed      plyr    dplyr in.place         unit
## 1 inner  644.259           861.9345          923.516        9157.752      1580.390  959.2250 270.9190       NA microseconds
## 2  left  713.539           888.0205          910.045        8820.334      1529.714  968.4195 270.9185 224.3045 microseconds
## 3 right 1221.804           909.1900          923.944        8930.668      1533.135 1063.7860 269.8495 218.1035 microseconds
## 4  full 1302.203          3107.5380         3184.729              NA            NA 1593.6475 270.7055       NA microseconds

Here I benchmark on random input data, trying different scales and different patterns of key overlap between the two input tables:

## cross of various input sizes and key overlaps
sizes <- c(1e1L,1e3L,1e6L);
overlaps <- c(0.99,0.5,0.01);
system.time({ res <- testGrid(sizes,overlaps); });
##     user   system  elapsed
## 22024.65 12308.63 34493.19
res;
##       size overlap joinType      merge data.table.unkeyed data.table.keyed sqldf.unindexed sqldf.indexed      plyr     dplyr  in.place         unit
## 1       10    0.99    inner   582.2500           954.0930       1019.31050        8587.263     1478.3960  877.5435  248.0390        NA microseconds
## 2     1000    0.99    inner  1542.7575          1079.1815       1117.02950       12505.630     2667.6975 2303.7645  525.3715        NA microseconds
## 3  1000000    0.99    inner  2408.1869           229.1170        112.43049       21253.262     2602.8613 3744.1173 1250.5479        NA milliseconds
## 4       10    0.50    inner   592.9415           966.4955       1017.81350        8761.532     1464.0690  873.9085  248.2535        NA microseconds
## 5     1000    0.50    inner  1185.6670          1069.9870       1050.31550       11949.254     2232.5605 2042.6830  502.7060        NA microseconds
## 6  1000000    0.50    inner  1429.3657           187.6896         71.78789       21358.645     1734.0634 3269.7175 1180.8600        NA milliseconds
## 7       10    0.01    inner   583.7465          1008.1915       1051.17100        8984.124     1527.1475  891.6560  264.5035        NA microseconds
## 8     1000    0.01    inner   730.8585          1047.7495       1059.72400       11788.670     1845.7490 1825.6490  475.7640        NA microseconds
## 9  1000000    0.01    inner   298.8382            92.3103         37.81967       15775.247      515.6649 2859.0154 1066.9531        NA milliseconds
## 10      10    0.99     left   688.9485          1043.0450       1033.42250        8947.560     1570.1270  935.4905  256.8060  293.7980 microseconds
## 11    1000    0.99     left  1653.7330          1253.6645       1157.01400       12568.923     2700.1985 3357.0725  521.7365  700.0675 microseconds
## 12 1000000    0.99     left  2835.7767           429.1068        150.25123       22236.505     2783.3807 5128.2025 1339.2527  995.0170 milliseconds
## 13      10    0.50     left   693.2255          1039.8375       1072.12550        8970.654     1560.0770  932.9250  260.0135  300.4260 microseconds
## 14    1000    0.50     left  1817.7380          1288.9455       1211.32650       12660.226     2623.6490 4206.6050  549.3205  800.5660 microseconds
## 15 1000000    0.50     left  2891.0279           376.1839        165.94650       21899.342     2120.8095 5664.2524 1271.8792 1066.4583 milliseconds
## 16      10    0.01     left   675.9055          1037.6995       1046.89350        8822.044     1499.1365  928.2210  250.8185  299.3575 microseconds
## 17    1000    0.01     left  1798.0660          1234.2060       1131.78350       12411.333     2300.5570 4728.5550  506.7690  771.2715 microseconds
## 18 1000000    0.01     left  2194.6443           206.6973         91.34829       16268.151     1030.7471 5604.5749 1153.3744  867.7115 milliseconds
## 19      10    0.99    right  1117.0290          1044.9695       1066.99400        8904.581     1494.4325 1024.8700  254.2400  297.0055 microseconds
## 20    1000    0.99    right  2251.3775          1138.8395       1111.25550       12611.688     2692.2870 3734.0485  519.8120  683.6035 microseconds
## 21 1000000    0.99    right  3436.4797           217.0473         97.03842       21457.204     2664.7221 5329.9589 1247.7855  974.7407 milliseconds
## 22      10    0.50    right  1111.4690          1007.9775       1047.53550        8713.421     1491.0110 1015.8885  245.9005  294.2255 microseconds
## 23    1000    0.50    right  2728.2100          1188.0195       1127.29250       12560.156     2545.6025 4596.8370  537.7735  795.6485 microseconds
## 24 1000000    0.50    right  4257.9153           254.7590         74.46863       18232.545     1858.9916 6067.3200 1202.4366 1090.3296 milliseconds
## 25      10    0.01    right  1048.8185          1041.3345       1067.84900        8954.190     1544.4680 1038.1270  253.8125  299.1435 microseconds
## 26    1000    0.01    right  2684.1620          1085.5965       1089.65900       12155.382     2239.8310 4874.3845  513.6120  764.2155 microseconds
## 27 1000000    0.01    right  3600.7586           113.3788         56.65113       15098.081      892.2318 6003.5168 1129.0908  927.3354 milliseconds
## 28      10    0.99     full  1202.1315          3421.6490       3486.43800              NA            NA 1507.4760  251.2460        NA microseconds
## 29    1000    0.99     full  2305.0480          3744.5260       3652.79450              NA            NA 4025.0665  725.2995        NA microseconds
## 30 1000000    0.99     full  3629.2575           953.2663        356.27197              NA            NA 5151.9888 2361.2896        NA milliseconds
## 31      10    0.50     full  1202.1315          3370.3300       3468.26250              NA            NA 1484.8105  260.4415        NA microseconds
## 32    1000    0.50     full  3548.6615          3786.0085       3675.67400              NA            NA 4743.3085  747.5370        NA microseconds
## 33 1000000    0.50     full  7664.5438           958.4213        400.65097              NA            NA 5926.1260 2380.6542        NA milliseconds
## 34      10    0.01     full  1231.8540          3391.9270       3529.84450              NA            NA 1523.0850  260.2275        NA microseconds
## 35    1000    0.01     full  4899.6160          3927.3475       3787.07750              NA            NA 5638.3850  744.5430        NA microseconds
## 36 1000000    0.01     full 10237.9754           734.9442        280.53065              NA            NA 5971.2921 2348.3345        NA milliseconds

I wrote some code to create log-log plots of the above results. I generated a separate plot for each overlap percentage. It's a little bit cluttered, but I like having all the solution types and join types represented in the same plot.

I used spline interpolation to show a smooth curve for each solution/join type combination, drawn with individual pch symbols. The join type is captured by the pch symbol, using a dot for inner, left and right angle brackets for left and right, and a diamond for full. The solution type is captured by the color as shown in the legend.

normMult <- c(microseconds=1e-3,milliseconds=1); ## normalize to milliseconds
solTypes <- getSolTypes();
joinTypes <- getJoinTypes();
cols <- c(merge='purple',data.table.unkeyed='blue',data.table.keyed='#00DDDD',sqldf.unindexed='brown',sqldf.indexed='orange',plyr='red',dplyr='#00BB00',in.place='magenta');
pchs <- list(inner=20L,left='<',right='>',full=23L);
cexs <- c(inner=0.7,left=1,right=1,full=0.7);
NP <- 60L;
ord <- order(decreasing=T,colMeans(res[res$size==max(res$size),solTypes],na.rm=T));
ymajors <- data.frame(y=c(1,1e3),label=c('1ms','1s'),stringsAsFactors=F);
for (overlap in unique(res$overlap)) {
    x1 <- res[res$overlap==overlap,];
    x1[solTypes] <- x1[solTypes]*normMult[x1$unit]; x1$unit <- NULL;
    xlim <- c(1e1,max(x1$size));
    xticks <- 10^seq(log10(xlim[1L]),log10(xlim[2L]));
    ylim <- c(1e-1,10^floor(log10(max(x1[solTypes],na.rm=T)))); ## using floor() instead of ceiling() to zoom in a little more, only sqldf.unindexed will break above, but xpd=NA will keep it visible
    yticks <- 10^seq(log10(ylim[1L]),log10(ylim[2L]));
    yticks.minor <- rep(yticks[-length(yticks)],each=9L)*1:9;
    plot(NA,xlim=xlim,ylim=ylim,xaxs='i',yaxs='i',axes=F,xlab='size (rows)',ylab='time (ms)',log='xy');
    abline(v=xticks,col='lightgrey');
    abline(h=yticks.minor,col='lightgrey',lty=3L);
    abline(h=yticks,col='lightgrey');
    axis(1L,xticks,parse(text=sprintf('10^%d',as.integer(log10(xticks)))));
    axis(2L,yticks,parse(text=sprintf('10^%d',as.integer(log10(yticks)))),las=1L);
    axis(4L,ymajors$y,ymajors$label,las=1L,tick=F,cex.axis=0.7,hadj=0.5);
    for (joinType in rev(joinTypes)) { ## reverse to draw full first, since it's larger and would be more obtrusive if drawn last
        x2 <- x1[x1$joinType==joinType,];
        for (solType in solTypes) {
            if (any(!is.na(x2[[solType]]))) {
                xy <- spline(x2$size,x2[[solType]],xout=10^(seq(log10(x2$size[1L]),log10(x2$size[nrow(x2)]),len=NP)));
                points(xy$x,xy$y,pch=pchs[[joinType]],col=cols[solType],cex=cexs[joinType],xpd=NA);
            }; ## end if
        }; ## end for
    }; ## end for
    ## custom legend
    ## due to logarithmic skew, must do all distance calcs in inches, and convert to user coords afterward
    ## the bottom-left corner of the legend will be defined in normalized figure coords, although we can convert to inches immediately
    leg.cex <- 0.7;
    leg.x.in <- grconvertX(0.275,'nfc','in');
    leg.y.in <- grconvertY(0.6,'nfc','in');
    leg.x.user <- grconvertX(leg.x.in,'in');
    leg.y.user <- grconvertY(leg.y.in,'in');
    leg.outpad.w.in <- 0.1;
    leg.outpad.h.in <- 0.1;
    leg.midpad.w.in <- 0.1;
    leg.midpad.h.in <- 0.1;
    leg.sol.w.in <- max(strwidth(solTypes,'in',leg.cex));
    leg.sol.h.in <- max(strheight(solTypes,'in',leg.cex))*1.5; ## multiplication factor for greater line height
    leg.join.w.in <- max(strheight(joinTypes,'in',leg.cex))*1.5; ## ditto
    leg.join.h.in <- max(strwidth(joinTypes,'in',leg.cex));
    leg.main.w.in <- leg.join.w.in*length(joinTypes);
    leg.main.h.in <- leg.sol.h.in*length(solTypes);
    leg.x2.user <- grconvertX(leg.x.in+leg.outpad.w.in*2+leg.main.w.in+leg.midpad.w.in+leg.sol.w.in,'in');
    leg.y2.user <- grconvertY(leg.y.in+leg.outpad.h.in*2+leg.main.h.in+leg.midpad.h.in+leg.join.h.in,'in');
    leg.cols.x.user <- grconvertX(leg.x.in+leg.outpad.w.in+leg.join.w.in*(0.5+seq(0L,length(joinTypes)-1L)),'in');
    leg.lines.y.user <- grconvertY(leg.y.in+leg.outpad.h.in+leg.main.h.in-leg.sol.h.in*(0.5+seq(0L,length(solTypes)-1L)),'in');
    leg.sol.x.user <- grconvertX(leg.x.in+leg.outpad.w.in+leg.main.w.in+leg.midpad.w.in,'in');
    leg.join.y.user <- grconvertY(leg.y.in+leg.outpad.h.in+leg.main.h.in+leg.midpad.h.in,'in');
    rect(leg.x.user,leg.y.user,leg.x2.user,leg.y2.user,col='white');
    text(leg.sol.x.user,leg.lines.y.user,solTypes[ord],cex=leg.cex,pos=4L,offset=0);
    text(leg.cols.x.user,leg.join.y.user,joinTypes,cex=leg.cex,pos=4L,offset=0,srt=90); ## srt rotation applies *after* pos/offset positioning
    for (i in seq_along(joinTypes)) {
        joinType <- joinTypes[i];
        points(rep(leg.cols.x.user[i],length(solTypes)),ifelse(colSums(!is.na(x1[x1$joinType==joinType,solTypes[ord]]))==0L,NA,leg.lines.y.user),pch=pchs[[joinType]],col=cols[solTypes[ord]]);
    }; ## end for
    title(sprintf('R merge solutions: single-column integer key, 0..1:0..1 cardinality, %d%% overlap',as.integer(overlap*100)));
    readline(sprintf('overlap %.02f',overlap));
}; ## end for

R-merge-benchmark-99

R-merge-benchmark-50

R-merge-benchmark-1

share|improve this answer
  1. Using Merge function we can select the variable of left table or right table, same way like we all familiar with select statement in SQL (EX : Select a.* ...or Select b.* from .....)
  2. We have to add extra code which will subset from the newly joined table .

    • SQL :- select a.* from df1 a inner join df2 b on
      a.CustomerId=b.CustomerId

    • R :- merge(df1, df2, by.x = "CustomerId", by.y =
      "CustomerId")[,names(df1)]

Same way

  • SQL :- select b.* from df1 a inner join df2 b on
    a.CustomerId=b.CustomerId

  • R :- merge(df1, df2, by.x = "CustomerId", by.y = "CustomerId")[,names(df2)]

share|improve this answer

protected by hrbrmstr Apr 20 at 13:14

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