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#include <iostream>
using namespace std ;
int main()
{
    int a=5, b=4;
    cout<< a==b;
}

Why can't I print this code. How can I print boolean?

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3  
Have you tried to put a==b in brackets? –  Petar Minchev Oct 21 '12 at 14:32

4 Answers 4

You are dealing with an operator precedence issue:

cout << a==b;

is interpreted as

(cout << a) == b;

because << has a higher precedence than ==.

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Use std::boolalpha to print as true or false. And add parenthesis, see Vaughn Cato answer for explanation.

#include <iostream>
#include <iomanip>
using namespace std ;
int main()
{
    int a=5, b=4;
    cout<< boolalpha << (a==b);
}
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Still doesn't compile –  alestanis Oct 21 '12 at 14:34
    
It compiles on my side –  Zoneur Oct 21 '12 at 14:34
    
I wrote that before you put the parenthesis around a==b. –  alestanis Oct 21 '12 at 14:37
    
Please explain why the parentheses are necessary for the asker. –  Joseph Mansfield Oct 21 '12 at 14:38
    
@sftrabbit I didn't know but Vaughn Cato explained –  Zoneur Oct 21 '12 at 14:40

You have to put parenthesis around your test:

cout<< (a==b);
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but why this works but mine doesn't? –  user1559792 Oct 21 '12 at 14:35
    
Because the operator<< has precedence over ==, like operator * has precedence over + when you do 1 + 2 * 3 –  alestanis Oct 21 '12 at 14:38

Put round brackets(parentheses) around a==b:

cout<< (a==b);

This is needed, because << has greater operator precedence than ==.

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2  
Parenthesis, not brackets –  alestanis Oct 21 '12 at 14:33
    
They are called also round brackets. Otherwise I agree parentheses is more accurate. –  Petar Minchev Oct 21 '12 at 14:34
    
I checked that on wikipedia and I learnt that what I call brackets, i.e. {}, are "French brackets" (I live in France) :D –  alestanis Oct 21 '12 at 14:36
    
but why this works but mine doesn't? is it about operator precedence? –  user1559792 Oct 21 '12 at 14:37
    
@alestanis - Lol, nice one:) –  Petar Minchev Oct 21 '12 at 14:37

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