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I am still earning Perl , and know I have quite a way to go, I've been reading the Perl books from O'Reilly and also taking some classes on Udemy, and even went through the Lynda course on Perl.

I am trying to write a backup program to scratch a need I have, but I seem to be having a really hard time with one of my functions.

sub list {
    my @zfs_temp = `zfs list`;
    foreach (@zfs_temp) {
    my ($name, $used, $available, $refer, $mount) = split(/\s+/);
    push(@name, $name);
    push(@used, $used);
    push(@available, $available);
    push(@refer, $refer);
    push(@mount, $mount);
#    print "@name, @used, @available, @refer, @mount\n";
    return (@name, @used, @available, @refer, @mount);
    }
}

It seems that I am only getting back one line , and I'm really not sure what I am doing wrong, could anyone point me in the right direction?

Thank You

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4  
note also that you probably want to return references to those arrays so that you can keep them separate later: return (\@name, \@used, \@available, \@refer, \@mount); Your return will now be 5 values, each containing an array reference. If you do not do this, your return will be a concatenation of all those arrays into one big list; probably not what you mean. See perldoc perlreftut –  Joel Berger Oct 21 '12 at 20:31
    
Hello Joel, You are correct, that is actually what I want it to do. I wanted to return the values as arrays that I can manipulate further on down the road. Thanks! –  Roncioiu Oct 22 '12 at 1:06
    
Glad to help! Have fun Perling! –  Joel Berger Oct 22 '12 at 2:30
    
Don't edit a question just to add (Solved) to the end of the title. –  Brad Gilbert Oct 30 '12 at 0:17
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3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Your problem here is that you're returning prematurely.

sub list {
    my @zfs_temp = `zfs list`;
    my (@name, @used, @available, @refer, @mount); #declared ahead of time and scoped appropriately 
    foreach (@zfs_temp) {
        my ($name, $used, $available, $refer, $mount) = split(/\s+/);
        push(@name, $name);
        push(@used, $used);
        push(@available, $available);
        push(@refer, $refer);
        push(@mount, $mount);
    }
    return (@name, @used, @available, @refer, @mount); #note how it's outside the loop now

 }

Otherwise you would simply return after going through your loop once, probably not what you want.

Additionally you should declare these arrays with a my. Otherwise Perl will complain under use strict which you should always use.

Welcome to Perl!

Edit:

As was pointed out by Joel, your probably want to return references to these arrays. It's pretty easy to do, just use:

return (\@name, \@used, \@available, \@refer, \@mount);

Check it out perlref if you're confused about that.

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1  
Jozefg, you are completely correct, I did not see that earlier; moving the return did in fact fix my problem, now I just have to figure out how to add a new line between the returned variables! I omitted the use strict in the code I pasted, but I do have it in my script, and I also have declared most of the variables at the beginning of my script as well. Thank you for your help! –  Roncioiu Oct 22 '12 at 1:09
    
@user1763697 Anytime, if you found this answer helpful clicking the green check mark by this answer will mark this question as closed –  jozefg Oct 22 '12 at 1:11
    
I was wondering how to do that, thanks again. –  Roncioiu Oct 22 '12 at 1:15
    
Anytime! happy perling –  jozefg Oct 22 '12 at 1:15
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You are returning after one iteration. Place return outside the loop.

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Yup, that was the case. Thank you. –  Roncioiu Oct 22 '12 at 1:10
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Arrays can be really unwieldy and it looks a bit awkward from here. This is a more idiomatic version which returns a hashref of hashes keyed on the mount names (and assumes they are unique). I don't have zfs to test so this is untested but it should be right and the Dumper call should make it clear whats going on.

use strict;
use warnings;
use Data::Dumper;
$Data::Dumper::Terse = 1;

print Dumper( list() );

sub list {
    my %info;
    for ( qx { zfs list } )
    {
        my ( $name, $used, $available, $refer, $mount ) = split;
        $info{$name} = {
            used => $used,
            available => $available,
            refer => $refer,
            mount => $mount,
        };
    }
    \%info;
}

If you're still going to use the arrays, this syntax makes it a little less awkward for the return–

return \( @name, @used, @available, @refer, @mount );
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2  
Agreed here — splitting and then putting each entry into its own array is a really cumbersome thing to do here. Not only is it more work up front, it will also make more work to use the data. Roncioiu, I suggest you get familiar with the use of a hashref to store a "record" of related data together; it's a lot easier to manage than parallel arrays. –  hobbs Oct 23 '12 at 13:54
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