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For example record like this: property3->property2->property1 is understood for me, this means that property of class, is object of another class, for example:

class a {
        public $property1 = "some";
}


class b {
    function __construct () {
        $this->property2 = new a();
    }           
}

$obj = new b();
echo $obj->property2->property1;

this understood. but I can not understood records like this: method1()->method2()->method3()

can you post simple example, who using these records?

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1  
Those method finish by return $this;. –  Alain Tiemblo Oct 21 '12 at 20:56
2  
@Ninsuo: Not always. The methods return an object, not necessarily the same object which called them. –  Second Rikudo Oct 21 '12 at 20:58
    
Absolutely true. –  Alain Tiemblo Oct 21 '12 at 21:01

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

A simple example :

class A {

  function fooA() {
    echo "a...";
    return $this;
  }

  function fooB() {
    echo "b...";
    return $this;
  }

  function fooC() {
   echo "c...";
  }
}

$a = new A();
$a->fooA()->fooB()->fooC();

Or with several classes :

class A
{
  private $b;

  public function __construct()
  {
    $this->b = new B();
  }

  public function fooA()
  {
    echo "A...";
    return $this->b;
  }

}

class B
{

  public function fooB()
  {
    echo "B...";
  }

}

$a = new A();
$a->fooA()->fooB();
share|improve this answer
    
Again, you are giving an incomplete picture. It's not always that a method returns $this and it's magically chainable. –  Second Rikudo Oct 21 '12 at 21:02
2  
You're right, I completed my answer to meet your point. –  Alain Tiemblo Oct 21 '12 at 21:05

It means that these functions return objects. For example, the following is possible (assuming $pdo is a valid PDO object):

$result = $pdo->query("SELECT * FROM `table`")->fetchAll();

This may not always be favorable, because you:

  1. Lose readabiliy.
  2. Lose the ability to use the objects in between.
  3. Lose the ability to check for errors, and you are counting on the methods to return what you think it is.

    In this example, you only get the resultset in the form of an array, but you cannot access PDOStatement which is returned by PDO::query(). In this case, it may not matter, in some cases it might.

    Also, PDO::query() may return a BOOLEAN false in the case of an error, which would give an unexplained "Method fetchAll() used on an non-object" error.

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4  
Another potential problem is if query() fails to execute and returns an error boolean rather than an object... a strong argument for thrown exceptions –  Mark Baker Oct 21 '12 at 20:58
    
@MarkBaker: Well, if we're down to specifics, you should have enabled PDOExceptions :) –  Second Rikudo Oct 21 '12 at 21:00
1  
@MarkBaker Something going wrong in the method chain is indeed why I would never use it in the first place. And this is not only about pdo, but in general. +1 –  PeeHaa Oct 21 '12 at 21:01
1  
@Madara - just pointing out for the benefit of future readers that may not think about that possibility, or consider using a fluent interface in other code... but when used properly a fluent interface can be very powerful and easy –  Mark Baker Oct 21 '12 at 21:02
    
Good Example ..... :) + –  Baba Oct 21 '12 at 21:05

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