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Is there a standard way for a Web Server to determine what time zone offset a user is in?

Perhaps from an HTTP header? Or part of the user-agent description?

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2  
Ask the user. If you get the time zone from the user's computer, and it is set wrong, then what? –  Rob Williams Dec 2 '08 at 0:51
2  
Then the user probably doesn't care? –  agnoster Nov 11 '10 at 8:48
17  
You might consider making John Isaacks's the correct answer... His solution is a lot simpler, to put it lightly. –  catphive Apr 8 '11 at 20:49
    
I agree with catphive. The simplest answer should be The Answer –  Taryn East May 5 '13 at 0:26
    
@MartinArgerami: for posterity, the only sane way of dealing with time is keeping everything in UTC until the last possible moment because it avoids risks of mixups (since everything is in UTC, there's no need for most applications to be timezone and DST aware). Dates and times should ideally only be translated to a local timezone during display. Even though OP asked for a server-side solution, a client-side solution is much more appropriate. –  André Caron May 22 '13 at 15:52

21 Answers 21

up vote -1 down vote accepted

timezone.js:

function ajaxpage() {
    var url = "timezone.php";
    var visitortime = new Date();
    var time = visitortime.getTimezoneOffset()/60;
    var page_request = false;

    if (window.XMLHttpRequest) {
        page_request = new XMLHttpRequest();
    }
    else if (window.ActiveXObject) { 
        try {
            page_request = new ActiveXObject("Msxml2.XMLHTTP");
        }
        catch (e) {
            try{
                page_request = new ActiveXObject("Microsoft.XMLHTTP");
            } 
            catch (e) {
            }
        }
    }
    else {
        return false;
    }

    page_request.onreadystatechange = function() {
            loadpage(page_request, containerid);
    }

    if (bustcachevar) {
        bustcacheparameter=(url.indexOf("?")!=-1) ? "&"+new Date().getTime() : "?"+new Date().getTime();
    }

    page_request.open('GET', url+bustcacheparameter+"&time="+time, true);
    page_request.send(null);
}

function loadpage(page_request, containerid) {
    if (page_request.readyState == 4 && (page_request.status==200 || window.location.href.indexOf("http")==-1)) {
        document.write('<meta http-equiv="refresh" content="0;url=http://example.com/"/>');
    }
}

timezone.php:

<?php
session_start();
$_SESSION['time'] = $_GET['time'];
?>

When you want to use it add onLoad="ajaxpage(); to the body tag and it should cause the timezone to be stored in the PHP session variable $_SESSION['time']

Edit: P.S. This is untested.

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10  
The worst answer with high votes I've yet to see on SO. How hard is it to format JS correctly? –  Marc-André Lafortune Apr 28 '10 at 14:27
94  
This should not be the approved answer. –  simianarmy May 13 '10 at 19:53
13  
Horrific to document.write after load and then document.write a META reload tag instead of just redirect using script! –  mplungjan Jul 30 '10 at 13:05
6  
Since I keep getting downvoted for this answer even 4 years later, I want to point out that I +1'd simianarmy's comment here a long time ago, and I upvoted Ishmaeel's answer. –  UnkwnTech May 6 '12 at 6:20
9  
@UnkwnTech: I'll still downvote because the correct reaction would be to rewrite (or delete) your answer. At the very least, you should edit to give a big disclaimer at the start of the answer, and possibly redirect to an answer you find more appropriate. –  André Caron May 22 '13 at 15:48
-new Date().getTimezoneOffset()/60;

getTimezoneOffset() will subtract your time from GMT and return the number of minutes. So if you live in GMT-8, it will return 480. To put this into hours, divide by 60. Also, notice that the sign is the opposite of what you need -- it's calculating GMT's offset from your time zone, not your time zone's offset from GMT. To fix this, simply multiply by -1.

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1  
this is what makes the most sense to me. is there any reason this shouldn't be used or is everyone above just making the problem more difficult than they need to. –  jordanstephens Jun 28 '10 at 19:54
2  
What about users who use cell phones that have browsers without javascript support? I like the question, the user asks about HTTP headers, user agent... is there a way to make this work server side, as accurate as possible? –  Nischal Sep 9 '11 at 14:57
4  
This doesn't account for Daylight Saving Time / Summer Time, but the link posted by Joseph Lust does: stackoverflow.com/a/5492192/462162 –  arlomedia Apr 15 '12 at 19:36
9  
This doesn't always work for DST. Get timezone offset does exactly what it says. It get's the offset. A time ZONE is actually a geographical area. This won't work for daylight savings since you don't know which hemisphere the user lives in, or if their country even has daylight savings. Why not use this instead: >>> date.toTimeString() "15:46:04 GMT+1200 (New Zealand Standard Time)" –  Keyo Aug 30 '12 at 3:49
4  
I beg to differ with Keyo. The definition of getTimezoneOffset() (according to the ECMA standard ecma-international.org/ecma-262/5.1/#sec-15.9.5.26) is "Returns the difference between local time and UTC time in minutes." - in other words, it should take daylight savings into account. Mozilla's documentation says "Daylight saving time prevents this value from being a constant even for a given locale." –  xgretsch Dec 6 '13 at 11:24

The most popular (==standard?) way of determining the time zone I've seen around is simply asking the users themselves. If your website requires subscription, this could be saved in the users' profile data. For anon users, the dates could be displayed as UTC or GMT or some such.

I'm not trying to be a smart aleck. It's just that sometimes some problems have finer solutions outside of any programming context.

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22  
+1 - Definitely, if you care and it matters to your app's functionality, ask the user. –  DarkSquid Sep 1 '09 at 21:37
2  
What about when a user is downloading an .ics file that should have a start time specific to their location (e.g. 9-11am across the country)? They shouldn't HAVE to say what their time zone is imo. –  Marcy Sutton Jan 27 '11 at 21:57
7  
@Ishmaeel: but users do travel internationally and they shouldnt need to tell their timezone each time they login from some non-native timezone –  user01 Jul 22 '11 at 8:04
7  
Personally, if I traveled that much and the timestamps in my webapp were mission critical, I wouldn't trust the webapp to guess my current timezone via JS/ActiveX gimmicks. I would tell the webapp to display the timestamps in UTC/GMT. I also wouldn't be changing the timezone settings on my laptop each time I got off the plane, so the webapp would not have a chance to guess correctly anyway. –  Ishmaeel Jul 26 '11 at 13:02
2  
@gWiz OP is asking for a standard solution. This is pretty standard. –  Simon Apr 6 '12 at 10:26

Javascript is the easiest way to get the client's local time. I would suggest using an XMLHttpRequest to send back the local time, and if that fails, fall back to the timezone detected based on their IP address.

As far as geolocation, I've used MaxMind GeoIP on several projects and it works well, though I'm not sure if they provide timezone data. It's a service you pay for and they provide monthly updates to your database. They provide wrappers in several web languages.

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I have voted this answer up because the latitude and longitude obtained from databases like GeoIP (which has a free version available as of now) can be combined with databases that convert such a coordinate to a time zone. I think GeoNames has a latter such database. –  Peter O. Nov 20 '11 at 6:52
    
See also this question. –  Peter O. Dec 1 '11 at 7:11

There are no HTTP headers that will report the clients timezone so far although it has been suggested to include it in the HTTP specification.

If it was me, I would probably try to fetch the timezone using clientside JavaScript and then submit it to the server using Ajax or something.

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Using Unkwntech's approach, I wrote a function using jQuery and PHP. This is tested, and does work!

On the PHP page where you are want to have the timezone as a variable, have this snippet of code somewhere near the top of the page:

<?php    
    session_start();
    $timezone = $_SESSION['time'];
?>

This will read the session variable "time", which we are now about to create.

On the same page, in the , you need to first of all include jQuery:

<script type="text/javascript" src="http://code.jquery.com/jquery-latest.min.js"></script>

Also in the , below the jQuery, paste this:

<script type="text/javascript">
    $(document).ready(function() {
        if("<?php echo $timezone; ?>".length==0){
            var visitortime = new Date();
            var visitortimezone = "GMT " + -visitortime.getTimezoneOffset()/60;
            $.ajax({
                type: "GET",
                url: "http://domain.com/timezone.php",
                data: 'time='+ visitortimezone,
                success: function(){
                    location.reload();
                }
            });
        }
    });
</script>

You may or may not have noticed, but you need to change the url to your actual domain.

One last thing. You are probably wondering what the heck timezone.php is. Well, it is simply this: (create a new file called timezone.php and point to it with the above url)

<?php
    session_start();
    $_SESSION['time'] = $_GET['time'];
?>

If this works correctly, it will first load the page, execute the JavaScript, and reload the page. You will then be able to read the $timezone variable and use it to your pleasure! It returns the current UTC/GMT time zone offset (GMT -7) or whatever timezone you are in.

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i do like this, but i might have something that checks the current $_SESSION['time'] and only get the javascript to reload if its different –  Christopher Chase Sep 15 '11 at 4:59

Here is a robust JavaScript solution to determine the time zone the browser is in.

>>> var timezone = jstz.determine();
>>> timezone.name(); 
"Europe/London"

http://www.pageloom.com/automatic-timezone-detection-with-javascript

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4  
IMHO - This is the best answer. –  Matt Johnson Apr 22 '13 at 21:58

Here is a more complete way.

  1. Get the timezone offset for the user
  2. Test some days on DLS boundaries to determine if they are in a zone that uses DLS.

Getting TZ and DST from JS

share|improve this answer
    
This worked for me! Read the comments under the blog post for a couple updates to the code. –  arlomedia Apr 15 '12 at 19:35
    
This should be the accepted answer! –  Ryan Martin Jul 25 '12 at 21:39
    
This will still only return the standard offset for the time zone, such as +02:00. It will not give you enough information to determine the time zone of the user, such as Africa/Johannesburg or Europe/Istanbul. See the timezone tag wiki. –  Matt Johnson Jul 12 at 22:52

Anyone know of any services that will match IP to geographic location

Well, lucky for you that answer can be found on our very own stackoverflow website: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1033/ip-to-country

spoiler: http://www.hostip.info/use.html

share|improve this answer
    
I just went to that website and it was totally wrong :-/ –  Adam Lassek Aug 25 '10 at 2:46
    
@AdamLassek: possibly interesting information, but can you explain why? –  André Caron May 22 '13 at 15:43
    
@AndréCaron It says I'm in Irvine, CA when in fact I am actually in Omaha, NE. –  Adam Lassek May 24 '13 at 19:58
    
@AdamLassek OK, so it works for you, but you have nothing to support it being totally wrong, then. –  André Caron May 27 '13 at 11:59
    
@AndréCaron It's totally wrong for me, so I am advising skepticism of that site's accuracy. –  Adam Lassek May 29 '13 at 22:35

The magic all seems to be in

visitortime.getTimezoneOffset()

That's cool, I didn't know about that. Does it work in IE, etc? From there you should be able to use JS to ajax, set cookies, whatever. I'd probably go the cookie route myself.

You'll need to allow the user to change it though. We tried to use geolocation (via maxmind) to do this a while ago, and it was wrong reasonably often - enough to make it not worth doing, so we just let the user set it in their profile, and show a notice to users who haven't set theirs yet.

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If you happen to be using OpenID for authentication, Simple Registration Extension would solve the problem for authenticated users (You'll need to convert from tz to numeric).

Another option would be to infer the time zone from the user agent's country preference. This is a somewhat crude method (won't work for en-US), but makes a good approximation.

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With PHP date function you will get the date time of server on which site is located. The only way to get user time is to use JavaScript.

But I suggest you to, if your site have registration required then best way is to ask user while registration as compulsory field. You can list various time zones in register page and save that in database. After this if user login to site then you can set default time zone for that session as per users’ selected time zone. You can set any specific time zone using PHP function date_default_timezone_set. This set the specified time zone for users.

Basically users’ time zone is goes to client side, so we must use JavaScript for this.

Below is the script to get users’ time zone using PHP and JavaScript.

<?php
#http://www.php.net/manual/en/timezones.php List of Time Zones
function showclienttime()
{
if(!isset($_COOKIE['GMT_bias']))
{
?>
<script type="text/javascript">
var Cookies = {};
Cookies.create = function (name, value, days) {
if (days) {
var date = new Date();
date.setTime(date.getTime() + (days * 24 * 60 * 60 * 1000));
var expires = "; expires=" + date.toGMTString();
} else {
var expires = "";
}
document.cookie = name + "=" + value + expires + "; path=/";
this[name] = value;
}
var now = new Date();
Cookies.create("GMT_bias",now.getTimezoneOffset(),1);
window.location = "<?php echo $_SERVER['PHP_SELF'];?>";
</script>
<?php
} else {
$fct_clientbias = $_COOKIE['GMT_bias'];
}
$fct_servertimedata = gettimeofday();
$fct_servertime = $fct_servertimedata['sec'];
$fct_serverbias = $fct_servertimedata['minuteswest'];
$fct_totalbias = $fct_serverbias – $fct_clientbias;
$fct_totalbias = $fct_totalbias * 60;
$fct_clienttimestamp = $fct_servertime + $fct_totalbias;
$fct_time = time();
$fct_year = strftime("%Y", $fct_clienttimestamp);
$fct_month = strftime("%B", $fct_clienttimestamp);
$fct_day = strftime("%d", $fct_clienttimestamp);
$fct_hour = strftime("%I", $fct_clienttimestamp);
$fct_minute = strftime("%M", $fct_clienttimestamp);
$fct_second = strftime("%S", $fct_clienttimestamp);
$fct_am_pm = strftime("%p", $fct_clienttimestamp);
echo $fct_day.", ".$fct_month." ".$fct_year." ( ".$fct_hour.":".$fct_minute.":".$fct_second." ".$fct_am_pm." )";
}
showclienttime();
?>

But as per my point of view, it’s better to ask to the users if registration is mandatory in your project.

share|improve this answer

Here is an article (with source code) that explains how to determine and use localized time in an ASP.NET (VB.NET, C#) application:

It's About Time

In short, the described approach relies on the JavaScript getTimezoneOffset function, which returns the value that is saved in the session cookie and used by code-behind to adjust time values between GMT and local time. The nice thing is that the user does not need to specify the time zone (the code does it automatically). There is more involved (this is why I link to the article), but provided code makes it really easy to use. I suspect that you can convert the logic to PHP and other languages (as long as you understand ASP.NET).

share|improve this answer
1  
The link is dead. I think this is the alternative link: devproconnections.com/article/aspnet2/it-s-about-time-122778 –  Gan Mar 21 '13 at 3:56
1  
The article is available as PDF form here too: app.box.com/shared/bfvvmidtyg –  Ivaylo Slavov Oct 7 '13 at 8:41

javascript:

function maketimus(timestampz)
{
    var linktime = new Date(timestampz * 1000);
    var linkday = linktime.getDate();
    var freakingmonths=new Array();
    freakingmonths[0]="jan";
    freakingmonths[1]="feb";
    freakingmonths[2]="mar";
    freakingmonths[3]="apr";
    freakingmonths[4]="may";
    freakingmonths[5]="jun";
    freakingmonths[6]="jul";
    freakingmonths[7]="aug";
    freakingmonths[8]="sep";
    freakingmonths[9]="oct";
    freakingmonths[10]="nov";
    freakingmonths[11]="dec";
    var linkmonthnum = linktime.getMonth();
    var linkmonth = freakingmonths[linkmonthnum];
    var linkyear = linktime.getFullYear();
    var linkhour = linktime.getHours();
    var linkminute = linktime.getMinutes();
    if (linkminute < 10)
    {linkminute = "0" + linkminute;}
    var fomratedtime = linkday + linkmonth + linkyear + " " + linkhour + ":" + linkminute + "h";
    return fomratedtime;
}    

simply provide your times in UNIX Timestamp format to this function, javascript already knows the timezone of the user.

like this:

php:

echo '<script type="text/javascript">
var eltimio = maketimus('.$unix_timestamp_ofshiz.');
document.write(eltimio);
</script><noscript>pls enable javascript</noscript>';

this will always show the times correctly based on the timezone the person has set on his computer clock, no need to ask anything to anyone and save it into places thank god!

share|improve this answer

I still have not seen a detailed answer here that gets the time zone. You shouldn't need to geocode by IP address or use PHP (lol) or incorrectly guess from an offset.

Firstly a time zone is not just an offset from GMT. It is an area of land in which the time rules are set by local standards. Some countries have daylight savings, and will switch on DST at differing times. It's usually important to get the actual zone, not just the current offset.

If you intend to store this timezone, for instance in user preferences you want the zone and not just the offset. For realtime conversions it won't matter much.

Now, to get the time zone with javascript you can use this:

>> new Date().toTimeString();
"15:46:04 GMT+1200 (New Zealand Standard Time)"
//Use some regular expression to extract the time.

However I found it easier to simply use this robust plugin which returns the Olsen formatted timezone:

https://github.com/scottwater/jquery.detect_timezone

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Don't use IP address to definitively determine location (and hense timezone)-- that's because with NAT, Proxies (increasingly popular), and VPNs, IP addresses do not necessarily realistically reflect the user's actual location, but the location at which the servers implementing those protocols reside.

Similar to how Area Codes are no longer useful for locating a telephone user, given the popularity of Number Portability.

IP and other techniques shown above are useful for suggesting a default that the user can adjust/correct.

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Easy, just use the JavaScript getTimezoneOffset function like so:

-new Date().getTimezoneOffset()/60;
share|improve this answer
1  
This is a Javascript function, not a PHP function. –  cincodenada Feb 16 '13 at 1:05
    
Also, it only returns the current time zone offset - not the time zone. See the timezone tag wiki. –  Matt Johnson Jul 12 at 22:45

To submit it as an HTTP header on AJAX requests with jQuery

$.ajaxSetup({
    beforeSend: function(xhr, settings) {
        xhr.setRequestHeader("X-TZ-Offset", -new Date().getTimezoneOffset()/60);
    }
});
share|improve this answer
    
This only returns the current time zone offset - not the time zone. See the timezone tag wiki. –  Matt Johnson Jul 12 at 22:47

Here's how I do it. This will set the PHP default timezone to the user's local timezone. Just paste the following on the top of all your pages:

<?php
session_start();
if(!isset($_SESSION['timezone']))
{
    if(!isset($_REQUEST['offset']))
    {
    ?>
        <script>
        var d = new Date()
        var offset= -d.getTimezoneOffset()/60;
        location.href = "<?php echo $_SERVER['PHP_SELF']; ?>?offset="+offset;
        </script>
        <?php   
    }
    else
    {
        $zonelist = array('Kwajalein' => -12.00, 'Pacific/Midway' => -11.00, 'Pacific/Honolulu' => -10.00, 'America/Anchorage' => -9.00, 'America/Los_Angeles' => -8.00, 'America/Denver' => -7.00, 'America/Tegucigalpa' => -6.00, 'America/New_York' => -5.00, 'America/Caracas' => -4.30, 'America/Halifax' => -4.00, 'America/St_Johns' => -3.30, 'America/Argentina/Buenos_Aires' => -3.00, 'America/Sao_Paulo' => -3.00, 'Atlantic/South_Georgia' => -2.00, 'Atlantic/Azores' => -1.00, 'Europe/Dublin' => 0, 'Europe/Belgrade' => 1.00, 'Europe/Minsk' => 2.00, 'Asia/Kuwait' => 3.00, 'Asia/Tehran' => 3.30, 'Asia/Muscat' => 4.00, 'Asia/Yekaterinburg' => 5.00, 'Asia/Kolkata' => 5.30, 'Asia/Katmandu' => 5.45, 'Asia/Dhaka' => 6.00, 'Asia/Rangoon' => 6.30, 'Asia/Krasnoyarsk' => 7.00, 'Asia/Brunei' => 8.00, 'Asia/Seoul' => 9.00, 'Australia/Darwin' => 9.30, 'Australia/Canberra' => 10.00, 'Asia/Magadan' => 11.00, 'Pacific/Fiji' => 12.00, 'Pacific/Tongatapu' => 13.00);
        $index = array_keys($zonelist, $_REQUEST['offset']);
        $_SESSION['timezone'] = $index[0];
    }
}
date_default_timezone_set($_SESSION['timezone']);

//rest of your code goes here
?>
share|improve this answer

Try this php code

<?php  
$ip = $_SERVER['REMOTE_ADDR'];
$json = file_get_contents("http://api.easyjquery.com/ips/?ip=".$ip."&full=true");
$json = json_decode($json,true);
$timezone = $json['LocalTimeZone'];
?>
share|improve this answer
    
Dead link (now directs to a godaddy parking page) –  PaulProgrammer Apr 9 at 6:12

A simple way to do it is by using:

new Date().getTimezoneOffset();
share|improve this answer
3  
Why did you repost an identical answer (by John Isaacks) from 2 years ago: stackoverflow.com/a/1809974/836407 ? –  chown Jan 30 '12 at 1:01
    
Also, it only returns the current time zone offset - not the time zone. See the timezone tag wiki. –  Matt Johnson Jul 12 at 22:46

protected by AVD Jul 2 '13 at 3:03

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