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I wrote an answer for this question: New background according to url, the code I posted in my answer was to check a URL for the presence of a particular string and, if it was there, change the background-image of a given element.

So! Me being me, I thought I'd try and avoid jQuery and go for a more traditional vanilla JavaScript approach with the following:

var images = {
    'halloween' : '/images/newbackground.jpg',
    'christmas' : '/images/xmasbackground.jpg'
};

var url = document.location.href,
    elem = document.getElementById('elementThatYouWantToStyle');

for (var keyword in images){
    if (images.hasOwnProperty(keyword) && url.indexOf(keyword) !== -1) {
        elem.style.backgroundImage = images[keyword];
    }
}

Source.

Which I then thought I'd convert to a functional approach, so it became this:

var images = {
    'halloween': 'http://davidrhysthomas.co.uk/img/dexter.png',
    'christmas': 'http://davidrhysthomas.co.uk/img/mandark.png'
};

function setBG(el, map, url) {
    if (!el || !map) {
        return false;
    }
    else {
        var url = url || document.location.href,
            el = el.nodeType == 1 ? el : document.getElementById(el);
        for (var keyword in map) {
            if (map.hasOwnProperty(keyword) && url.indexOf(keyword) !== -1) {
                el.style.backgroundImage = encodeURIComponent(map[keyword]);
            }
        }
    }
}

setBG('one', images, 'http://some.domain.com/with/halloween.jpg');
setBG(document.getElementById('two'), images, 'http://some.domain.com/with/christmas.jpg');

JS Fiddle demo.

Now, if I add a console.log() to the if assessment within the for...in loop it shows that we're getting into the loop, and the console suggests that I have an accurate reference to the DOM node, the images object, the URL (as passed into the function) and am getting the correct value from the object.

The following line, however, in which I attempt to set the el.style.backgroundImage property, does not work (this is true whether or not I wrap the map[keyword] in the encodeURIComponent() or not albeit I've linked only to the attempt in which I did. So: what's the obvious flaw in my logic? Why is el.style.backgroundImage not being set?

(Incidentally JS Lint, at JS Fiddle, seems happy with it (other than the redefinition of existing variables (url and el) done in order to have a fall-back/default).

share|improve this question
    
You know how, sometimes, you just know you've overlooked something in your sleep-deprived and addled state? =| –  David Thomas Oct 21 '12 at 19:27
1  
Also, as apparently the "re-declaring" of vars seems to throw off even some experienced programmers, I've complemented my answer with yet another paragraph about that and a link to JavaScript Scoping and Hoisting - a really awesome read. –  Fabrício Matté Oct 21 '12 at 21:42

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You are declaring a local variable url with var url that already defined as an argument url and you also need to use the form url(http:/xxxx).

Change to this (removed var in front of url and added the url() around the url):

function setBG(el, map, url) {
    if (!el || !map) {
        return false;
    }
    else {
        url = url || document.location.href;
        el = el.nodeType == 1 ? el : document.getElementById(el);
        for (var keyword in map) {
            if (map.hasOwnProperty(keyword) && url.indexOf(keyword) !== -1) {
                el.style.backgroundImage = 'url(' + map[keyword] + ')';
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
@DavidThomas - I removed the` var in front of var url and I added url() around the actual URL for the style value. –  jfriend00 Oct 21 '12 at 19:31
    
Agh! I knew it'd be something silly and scope-related...thank you kindly, +1 and an impending acceptance coming your way! Thanks =) –  David Thomas Oct 21 '12 at 19:32
    
The extra var declaration makes absolutely no difference. And not to be cranky but I was the first one to address the real issue & provide an working fiddle. –  Fabrício Matté Oct 21 '12 at 19:33
    
Actually that seems to be true (which surprises me, about the var, why doesn't it make a difference..?) –  David Thomas Oct 21 '12 at 19:34
1  
Because the var keyword simply tells the interpreter that the variable belongs to that scope. Re-declaring a var that is already declared in the same scope makes no difference. –  Fabrício Matté Oct 21 '12 at 19:35

An URL is not a valid backgroundImage value unless you wrap it in a url().

el.style.backgroundImage = 'url(' + map[keyword] + ')';

Fiddle


Also, you should not encodeURIcomponent the whole URL, otherwise it will encode even the protocol's : and the /'s, resulting in a 404 as (due to the now lack of protocol) being interpreted as a relative URL:

GET http://fiddle.jshell.net/_display/http%3A%2F%2Fdavidrhysthomas.co.uk%2Fimg%2Fdexter.png 404 (Not Found)

Instead, to more safely encode a full URI you can use encodeURI:

el.style.backgroundImage = 'url("' + encodeURI(map[keyword]) + '")';

Fiddle

Note: MDN mentions that encodeURI may not work as expected in different browsers with GET requests, that is, URLs including query strings. I couldn't reproduce that problem though.


Also as noted by @jfriend00, the var keyword before url is unnecessary, as it already belongs to the function scope due to being declared as a formal parameter. Read more: JavaScript Scoping and Hoisting

share|improve this answer
    
Moving the conversation over to your answer. And no, it didn't; that's what I meant by 'I discovered that for myself also, when playing.' Though the subject of that sentence wasn't clear; I found, as did Jared (in the other comment thread) that it returns a 404. So I removed it. –  David Thomas Oct 21 '12 at 19:45
    
Alright, thanks for the confirmation. Guess I'll add a paragraph about that for the sake of completeness. –  Fabrício Matté Oct 21 '12 at 19:46
1  
@DavidThomas Added a paragraph about encodeURIComponent vs encodeURI, which may be useful for your function. –  Fabrício Matté Oct 21 '12 at 19:58

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