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I have an e-commerce shop and once a week the warehouse puts in another table only products that have changed their price. How to update the prices in the first table with the new prices of the selected products in the other table? Feel free to use also some php if it's not possible to do with mysql only.

I tried this command but when the SELECT founds no matches it changes my original prices to 0 instead of leaving them untouched.

UPDATE product_catalogue pc
SET pc.price = (SELECT new_price
                FROM product_catalogue_updated pcu
                WHERE pc.product_id = pcu.product_id)
share|improve this question
    
use a where in the update –  Jan Dvorak Oct 21 '12 at 19:36
    
"where" exactly? ;) –  alessandroweb Oct 21 '12 at 19:40

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is one possible solution:

UPDATE product_catalogue pc
SET pc.price = (
  SELECT new_price
  FROM product_catalogue_updated pcu
  WHERE pc.product_id = pcu.product_id
)
WHERE pc.product_id IN (
  SELECT pcu.product_id FROM product_catalogue_updated pcu
)

This might work as well:

This doesn't work (but would be nice):

UPDATE product_catalogue pc
SET pc.price = (
  SELECT new_price
  FROM product_catalogue_updated pcu
  WHERE pc.product_id = pcu.product_id
) AS pprice
WHERE pprice IS NOT NULL
share|improve this answer
1  
The first solution works perfectly. The second one gives me this error: "#1064 - You have an error in your SQL syntax; check the manual that corresponds to your MySQL server version for the right syntax to use near 'AS pprice WHERE pprice IS NOT NULL' at line 6" but it's not important because my problem is solved with the first one. –  alessandroweb Oct 21 '12 at 19:53
UPDATE product_catalogue pc,product_catalogue_updated pcu 
SET pc.price = pcu.new_price 
WHERE pc.product_id = pcu.product_id

BACKUP YOUR DB BEFORE USING THIS QUERY

share|improve this answer
    
You don't seem very confident with your own answer :-) –  Jan Dvorak Oct 21 '12 at 19:42
    
No. I confident in my answer. It saves author from mistakes if he had forgotten something when asked the question –  Mikhail Oct 21 '12 at 19:47
    
Note that I still prefer explicit JOINs over the comma operator :-) –  Jan Dvorak Oct 21 '12 at 19:49
    
Why? What is the difference? –  Mikhail Oct 21 '12 at 19:53
    
Thanks guys both of you for the help. –  alessandroweb Oct 21 '12 at 19:56

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