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I have a text file with several fields in the following format. Name:Phone:Address:Date of birth:Salary The date of birth is in the format mm/dd/yy. I am having no idea on how to calculate age of the specific person by subtracting their birth year from current year. I need to extract the age then compare it with certain age group lets say 50. I tried some stuff but it gave me weird numbers like awk -F: '{print $4-d}' "d=$(date)" filename

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You will need to include details about how the comparison of age groups should proceed. Exactly how do you define an age group? Also, consider adding some sample data and expected output. –  Steve Oct 22 '12 at 3:20
    
I need to list the people who are less than 60 years old –  croxfade Oct 22 '12 at 3:44
    
I've updated by answer. Please let me know if it has answered your question. Cheers. –  Steve Oct 22 '12 at 3:49

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You may like to try:

awk -F: -v year=$(date +"%Y") '{ split($4, dob, "/"); print $1, "is", year-dob[3], "years old" }' file.txt

EDIT 1:

To simply print a list of the people who are less than 60 years old, try:

awk -F: -v year=$(date +"%Y") '{ split($4, dob, "/"); if (year-dob[3] <= 60) print $1 }' file.txt

Explanation:

I'm assuming a basic understanding of awk. The -v option allows awk to read in a variable from the shell. In this case, date +"Y" simply returns the current year. awk has a split function that allows you to split a field. In this case, the fourth field containing our date has / separating the months/days/years. split splits things into arrays. In this case, I've named the array dob (date of birth). The third field (1 indexed) contains the year of birth. Then some quick maths in a conditional to check that the age of the person is 60+. If he is print out his name in the first field.

Edit 2:

After thinking about your question a little more, it's obvious that the above approach does not actually calculate things perfectly. It was a rough quick job (I'm sorry, well ...). So here's an updated version that will be much, much more accurate. Run like:

awk -f script.awk file.txt

Contents of script.awk:

BEGIN {
    FS=":"
    "date +\"%s\"" | getline cdate
}

{
    rdate = gensub(/([0-9]+)\/([0-9]+)\/([0-9]+)/, "\\3-\\1-\\2", "g", $4)
    cmd = "date -d " rdate " +\"%s\""

    while (( cmd | getline result ) > 0 ) {

        if ((cdate - result) / 31556926 <= 60) {
            print $1
        }
    }
}

Edit 3:

Or without external commands and getline:

BEGIN {
    FS=":"
    cdate = systime()
}

{
    rdate = gensub(/([0-9]+)\/([0-9]+)\/([0-9]+)/, "\\3 \\1 \\2 0 0 0", "g", $4)
    result = mktime(rdate)

    if ((cdate - result) / 31556926 <= 60) {
       print $1
    }
}
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ty steve this worked for me but i did dob[3] instead of year-dob[3] as it was giving me the year of their birth like 1949 or 1963 like that. Also it would be really helpful if you could explain some of the stuffs in the command (this is just for my understanding so I could handle stuffs like this in future) as I am new to shell scripting. For instance what is the -v for and what does (date + "%Y") do and what the split functionality is for. And once again thank you very very much. –  croxfade Oct 22 '12 at 3:52
    
No problem. I'll update my answer in a couple of minutes. –  Steve Oct 22 '12 at 3:54
    
@AvishKansakar: I've updated my answer; would you like an explanation on the second method? If so, I'll have to do this a bit later on. HTH. –  Steve Oct 22 '12 at 5:09
    
You'd need to add a guess at the century to the above since the input year format is yy instead of yyyy. Also, since you're assuming gnu awk by gensub(), there's no need to call shell's "date" and use getline to read it's result since time functions are already built into GNU awk. I'll update my answer to demonstrate the same approach as above but without shell calls and getline. –  Ed Morton Oct 22 '12 at 15:02
    
Thanks @EdMorton, some good catches there. Hopefully this will work on the OP's input! Cheers. –  Steve Oct 23 '12 at 0:47

With GNU awk (should work but untested since you didn't provide any sample input and expected output):

BEGIN{
   FS = ":"
   nowSecs  = systime()
   nowYear  = strftime("%Y",nowSecs)
   nowDay   = strftime("%j",nowSecs)
}

{
   # input date format is MM/DD/YY
   dobSpec = gensub(/([0-9]+)\/([0-9]+)\/([0-9]+)/, "\\3 \\1 \\2 0 0 0", "", $4)
   dobSecs = mktime("20" dobSpec)

   if ( (dobSecs > nowSecs) || (dobSecs < 0) ) {
      # guessed the wrong century so try again
      dobSecs = mktime("19" dobSpec)
   }

   dobYear = strftime("%Y",dobSecs)
   dobDay  = strftime("%j",dobSecs)

   diffYears = nowYear - dobYear
   diffDays  = nowDay  - dobDay

   age = diffYears + (diffDays >= 0 ? 1 : 0)

   if ( age < 60 ) {
      print
   }

}

As an alternative, here's what @steve's solution would look like without using the external call to shell's date and subsequent getline:

BEGIN {
    FS=":"
    cdate = systime()
}

{
    rdate = gensub(/([0-9]+)\/([0-9]+)\/([0-9]+)/, "\\3 \\1 \\2 0 0 0", "g", $4)
    result = mktime(rdate)

    if ((cdate - result) / 31556926 <= 60) {
       print $1
    }
}

I didn't go that route as I didn't want to use the seconds-per-year approximation since I think there are edge cases where that wouldn't work. Like @steve's original, the second solution above will need to be modified to provide the missing century in the input year just like I did in my first solution above.

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