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Runtime Environment: Python 2.7, Windows 7

NOTE:I am talking about the encoding of the file generated by the PYTHON source code(NOT talking about the PYTHON source file's encoding), the encoding declared at the top of the PYTHON source file DID agree with the encoding in which the PYTHON source file was saved.

When there are no non-ascii characters in the string(content = 'abc'), the file(file.txt, NOT the PYTHON source file) is saved in ANSI encoding after fp.close(), the PYTHON file's(and it is saved in ANSI encoding format) content is as below:

## Author: melo
## Email:prevision@imsrch.tk
## Date: 2012/10/12
import os

def write_file(filepath, mode, content):
    try:
        fp = open(filepath, mode)
        try:
            print 'file encoding:', fp.encoding
            print 'file mode:', fp.mode
            print 'file closed?', fp.closed
            fp.write(content)
        finally:
            fp.close()
            print 'file closed?', fp.closed
    except IOError, e:
        print e


if __name__ == '__main__':
    filepath = os.path.join(os.getcwd(), 'file.txt')
    content = 'abc'
    write_file(filepath, 'wb', content)

but when there are some non-ascii characters in the string(content = 'abc莹'), the file(file.txt) will be saved in UTF-8 encoding after fp.close(), although I declared the encoding at the top of the PYTHON source file(not file.txt) with #encoding=gbk. At this time, the PYTHON source file's content is as below:

# -*- encoding: gbk -*-
## Author: melo
## Email:prevision@imsrch.tk
## Date: 2012/10/12
import os

def write_file(filepath, mode, content):
    try:
        fp = open(filepath, mode)
        try:
            print 'file encoding:', fp.encoding
            print 'file mode:', fp.mode
            print 'file closed?', fp.closed
            fp.write(content)
        finally:
            fp.close()
            print 'file closed?', fp.closed
    except IOError, e:
        print e

if __name__ == '__main__':
    filepath = os.path.join(os.getcwd(), 'file.txt')
    content = 'abc莹'
    write_file(filepath, 'wb', content)

Is there any proof that it behaves like this?

share|improve this question
    
What makes you say it is "saved" in UTF8? –  Erik Kronberg Oct 21 '12 at 14:44
    
@eakron file.txt is saved in UTF-8 encoding format after fp.close(), the file's encoding. I am not sure if I made it clear. –  imsrch Oct 21 '12 at 14:48
    
note: the fact that '莹' is displayed correctly means that your file is not in gbk unless copy-paste uses Unicode. u'\u83b9' Unicode character is '\xd3\xa8' two bytes as gbk and '\xe8\x8e\xb9' three bytes as utf-8. try print repr(content) –  J.F. Sebastian Oct 21 '12 at 16:31
    
@J.F.Sebastian I am talking about the encoding of the file generated by the PYTHON source code(NOT talking about the PYTHON source file's encoding), the encoding declared at the top of the PYTHON source file DID agree with the encoding in which the PYTHON source file was saved. –  imsrch Oct 22 '12 at 2:39
1  
content is a byte string which contains ... bytes. Which bytes it contains is defined by the Python source encoding because you use a Python string literal to create it. Then you use 'wb' mode to write these bytes as is to disk. Therefore the file.txt file encoding is defined by the Python source file encoding. To avoid that use Unicode strings inside your script and use codecs module to save these string to a file with desired encoding. –  J.F. Sebastian Oct 22 '12 at 2:54

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

A file is saved in the encoding you save it in. A source file is saved in the encoding you save it in. They don't have to be the same, they just should be declared.

Per your other question, I assume you are using Notepad++ and when you open file.txt you find that Notepad++ thinks the file is encoded in UTF-8 without BOM. This is an incorrect guess by Notepad++. Select the Chinese GB2312 character set and the file will display properly.

Unless given a hint by a byte order mark (BOM) or some other metadata or told by the user, programs have no idea what encoding a file is in.

A correct Python program would do these things:

  1. Declare the encoding of the source file if non-ASCII characters are used in the source file.
  2. Use Unicode strings for all text.
  3. Encode the Unicode strings when output to a binary stream such as a file.
  4. Decode incoming text data to Unicode when read from a binary stream.
  5. (optional) Use an encoding with a byte-order mark so editors know the file encoding.

Example:

# encoding: utf-8
import codecs
with codecs.open('file.txt','wb',encoding='utf-8-sig') as f:
    f.write(u'abc莹')

You should now see in Notepad++ that file.txt is detected as encoded as 'UTF-8' (with BOM) and display the file properly.

Note that you can save the file in 'ANSI' (GBK on your system) if you declare the encoding as gbk and it will still work because Unicode strings were used.

Actually, your system probably is code page 936 (cp936) instead of GBK. They aren't precisely the same. Better to use a Unicode encoding like UTF-8 or UTF-16 which can represent all Unicode characters accurately.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for 1-4 but 5 is questionable (instead you could use editors that understand the encoding declaration or just prefer utf-8 for source code encoding (it is default on Python 3)). –  J.F. Sebastian Oct 21 '12 at 15:26
    
5 was optional just for people with your opinion :). file.txt doesn't have an encoding declaration. Only the source file does. I would love for the world to use UTF-8 for all text files but alas that is not the case. –  Mark Tolonen Oct 21 '12 at 15:29
    
I'm sorry for my crappy English, I have carefully re-edit my problem and hope I have made it clear. –  imsrch Oct 21 '12 at 16:01
    
What's the difference between codecs.open('file.txt','wb',encoding='utf-8-sig') and codecs.open('file.txt','wb',encoding='utf-8')? –  imsrch Oct 22 '12 at 3:39
    
It writes the file with a UTF-8-encoded byte order mark character as an encoding signature. On reading, the utf-8-sig codec will automatically detect and remove the extra character. On Windows, where locale-encoded (ANSI) files are common, it helps some editors such as Notepad detect that the file is UTF-8. –  Mark Tolonen Oct 22 '12 at 14:32
# -*- encoding: gbk -*-

at the top of your PYTHON file, indicates the encoding of the PYTHON file. to work with codecs use the codecs module.

you need this: codecs.open()

share|improve this answer
    
I know this module works, but I just want to figure it out that why it behaves like this if I do not use codecs module. –  imsrch Oct 21 '12 at 15:36

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