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I am reading a pcap file and I want to print out the ip address and port number of each packet. I am using code from http://www.tcpdump.org/pcap.htm and http://www.rhyous.com/2011/11/13/how-to-read-a-pcap-file-from-wireshark-with-c/.

Here is my code:

#define SIZE_ETHERNET 14
#define ETHER_ADDR_LEN  6


/* Ethernet header */
    struct sniff_ethernet {
        u_char ether_dhost[ETHER_ADDR_LEN]; /* Destination host address */
        u_char ether_shost[ETHER_ADDR_LEN]; /* Source host address */
        u_short ether_type; /* IP? ARP? RARP? etc */
    };

    /* IP header */
    struct sniff_ip {
        u_char ip_vhl;      /* version << 4 | header length >> 2 */
        u_char ip_tos;      /* type of service */
        u_short ip_len;     /* total length */
        u_short ip_id;      /* identification */
        u_short ip_off;     /* fragment offset field */
    #define IP_RF 0x8000        /* reserved fragment flag */
    #define IP_DF 0x4000        /* dont fragment flag */
    #define IP_MF 0x2000        /* more fragments flag */
    #define IP_OFFMASK 0x1fff   /* mask for fragmenting bits */
        u_char ip_ttl;      /* time to live */
        u_char ip_p;        /* protocol */
        u_short ip_sum;     /* checksum */
        struct in_addr ip_src;
        struct in_addr ip_dst; /* source and dest address */
    };
    #define IP_HL(ip)       (((ip)->ip_vhl) & 0x0f)
    #define IP_V(ip)        (((ip)->ip_vhl) >> 4)

    /* TCP header */
    struct sniff_tcp {
        u_short th_sport;   /* source port */
        u_short th_dport;   /* destination port */
        u_int32_t th_seq;       /* sequence number */
        u_int32_t th_ack;       /* acknowledgement number */

        u_char th_offx2;    /* data offset, rsvd */
    #define TH_OFF(th)  (((th)->th_offx2 & 0xf0) >> 4)
        u_char th_flags;
    #define TH_FIN 0x01
    #define TH_SYN 0x02
    #define TH_RST 0x04
    #define TH_PUSH 0x08
    #define TH_ACK 0x10
    #define TH_URG 0x20
    #define TH_ECE 0x40
    #define TH_CWR 0x80
    #define TH_FLAGS (TH_FIN|TH_SYN|TH_RST|TH_ACK|TH_URG|TH_ECE|TH_CWR)
        u_short th_win;     /* window */
        u_short th_sum;     /* checksum */
        u_short th_urp;     /* urgent pointer */
};

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{

    //get file
     char *filename = argv[1];

     //error buffer
     char errbuff[PCAP_ERRBUF_SIZE];

     //open file and create pcap handler
     pcap_t * handler = pcap_open_offline(filename, errbuff);

     //The header that pcap gives us
    struct pcap_pkthdr *header;

    //The actual packet 
    const u_char *packet;   

      int packetCount = 0;
      int i;

      //write to file 
      FILE *fp = fopen ( "result.txt", "w" ) ;

      //tcp info
    const struct sniff_ethernet *ethernet; /* The ethernet header */
    const struct sniff_ip *ip; /* The IP header */
    const struct sniff_tcp *tcp; /* The TCP header */
    u_int size_ip;
    u_int size_tcp;

    while (pcap_next_ex(handler, &header, &packet) >= 0)
    {
        // Show the packet number
        printf("Packet # %i\n", ++packetCount);
        fprintf(fp,"Packet # %i\n", packetCount);

        // Show the size in bytes of the packet
        printf("Packet size: %d bytes\n", header->len);
        fprintf(fp,"Packet size: %d bytes\n", header->len);

        // Show a warning if the length captured is different
        if (header->len != header->caplen)
            printf("Warning! Capture size different than packet size: %ld bytes\n", header->len);

        // Show Epoch Time
        printf("Epoch Time: %d:%d seconds\n", header->ts.tv_sec, header->ts.tv_usec);
        fprintf(fp,"Epoch Time: %d:%d seconds\n", header->ts.tv_sec, header->ts.tv_usec);

        ethernet = (struct sniff_ethernet*)(packet);
        ip = (struct sniff_ip*)(packet + SIZE_ETHERNET);
        size_ip = IP_HL(ip)*4;
        if (size_ip < 20) {
            printf("   * Invalid IP header length: %u bytes\n", size_ip);
            return;
        }
        tcp = (struct sniff_tcp*)(packet + SIZE_ETHERNET + size_ip);

        printf("src port: %d dest port: %d \n", tcp->th_sport, tcp->th_dport);
        fprintf(fp,"src port: %d dest port: %d \n", tcp->th_sport, tcp->th_dport);

        printf("src address: %s dest address: %s \n",  inet_ntoa(ip->ip_src),  inet_ntoa(ip->ip_dst));
        fprintf(fp,"src address: %s dest address: %s \n",  inet_ntoa(ip->ip_src),  inet_ntoa(ip->ip_dst));

        printf("seq number: %u ack number: %u \n", (unsigned int)tcp-> th_seq, (unsigned int)tcp->th_ack);
        fprintf(fp,"seq number: %u ack number: %u \n", (unsigned int)tcp-> th_seq, (unsigned int)tcp->th_ack);

        // Add two lines between packets
        printf("\n");
        fprintf(fp,"\n");
    }
    fclose (fp);
     return(0);
}

this is part of my result:

Packet # 1
Packet size: 74 bytes
Epoch Time: 1348895319:643493 seconds
src port: 20480 dest port: 15578
src address: 128.8.126.92 dest address: 128.8.126.92
seq number: 3071009507 ack number: 2490081174

Packet # 2
Packet size: 66 bytes
Epoch Time: 1348895319:643566 seconds
src port: 15578 dest port: 20480
src address: 192.168.5.162 dest address: 192.168.5.162
seq number: 2490081174 ack number: 3087786723

Packet # 3
Packet size: 207 bytes
Epoch Time: 1348895319:643720 seconds
src port: 15578 dest port: 20480
src address: 192.168.5.162 dest address: 192.168.5.162
seq number: 2490081174 ack number: 3087786723

Packet # 4
Packet size: 66 bytes
Epoch Time: 1348895320:127547 seconds
src port: 20480 dest port: 15578
src address: 128.8.126.92 dest address: 128.8.126.92
seq number: 3087786723 ack number: 560766870

Packet # 5
Packet size: 1514 bytes
Epoch Time: 1348895320:129417 seconds
src port: 20480 dest port: 15578
src address: 128.8.126.92 dest address: 128.8.126.92
seq number: 3087786723 ack number: 560766870

The ip address is the same even though i used src and dst ip address. The seq number and ack number seem to be too large. can anyone see what is causing my problem and how I can fix it. Thanks in advance.

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can you share the pcap dump? –  SparKot ॐ Oct 21 '12 at 16:17
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1 Answer

up vote 4 down vote accepted
  1. Are you sure you dump has only IP packets in it?
  2. The values are in network byte order. You'd need to use ntohl and ntohs to convert them.
  3. inet_ntoa to uses a static buffer so subsequent calls overwrite the value (hence the matched source and dest addresses).
share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the help, i fixed the ip address part. Do you know whats causing my seq number to be so large? –  help Oct 21 '12 at 18:23
    
The sequence numbers should be converted through ntohl. Bytes on the network are always in “network byte order” (i.e., big endian). Your machine may or may not be big endian (x86 machines are not), so the bytes need to be shuffled to produced the correct byte ordering. –  apmasell Oct 22 '12 at 1:44
    
(And, even then, don't assume the sequence numbers won't be large - sequence numbers can start at an arbitrary value in the initial SYN and the SYN+ACK response to it; it's the difference between sequence numbers that should correspond to the amount of data sent. If I byte-swap the sequence number of 3071009507, I get 3823242167.) –  Guy Harris Oct 22 '12 at 9:27
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