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How would I calculate a date's quarter begin/end dates? If example if I give the method "2012-10-11" I would like back: { :begin_date => '2012-10-01', :end_date => '2012-12-31' }

def quarter_dates(date = Date.today)
  # TODO...
  return {
    :begin_date => begin_date,
    :end_date => end_date
  }
end
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Here are the quarters that I am referring to - en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calendar_year –  kyledecot Oct 21 '12 at 19:33
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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

ActiveSupport provides beginning_of_quarter and end_of_quarter for just this:

require 'active_support/core_ext/date/calculations'

def quarter_dates(date = Date.today)
  {
    :begin_date => date.beginning_of_quarter,
    :end_date => date.end_of_quarter
  }
end
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4  
You might show the poster how to use just the date extensions needed, instead of all of ActiveSupport's core extensions. –  the Tin Man Oct 21 '12 at 20:23
    
Yes, I should have do that. @AndrewMarshall thanks for the update. –  KARASZI István Oct 22 '12 at 12:55
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Something like this should work :

def quarter_dates(date = Date.today)
  start_month = date.month - (date.month - 1) % 3
  start_date  = Date.new(date.year, start_month, 1)

  {
    :begin_date => start_date,
    :end_date   => (start_date >> 3) - 1
  }
end

To help you understand, see this bit :

(1..12).map { |month| month - (month - 1) % 3 }
#=> [1, 1, 1, 4, 4, 4, 7, 7, 7, 10, 10, 10]

The operator >> on a date will return the date n months later and the - 1 will return the date one day before.

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(month - 1) / 3 + 1 would be simpler and more intuitive. –  sawa Oct 21 '12 at 20:23
    
It's not the same, this will give 1, 2, 3 and 4 for each quarter while the one in the answer returns 1, 4, 7 and 10 for each quarter. So you directly get the start month. –  thoferon Oct 21 '12 at 21:12
    
Sorry. I should have written (month - 1) / 3 * 3 + 1. –  sawa Oct 21 '12 at 21:45
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Reference:

Using quarter date ranges provided here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calendar_year

  1. First quarter: from the beginning of January to the end of March
  2. Second quarter: from the beginning of April to the end of June
  3. Third quarter: from the beginning of July to the end of September
  4. Fourth quarter: from the beginning of October to the end of December

Date & Range Syntax:

An simple solution would use some logic like this:

# Is today's date in Q4?

(Date.parse('2012-10-01')..Date.parse('2012-12-31')).cover?(Date.today)

Solution:

Following this logic:

def quarter_dates(date = Date.today)

  4.times do |i|
    start = Date.parse("#{date.year}-#{i*3+1}-01")
    if (start..(start >> 3 - 1)).cover?(date)
      return {
        :begin_date => start,
        :end_date => (start >> 3) - 1
      }
    end
  end

end

A bit dirty in places, but I figure it should give you a head start.

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