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here's a simple OpenCL Matrix Multiplication kernel which is driving me crazy:

By the way I am using pyopencl.

__kernel void matrixMul(  __global int* C,
                          __global int* A,
                          __global int* B,
                          int wA, int wB){

                int row = get_global_id(1); //2D Threas ID x
                int col = get_global_id(0); //2D Threas ID y

                //Perform dot-product accumulated into value
                int value = 0;
                for ( int k = 0; k < wA; k++ ){
                    value += A[row*wA + k] * B[k*wB+col];
                }
                C[row*wA+col] = value; //Write to the device memory
            }

Where (inputs)

A = [72 45
     75 61]
B = [26 53 
     46 76]
wA = wB = 2

Output I am getting:

Sometime I get:

C = [3942 0
     0 5472]

Else I get:

C = [3942 7236
     3312 5472]

But the output should be:

C = [3942 7236
     4756 8611]

I don't know what mistake I am making here. I have spent the entire day with no luck.

Please help me with this

Here's the full python code:

import pyopencl as cl
import numpy as np
import os

ORDER = 2
LEN = ORDER*ORDER
ctx = cl.create_some_context()

commandQueue = cl.CommandQueue( ctx )

A = np.array((72, 45, 75, 61), dtype = np.int32)
B = np.array((26, 53, 46, 76), dtype = np.int32)
C = np.empty_like(A)

in_buf1 = cl.Buffer( ctx, cl.mem_flags.READ_ONLY | cl.mem_flags.COPY_HOST_PTR,
                 hostbuf = A )
in_buf2 = cl.Buffer( ctx, cl.mem_flags.READ_ONLY | cl.mem_flags.COPY_HOST_PTR,
                 hostbuf = B )
out_buf = cl.Buffer( ctx, cl.mem_flags.WRITE_ONLY, C.nbytes )

kernelSrc1 = """__kernel void
            matrixMul(  /*const int Mdim,
                        const int Ndim,
                        const int Pdim,*/
                        __global int* C,
                        __global int* A,
                        __global int* B,
                        int wA, int wB)
           {
                int row = get_global_id(1); //2D Threas ID x
                int col = get_global_id(0); //2D Threas ID y                

                //Perform dot-product accumulated into value
                int value = 0;
                for ( int k = 0; k < wA; k++ ){
                    value += A[row*wA + k] * B[k*wB+col];
                }
                C[row*wA+col] = value; //Write to the device memory
            }"""

program1 = cl.Program(ctx, kernelSrc1 ).build()
event1 = program1.matrixMul( commandQueue, (LEN, ), None,
                     out_buf, in_buf1, in_buf2, np.int32(ORDER), np.int32(ORDER));
event1.wait()

cl.enqueue_copy(commandQueue, C, out_buf)
print C

I am using Python 2.7.x, pyopencl 2012.1, AMD APP SDK

share|improve this question
2  
Looks good to me. Are you sure you're reading the values back correctly (e.g. try "C[row*wA+col]=1;" and see if you get C=[1,1,1,1])? –  Ian Mallett Oct 21 '12 at 18:08
    
@Ian Mallett: I did what you told and I am getting C=[1, 1, 1, 1]. So I guess its not reading back the values. By the way, I edited my post to the actual wrong answer I am getting, I mean I am getting c[1,0] = 0 and not 4756. Sorry I dint check before posting the question. –  Yash Oct 21 '12 at 18:30
    
Can you post the python code too, so we can see how you are calling it? –  K. Brafford Oct 21 '12 at 18:32
    
@K. Bradfford: I have edited my post to include the full python code. –  Yash Oct 21 '12 at 18:44
1  
Expected output's first value should be 3942, not 3943. –  Ian Mallett Oct 21 '12 at 19:03

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You are setting your global size argument incorrectly. Since you are using two dimensions of global size in your kernel, you need to set your global size to (ORDER,ORDER). When you change it to that, you get:

[3942 7236
 4756 8611]
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much. I got the answer. But I have one more question, I am using the matrix width size 'wA' and 'wB' to access 1D array as matrix hence why is not working if I pass global size as 1D array? –  Yash Oct 22 '12 at 7:07
1  
Because you are using the X and Y dimensions in your kernel: int row = get_global_id(1); int col = get_global_id(0); If you really wanted to set your global size to (LEN,1), you would need to calculate your row,col values in your kernel something like this: int row = get_global_id(0) / wB; int col = get_global_id(0) % wA; –  K. Brafford Oct 22 '12 at 10:34
1  
However that would be less maintainable. You would be better off if you kept accessing your data in the kernel the way you are doing it now, use (ORDER, ORDER) as your global size, and change your numpy array creation to this: A = np.array(((72, 45), (75, 61)), dtype = np.int32); B = np.array(((26, 53), (46, 76)), dtype = np.int32) so that everything matches up when you and others read your code. –  K. Brafford Oct 22 '12 at 10:37
1  
BTW the reason that the kernel still works when you declare the np array as a 1D array, and access it like a 2D array in your kernel is that both arrays look exactly the same in memory as far as both numpy and the kernel are concerned. They are both just 4 32-bit bytes in memory. –  K. Brafford Oct 22 '12 at 10:38
1  
Thanks a lot. You helped me more than you think you did cos the next step for me will be to implement Hausdorff Distance in OpenCL for my project and I needed to understand the basics of OpenCL for it. I have been on this for 3 continuous days.....Now am at peace there is a lot more to learn.... –  Yash Oct 22 '12 at 11:05

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