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I am writing my own shell for a homework assignment, and am running into this issue:
Whenever I enter a command to redirect output to a file (i.e. ls -al > output.txt) my shell should handle the command and redirect the output. However, I keep getting this message displayed:
ls: write error: Bad file descriptor
I saw on a few other forums that it might be in reference to exceeding the amount of memory, but I don't see how that could be the issue. Here's a bit of my code (if you need more for clarity, feel free to ask):

        loc[0] = argv[0];                 //used for execution

        while(argv[count] != 0){                    //loop through commands
                if(strcmp(argv[count], "<") == 0)    //and test for certain flags
                        inFlag = 1;
                else if(strcmp(argv[count], ">") == 0){
                        argv[count] = argv[count+1] = 0;
                        outFlag = 1;
                }
                else if(strcmp(argv[count], "&") == 0)
                        bgFlag == 1;
                else if(strcmp(argv[count], "|") == 0){
                        argv[count] = 0;
                        loc[pipes+1] = argv[count+1];
                        pipes++;
                }

                count++;
        }

        for(k = 0; k <= pipes; k++){
                if(j < pipes){
                        pipe(r_tube);
                        j++;
        }

                pid = fork();

                if(pid > 0){
                        if(j > 0){
                                close(l_tube[0]);
                                close(l_tube[1]);
                        }
                        l_tube[0] = r_tube[0];
                        l_tube[1] = r_tube[1];
                }
                else if(pid == 0){
                        if((k == 0) && (inFlag == 1)){
                                int n = open("input.txt", "r");
                                close (0);
                                dup (n);
                                close (n);
                        }
                        else if((k > 0) && (k < pipes)){

                        }
                        else if((k == pipes) && (outFlag == 1)){   //<-----issue
                                int out = open("output.txt", 0666);
                                close (1);
                                dup (out);
                                close (out);
                        }
                        else if(k == pipes){

                        }
                        execvp(argv[loc[k]], &argv[loc[k]]);
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Try this:

count = 0;

loc[0] = argv[0];                 //used for execution

count++;
pipes++;

char* outFile = NULL;
char* inFile = NULL;

while(argv[count] != 0)
{ 
    if(strcmp(argv[count], "<") == 0)
    { 
        inFile = strdup(argv[count+1]);
        inFlag = 1;
        count++;
    }
    else if(strcmp(argv[count], ">") == 0)
    {
        outFile = strdup(argv[count+1]);
        outFlag = 1;
        count++;
    }
    else if(strcmp(argv[count], "&") == 0)
    {
        bgFlag == 1;
    }
    else if(strcmp(argv[count], "|") == 0)
    {
        argv[count] = 0;
        loc[pipes] = argv[count+1];
        pipes++;
    }

    count++;
}

int current_out = STDOUT_FILENO;
int current_in = STDIN_FILENO;
int next_in = STDIN_FILENO;

for(k = 0; k <= pipes; k++)
{
    int cur_pipes[2];

    int last_out = current_out;
    int last_in = current_in;

    if(k < pipes)
    {
        pipe(cur_pipes);
        current_out = cur_pipes[1];
        current_in = next_in;
        next_in = cur_pipes[0];
    }

    else if (k == pipes)
    {
        current_out = STDOUT_FILENO;
        current_in = next_in;
    }

    pid = fork();

    if(pid > 0)
    {
        if(k > 0)
        {
            close(last_out);
            close(last_in);
        }
    }
    else if(pid == 0)
    {
        if((k == 0) && (inFlag == 1))
        {
            int n = open(inFile, O_RDONLY);
            if (n == -1) 
            {
                printf("Could not open input file!\n");
                exit(1);
            }
            current_in = n;
        }

        if((k == pipes) && (outFlag == 1))
        {
            int n = open(outFile, O_WRONLY | O_CREAT, 0666);
            if (n == -1) {
                printf("Could not open output file!\n");
                exit(1);
            }

            current_out = n;
        }       

        if (current_in != STDIN_FILENO)
        {
            close (STDIN_FILENO);
            dup (current_in);
            close (current_in);
        }

        if(current_out != STDOUT_FILENO)
        {
            close(STDOUT_FILENO);
            dup(current_out);
            close(current_out);
        }

        execvp(argv[loc[k]], &argv[loc[k]]);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
So, it turns out that I actually can't open the file (it returns the printf statement). Is there a way to fix this? Could it be in my permissions (0666)? –  Baelix Oct 22 '12 at 1:04
    
In my directory, the file "output.txt" is already present (in the same directory as this shell program). How would I set the pwd write permissions? –  Baelix Oct 22 '12 at 1:08
    
The changes solved that issue, but are now causing another. If you notice in my code, after seeing that ">" is present, I set both the ">" and the output file name to NULL. I was receiving this error, which I am now receiving again: ls: cannot access >: No such file or directory –  Baelix Oct 22 '12 at 1:27
    
The compiler is not accepting "O_RDONLY", "O_WRONLY", "O_CREAT". It's treating them as variables, and calling them undefined. So I have no way to check this. Is there a specific library I need to #include in order for these to become keywords? –  Baelix Oct 22 '12 at 1:39
    
I was missing one #include :P But after getting the commands to work, it is still bring up that same error: "ls: cannot access >: No such file or directory" –  Baelix Oct 22 '12 at 1:45

int open(const char pathname, int flags, ... / mode_t mode */);

You need an access mode in order to determine what you are going to do with the file. For example (O_WRONLY - write only or O_RDONLY - read only)...btw there are alot more than these 2.

share|improve this answer
    
I pointed this out to him already. He was using the standard C open flags, rather than the POSIX open flags. There were issues beyond just this though. –  Geoff Montee Oct 22 '12 at 10:10

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