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I want to check that a method is not run and tried to do it with an Expectation setting times = 0;, however I don't get the expected behaviour.

For example, the following test passes, although the Session#stop method is called, and the expectation has a times = 0; condition:

public static class Session {
    public void stop() {}
}

public static class Whatever {
    Session s = new Session();
    public synchronized void method() {
        s.stop();
    }
}

@Test
public void testWhatever () throws Exception {
    new Expectations(Session.class) {
        @Mocked Session s;
        { s.stop(); times = 0; } //Session#stop must not be called
    };
    final Whatever w = new Whatever();
    w.method(); // this method calls Session#stop => the test should fail...
                // ... but it passes
}

Note: If I replace the code with { s.stop(); times = 1; }, the test passes too: I must be missing something obvious here...

share|improve this question
up vote 6 down vote accepted

The reason of the unexpected mocking behavior is that you inadvertently used partial mocking on an strictly mocked type. In this case, recording an expectation with times = <n> means that the first n matching invocations will be mocked, and after that any additional invocations will execute the original "unmocked" method. With regular mocking instead, you would get the expected behavior (ie, an UnexpectedInvocation getting thrown after n invocations).

The proper way to write the test is:

public static class Session { public void stop() {} }
public static class Whatever {
    Session s = new Session();
    public synchronized void method() { s.stop(); }
}

@Test
public void testWhatever ()
{
    new Expectations() {
        @Mocked Session s;
        { s.stop(); times = 0; }
    };

    final Whatever w = new Whatever();
    w.method();
}

Alternatively, it can also be written with a verification block instead, which is usually better for situations like these:

@Test
public void testWhatever (@Mocked final Session s)
{
    final Whatever w = new Whatever();
    w.method();

    new Verifications() {{ s.stop(); times = 0; }};
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot - that makes sense. – assylias Oct 23 '12 at 11:10
    
The first code block in your answer still does not works. Expectation of times = 0 or 1 both passed !!. Using StrictExpectations seems to solve this properly. – S.D. Dec 4 '15 at 5:51

Related to this I had trouble with JMockit, times = 0 and the @Tested annotation.

With the @Tested annotation you still have a 'real' class, so when registering an Expectation or a Verification (even with times = 0) on this real class, JMockit tries to execute the method. Solution is to partially mock the class in the Expectations:

@Tested
Session s;

new Expectations(Session.class) {{ 
   s.stop(); times = 0; } //Session#stop must not be called
};

This is the only way I found to use times=0 on methods from @Tested classes.

share|improve this answer

From memory, something like

verify( s  , times(0) ).stop();

will work. Trouble is, the Session in Whatever isn't your @Mock'ed one, but another object, so insert a

w.s = s;

just before w.method().

Cheers,

share|improve this answer
    
I'm not extremely familiar with jmockit, but I don't see any verify method and I believe mocking is based on type only, so w.s = s is not necessary. – assylias Oct 21 '12 at 21:33
2  
Sorry, that's a Mockito feature, I missed the jmockit tag - my bad. Still, I think my argument is valid, how should the mocked Session object have anything to do with the Whatever session object (at least that's how it would work with Mockito)? – Anders R. Bystrup Oct 21 '12 at 21:38
    
In jmockit, you mock a type, not an instance. So in my example, all Session instances should be mocked. Unless I misunderstood something of course ;-) Thanks anyway. – assylias Oct 21 '12 at 21:44
    
Then I learned something as well - good luck. – Anders R. Bystrup Oct 22 '12 at 7:56

I found a workaround with the MockUp class - the test below fails as expected - I would still like to understand why the original approach was not working.

@Test
public void testWhatever () throws Exception {
    new MockUp<Session>() {
        @Mock
        public void stop() {
            fail("stop should not have been called");
        }
    };
    final Whatever w = new Whatever();
    w.method();
}
share|improve this answer

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