Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Assuming this program is running in background.

Assuming headers are included e.g signal.h...

void SignalHandler(int sig);
int fd;
int main(int argc, char *argv[]){


signal(SIGINT,SignalHandler);
signal(SIGHUP,SignalHandler);
signal(SIGTERM,SignalHandler);

setsid();
close(0);
close(1);
close(2);


fd = open("/myPIPE", O_RDWR);
if(fd<0){
perror("open() error");
exit(1);
}

while (1) {
        err = read(fd, strbuf, 256);
        if(err)
            syslog(LOG_INFO,"%s",strbuf);   

        }
close(fd);

}

void SignalHandler(int sig){

if(fd!=-1)
close(fd);
exit(0);

}

Assuming that this code is already running. and has program name of testsignal. When i run it again in the terminal ./testsignal & the process just keeps on adding up.. the currently running process should exit and the new process should replace the old one. so only process should be running. I need help on this. Thanks

share|improve this question
    
Please post your actual code. there is no fd in scope of signalhandler. –  Myforwik Oct 22 '12 at 2:31
    
My bad there you go.. the fd variable is global.. –  demic0de Oct 22 '12 at 2:36
1  
you need to store old pid somewhere, or find pid in procfs –  eicto Oct 22 '12 at 2:41
    
will openlog("testpipe", LOG_PID) do? –  demic0de Oct 22 '12 at 2:46
    
How will the new process know which is the PID of the old process? You could pass it as an argument to the program (no argument, no old process to kill). You could store it in a well known location. (It's slightly worrying that you can create /myPIPE; you should not normally create files in the root directory of the system.) Your signal handler isn't really necessary; the system will close the open file descriptor anyway — but I recognize that it's there for pedagogical reasons. –  Jonathan Leffler Oct 22 '12 at 2:47

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

This code is a simplification of yours in that it doesn't use syslog(). It also doesn't close standard input, standard output and standard error, so the daemon still has a way to log information to standard output (specifically). This makes it easier for me to test.

The flprintf() function is used to ensure that all outputs to standard output are flushed; it reduces the number of boring 4-line blocks of code in the program. The program also logs more of its activity, which also makes it easier to see what's going on. (In part that's because I managed to overlook the commented-out close() system calls.) I make everything that doesn't have to be visible outside of this source file static; that means only main() is not static. This code also ensures that the string read is null terminated, so long strings followed by short ones don't produce messages that are a mish-mash of the short one plus the remains of the longer ones.

#include <unistd.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <signal.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <fcntl.h>
#include <stdarg.h>

static void flprintf(const char *fmt, ...);
static void SignalHandler(int sig);
static int fd = -1;

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    int nbytes;
    char strbuf[257];

    if (argc > 1)
    {
        int pid = atoi(argv[1]);
        if (kill(pid, SIGINT) != 0)
            flprintf("Failed to deliver SIGINT to PID %d\n", pid);
        else
            flprintf("SIGINT successfully delivered to PID %d\n", pid);
    }

    flprintf("Starting - %d\n", (int)getpid());

    signal(SIGINT, SignalHandler);
    signal(SIGHUP, SignalHandler);
    signal(SIGTERM, SignalHandler);

    setsid();
    //close(0);
    //close(1);
    //close(2);

    fd = open("./myPIPE", O_RDWR);
    if (fd < 0)
    {
        perror("open() error");
        exit(1);
    }

    flprintf("Starting read loop\n");

    while ((nbytes = read(fd, strbuf, sizeof(strbuf)-1)) > 0)
    {
        strbuf[nbytes] = '\0';
        flprintf("<<%s>>\n", strbuf);
    }

    flprintf("Read EOF - %d exiting\n", (int)getpid());

    close(fd);
    return(0);
}

void SignalHandler(int sig)
{
    flprintf("Received signal %d - %d exiting\n", sig, (int)getpid());
    if (fd != -1)
        close(fd);
    exit(0);
}

static void flprintf(const char *fmt, ...)
{
    va_list args;
    va_start(args, fmt);
    vprintf(fmt, args);
    va_end(args);
    fflush(stdout);
}

I tested on Mac OS X 10.7.5 (GCC 4.7.1, not that it matters much in this case). The only behaviour I found surprising once it was working was that the program didn't get EOF when the process writing a message to the FIFO closed. However, I think that's explained by the O_RDWR on the open() call; there's still a process (this one) with the FIFO open. Recompile with O_RDONLY and the process exits after the first time something writes to the pipe...sanity rules. What you've done is fine as a way of achieving a FIFO that never reports EOF. (It also explains why the process didn't block on the open, waiting for a process to open the FIFO.)

Sample output:

$ ./sig >> sig.out &
[1] 47598
$ cat sig.out
Starting - 47598
Starting read loop
$ echo "Testing, 1, 2, 3" > myPIPE
$ cat sig.out
Starting - 47598
Starting read loop
<<Testing, 1, 2, 3
>>
$ echo "Another test - 1, 2, 3" > myPIPE
$ echo "Mini test - 1, 2" > myPIPE
$ cat sig.out
Starting - 47598
Starting read loop
<<Testing, 1, 2, 3
>>
<<Another test - 1, 2, 3
>>
<<Mini test - 1, 2
>>
$ ./sig 47598 >> sig.out &
[2] 47610
$ cat sig.out
Starting - 47598
Starting read loop
<<Testing, 1, 2, 3
>>
<<Another test - 1, 2, 3
>>
<<Mini test - 1, 2
>>
Received signal 2 - 47598 exiting
SIGINT successfully delivered to PID 47598
Starting - 47610
Starting read loop
[1]-  Done                    ./sig >> sig.out
$ echo "Testing, 1, 2, 3" > myPIPE
$ cat sig.out
Starting - 47598
Starting read loop
<<Testing, 1, 2, 3
>>
<<Another test - 1, 2, 3
>>
<<Mini test - 1, 2
>>
Received signal 2 - 47598 exiting
SIGINT successfully delivered to PID 47598
Starting - 47610
Starting read loop
<<Testing, 1, 2, 3
>>
$ kill 47610
$ cat sig.out
Starting - 47598
Starting read loop
<<Testing, 1, 2, 3
>>
<<Another test - 1, 2, 3
>>
<<Mini test - 1, 2
>>
Received signal 2 - 47598 exiting
SIGINT successfully delivered to PID 47598
Starting - 47610
Starting read loop
<<Testing, 1, 2, 3
>>
Received signal 15 - 47610 exiting
[2]+  Done                    ./sig 47598 >> sig.out
$ 
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks... Great answer very detailed.. I'll just like to make changes so when it stores the pid to a pidfile so i don't type in as an argument. Can i put the pid in a file like pidfile e.g /tmp/sig.pid so when the program starts it first checks the file and kill it then start it again so it don't create a second instance of the program. thanks a lot for helping. –  demic0de Oct 22 '12 at 6:22
1  
Yes, you can do it that way. Some things to watch for are (1) whether you'll run into conflicts with your fixed name, or (2) whether someone could remove your pid file and then create a new one that points to a system process that they want killed. This sort of thing would be a problem if your program is run by root. But it probably doesn't matter for a coursework exercise. –  Jonathan Leffler Oct 22 '12 at 6:28
    
hmmm so creating a pidfile is not advisable.. Thank you so much you've been a great help. I have another question.. is setsid() without forking good? –  demic0de Oct 22 '12 at 6:42
    
The signal handler calls non-async-signal-safe functions. vprintf, for example, might interrupt itself during memory allocation under the hood. Messy. –  pilcrow Oct 22 '12 at 14:16
    
@pilcrow: Yeah — strictly you're correct. This is demonstration code; I chose not to inundate the OP with those details. His original code was much nearer to clean from that viewpoint. –  Jonathan Leffler Oct 22 '12 at 14:17

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.