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I have this two methods :

Cluster.prototype.initiate_xhr_request = function(url, callback) {
    var self = this,
        request = (Modernizr.test_xmlhttprequest) ? new ActiveXObject('Microsoft.XMLHTTP') : new XMLHttpRequest();
    request.onreadystatechange = function() {
        if(request.readyState === 4) {
            switch(request.status) {
                case 200:
                    callback.apply(request,[ request.statusText ]);
                    break;
                case 400:
                    callback.apply(request,[ request.statusText ]);
                    break;
                default:
                    break;
            };
        } else 
            console.log('An error occured during the XHR request');
        }
    };
    request.open("HEAD", url, false);
    request.send();
};

Cluster.prototype.operations = {
    '&&': function(array){ 
        return array.reduce(function(previousValue, currentValue, index, array){
             return previousValue && currentValue;
         })
     },
    '||' : function(array){
        return array.reduce(function(previousValue, currentValue, index, array){
            return this.initiate_xhr_request(previousValue) || currentValue;
        })}
};

EDIT : The methods are invoked as it follows :

Cluster.prototype.calculate = function(operation, array){
    return this.operations[operation](array);
};

/* call the calculate function */

this.calculate('&&', some_array);

Obviously, this line this.initiate_xhr_request(previousValue) won't work. I kept trying to find a good solution of doing what I'm trying to do there, but I couldn't find one (: Is there a way of doing that and keeping the structure I have the same ?

share|improve this question
    
Where/how are the "&&" and "||" methods invoked? –  I Hate Lazy Oct 21 '12 at 18:03
    
@user1689607 ~ just added an example (: –  rolandjitsu Oct 21 '12 at 18:10

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can use .call or .apply to manually set the this value of the method you're invoking.

Here I set the this value of this.operations[operation] to that in the current lexical environment. (Using .apply instead of .call would do the same, but would take your array and pass its members as individual args, which you don't seem to want.)

Cluster.prototype.calculate = function(operation, array){
    return this.operations[operation].call(this, array);
};

Now in those methods, the this value will be what you expect, except that you need to make sure the this value is retained in then .reduce() callback for the "||" method.

The classic way to do that is to keep a variable reference to the outer lexical environment, an reference that variable in the callback:

Cluster.prototype.operations = {
    '&&' : ...,
    '||' : function(array){
        var self = this;
        return array.reduce(function(previousValue, currentValue, index, array){
            return self.initiate_xhr_request(previousValue) || currentValue;
        })}
};

But a more modern way is to use Function.prototype.bind to create a new function with the this value manually bound:

Cluster.prototype.operations = {
    '&&' : ...,
    '||' : function(array){
        return array.reduce(function(previousValue, currentValue, index, array){
            return this.initiate_xhr_request(previousValue) || currentValue;
        }.bind(this))}
};
share|improve this answer
    
bind doesnt work in a lot of browsers , so beware. self = this is a more portable solution. –  mpm Oct 21 '12 at 18:22
    
@camus: True, but neither does .reduce, so I'm guessing modern environments are targeted, or there's already shims applied. –  I Hate Lazy Oct 21 '12 at 18:24
    
btw is there a fallback or polyfill for .reduce() in browsers like IE8 or less ? –  rolandjitsu Oct 21 '12 at 18:28
1  
@Roland: Mozilla Developer Network has polyfills. Just Google "MDN Array.prototype.reduce", and you'll find the relevant MDN page. Unfortunately I've noticed minor errors in many of their Array polyfills, so I would double check it against the spec, and make corrections as needed –  I Hate Lazy Oct 21 '12 at 18:33
1  
@Roland: Unfortunately it's a wiki format. Most of the errors I've noted are minor, but real... for example they way they handle the optional context argument for most Array methods will produce a result different from the spec in some cases. In the case of .reduce, there is no context argument, but it doesn't handle a sparse Array properly for the first iteration. I've looked through revision history of some of the shims, and have seen that many used to be implemented correctly. Because of this, I won't spend the time to fix them, because my fixes may just be overwritten later. –  I Hate Lazy Oct 21 '12 at 18:44

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