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I need help in something really simple, which C++ makes very difficult. I created a class, lattice, with the aim to initialize and treat a matrix. There are the following private members:

private unsigned dim;
private double matrix [dim][dim];

I would like to initialize the variable dim in the constructor of the class through a parameter, but the compiler continue to return errors. I tried to make dim public and static and initializing it in the main program, but there are still problems. How could I create this simple class?

Moreover, I also implemented some methods in the class in order to update the values of the matrix. Is it true that, initializing an object of the class in a main program and then using its "updating" methods, the values of the matrix are stored only once?

Thank you for your help.

share|improve this question
    
If you need the actual array, you'll need a template parameter. – chris Oct 21 '12 at 17:04
    
Are you from Java? – texasbruce Oct 21 '12 at 17:06
1  
you need dynamic allocation of your array since dim has no value in the line private double matrix[dim][dim]. Use std::vector<std::vector<double> > or a double ** for matrix – stefan Oct 21 '12 at 17:07
up vote 2 down vote accepted

There are (at least) three ways to create such a class:

  • with a template

    template<size_t dim>
    class Matrix
    {
       private:
         double matrix[dim][dim];
    }
    
  • with the use of built in types such as std::vector (e.g. valarray would work too)

    #include <vector>
    class Matrix
    {
       private:
         size_t dim;
         std::vector<std::vector<double> > matrix;
       public:
         Matrix(size_t dim_) : dim(dim_), matrix()
         {
           matrix.resize(dim);
           for ( size_t i = 0; i < dim; ++i )
              matrix[i].resize(dim);
         }
    }
    
  • with the use of plain arrays (I do not recommend that!)

    class Matrix
    {
       private:
         size_t dim;
         double** matrix;
       public:
         Matrix(size_t dim_) : dim(dim_), matrix()
         {
           matrix = new double*[dim];
           for ( size_t i = 0; i < dim; ++i )
              matrix[i] = new double[dim];
         }
         ~Matrix() // you need a destructor!
         {
           for ( size_t i = 0; i < dim; ++i )
              delete [] matrix[i];
           delete [] matrix;
         }
    }
    
share|improve this answer
    
What speaks against the last form? If the Matrix class is the data handler why add in another layer of abstraction (indirection) with vector? ANd against the first option in this case: Templates can only be changed at compiletime, thus e.g. for a matrix calculator templates would be a bad choice. – ted Oct 21 '12 at 18:07
    
My recommendation is std::vector for two reasons: First, template sucks, you're right. Second: Dealing with pointers confuses many and is error-prone. if one does not correctly implement copy constructors and such stuff this will horribly fail and confuse (beginners) even more. std::vector usage just works. From the technical standpoint there is no argument against arrays. – stefan Oct 21 '12 at 18:20
    
In my ignorance, I agree with stefan. I find the code with vectors much more easier to understand than the third. :) – Pippo Oct 21 '12 at 20:20
    
@stefan: thank you for the insights and the reminder (would have forgotten the copy constructor...) – ted Oct 22 '12 at 7:35

Use template:

template<int dim>
class Lattice{
    double matrix[dim][dim];
}

and initialize dim in the constructor:

Lattice<10> sampleLattice;

Then dim = 10;

You might use pointer, or vector of a vector, but template is what I would use because it is less confusing and convenient.

BTW you will have to use private: and public: (with colon).

share|improve this answer

I'm guessing your "problems" are the compiler complaining about array initialization with non const size.

You should do something like this:

class MyClass {
public:
    MyClass(unsigned pdim);
private:
    MyClass();
    const unsigned dim;
    const double matrix [dim][dim];
};

MyClass::MyClass(unsigned pdim) : dim(pdim) {
    // Other things
}

You can have const members inside a class but they need to be initialized using the : syntax.

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