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I've been working on Java homework. Here are my instructions:

Interface Programming Assignment

Create an interface named ISum. The interface should define 2 methods. The first method should take two integers as arguments and return their sum. The second method should take 2 strings as arguments and return their concatenation. The second method should be an overloaded version of the first one.

Define another interface named IAverage. The interface should define one method that takes 2 integer arguments and returns the average.

Create a class named Calculator that implements both the interfaces defined above. Your class MUST implement exception handling. Create a driver class that allows a user to call each of the methods in your class.

My work so far:

Main class:

import java.util.Scanner;

public class Main {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Calculator calculatorObject = new Calculator();
        Scanner scannerObject = new Scanner(System.in);

        System.out.println("Enter 1 for integer or 2 for string");
        int test1 = scannerObject.nextInt();

        switch (test1){
            case 1: 
                System.out.println("Enter 1st number");
                int int1 = scannerObject.nextInt();

                System.out.println("Enter 2nd number");
                int int2 = scannerObject.nextInt();   

                System.out.println("Enter 1 for sum or 2 for average");
                int test2 = scannerObject.nextInt(); 

                switch (test2){
                    case 1: 
                        int sum = calculatorObject.intSum(int1,int2);
                        System.out.println("The sum is " + sum);
                        break;

                    case 2:
                        int avg = calculatorObject.intAvg(int1,int2);
                        System.out.println("The avg is " + avg);
                        break;

                    default:
                        System.out.println("You entered an invalid option");    
                        break;    
                }

                break; 

            case 2: 
                System.out.println("Enter 1st string");
                String string1 = scannerObject.nextLine();

                System.out.println("Enter 2nd number");
                String string2 = scannerObject.nextLine();   

                String stringConcat = calculatorObject.stringSum(string1,string2);
                System.out.println("The sum is " + stringConcat);
                break; 

            default:
                System.out.println("You entered an invalid option");    
                break;
        }
    }
} 

ISum interface:

public interface ISum {

    public void intSum();
    public void intAvg();

}

IAverage interface:

public interface IAverage {

    public void intAvg();

}

Calculate class:

abstract class Calculator implements IAverage, ISum { 

    public int intSum (int1,int2){
        int int1;
        int int2;
        int sum = int1 + int2;
        return sum;
    }

    public String stringSum (string1,string2){
        String string1;
        String string2;
        String stringConcat = string1.concat(string2);
        return stringConcat;
    }

    public int intAvg(int1,int2){
        int int1;
        int int2;
        int avg = (int1 + int2)/2;
        return avg;
    }

}
share|improve this question
3  
Can you tell us what is your problem with your code? –  Russell Gutierrez Oct 22 '12 at 2:01
    
Make sure you go back and read up on what "overloaded" means –  Matt Whipple Oct 22 '12 at 2:02
    
And to nitpick even though you're missing big pieces...methods are not passed parameters, they are passed arguments. –  Matt Whipple Oct 22 '12 at 2:04
1  
In the future, please copypaste the exact compilation errors or exception stacktraces you got instead of ignoring them as if they're decoration. They are namely the whole answer at its own. We just have to translate them for you in layman's terms. –  BalusC Oct 22 '12 at 2:11

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

you redeclare and reinitialize your parameter variables before using them, so they are blank by the time you touch them.

For instance:

public int intSum (int1,int2){

    int int1;
    int int2;

    int sum = int1 + int2;

    return sum;


}

In the first line, public int intSum (int1,int2){, thats you declaring int1 and int2 as method-local variables. You do not need to then do int int1; or int int2;. By including these lines you overwrite them with nothing. For the above method, you just need:

public int intSum (int1,int2){

    int sum = int1 + int2;

    return sum;


}

Edit: derp, reading fail. you should also give the parameters a type, so

public int intSum (int int1, int int2){

    int sum = int1 + int2;

    return sum;


}
share|improve this answer
1  
Thank you very much! –  Rocky Celltick Eadie Oct 24 '12 at 2:39

At first glance, it seems your methods can't see the parameters because the methods in ISum have no parameters.

Try this and you should be on your way:

public interface ISum {

    public int intSum(int first, int second);
    public int intAvg(String first, String second);

}
share|improve this answer
1  
well, also he needs to have an int return type, not void –  rees Oct 22 '12 at 2:05
1  
Changed. Thanks. –  gobernador Oct 22 '12 at 2:06
    
Thank you very much! –  Rocky Celltick Eadie Oct 24 '12 at 2:39

Your instructions state creating 2 methods that are overloaded.

public interface ISum {

public void sum(int a,int b);
public void sum(String s1,String s2);

}

The method names must be the same.
The return type can be changed to int and String.

share|improve this answer
    
If answering questions here, please adhere to Java naming standards. Let's not pass on bad habits. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Oct 22 '12 at 2:06
1  
shouldn't there be variable names on those parameters? –  Russell Gutierrez Oct 22 '12 at 2:08
    
Can you explain whats wrong with the naming standards? –  AbhishekGirish Oct 22 '12 at 2:11
    
my bad! Corrected. I had overlooked it, after a last minute change. –  AbhishekGirish Oct 22 '12 at 2:13
    
To save others googling for this as I did, javacodegeeks.com/2011/08/java-naming-conventions.html advises that method names in Java should be in lowerCamelCase. As this is a one word method this means it should be all lower case. –  Chris O'Kelly Oct 22 '12 at 2:20

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