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I've learned that OOP is all about data encapsulation, but what about passing data between classes that have nothing to do with each other (would the below example be worthy of using extends)?

class Dog {
    private $secretVar;

    public function getSecretVar() {
        $this->secretVar = 'psst... only for rainbow!';
        return $this->secretVar;
    }
}

class Rainbow {
    public function __construct(Dog $Dog) {
        print_r($Dog->getSecretVar());
    }
}

$Dog = new Dog();
$Rainbow = new Rainbow($Dog);

// ... classes that don't need the $secretVar

How would you encapsulate $secretVar for only classes Dog and Rainbow? As of now, anyone can call getSecretVar(), and I'm having a hard time allowing that to happen as it seems to defeat the whole point of encapsulation.

share|improve this question
    
How about a namespace? –  Bojan Kogoj Oct 21 '12 at 22:36
    
I will google that, I have never heard of it, I just started learning OOP –  user1631995 Oct 21 '12 at 22:37
    
By the way, the variable should be editable (not static) –  user1631995 Oct 21 '12 at 22:38
    
Uf, I'm afraid PHP doesn't have private classes. –  Bojan Kogoj Oct 21 '12 at 22:41

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Here's a solution, although, it's ugly.

class Dog {
    private $secretVar = 'psst... only for rainbow!';    

    public function getSecretVar($caller == NULL) {

        // Here's the trick...
        if (get_class($caller) == 'Rainbow') {
            return $this->secretVar;
        } else {
            return '';
        }
    }
}

class Rainbow {
    public function __construct(Dog $Dog) {
        print_r($Dog->getSecretVar($this));
    }
}

$Dog = new Dog();
$Rainbow = new Rainbow($Dog);

// ... classes that don't need the $secretVar

It's ugly because it hard to maintain and not intuitive. If you really need to do this, there's most likely a flaw in your design.

share|improve this answer
    
that's also a very smart answer. I think I don't really need to encapsulate this that far. Thank you for your time :D –  user1631995 Oct 21 '12 at 22:52
    
I'm accepting this answer, since it doesn't use up "extends." It's a little messy, but it does encapsulate the data. –  user1631995 Oct 21 '12 at 22:55

It wouldn't make sense for a Dog to extend Rainbow or vice versa just to share a variable.

What you are asking of may be possible but I don't know. If it was C++ using the friend visibility, it is certainly possible.

In this case, you have to make it public or use a getter and setter.

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thanks for the feedback –  user1631995 Oct 21 '12 at 22:44

Encapsulation is not ment to hide the value of the variable from the rest of the program but to have full control of how the rest of your program can access the variable.

By declaring the variable private you can check what values it can be set to and you can make changes to it before anybody reads it.

There is no real point in trying to let only some of the classes read the variable.

What you are trying to do could be achieved by using reflection to check which class and method calls the getSecretVar() method, but it's hardly ever useful.

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"There is no real point in trying to let only some of the classes read the variable." I guess that's the answer. I guess I was taking encapsulation too far. –  user1631995 Oct 21 '12 at 22:44

In your case, you could use protected like this: (every class that extends hasSecret will have access to it.)

<?php
class HasSecret {
    protected $secretVar = 'psst... only for rainbow!';
}

class Dog extends HasSecret {
    public function getSecretVar() {
        return $this->secretVar;
    }
}

class Rainbow extends HasSecret {
    public function __construct(Dog $Dog) {
        print_r($Dog->getSecretVar());
    }
}

$Dog = new Dog();
$Rainbow = new Rainbow($Dog);
share|improve this answer
    
I see, I failed to mention that the secret var is created in class Dog. I will edit my question. –  user1631995 Oct 21 '12 at 22:47
1  
@Adam184 In the Dog constructor, you can do: $this->secretVar = "something else"; –  pinouchon Oct 21 '12 at 22:49
    
:OOO that my friend is genius –  user1631995 Oct 21 '12 at 22:49
    
it would mean that I wouldn't be able to use extends again, but in my case it works –  user1631995 Oct 21 '12 at 22:50

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