Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The example code is like this, it does the statistic of number of times the first column appears and sort the result.

    { dist[$1]+=1; }
END { for (i in dist) {
        print i,dist[i] | "sort"
      }
    }

In my opinion, the process is like this:

(WORKFLOW A)

1) print all element in the dist, save them all to a buffer

2) get all elements in the buffer, and pipe them to sort function

But in the example above, the process looks like this:

(WORKFLOW B)

1) print one element in the dist, and then pipe it to sort function

2) process the next element in the dist, until no new element in dist

I was wondering why I shouldn't place the sort like this:

    { dist[$1]+=1; }
END { for (i in dist) {
        print i,dist[i] 
      } 
      | "sort"
    }

Anyone has any idea about the reason? And how can I write the pipe if I want to do the work like WORKFLOW B?

Thanks!

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The reason you can't do it the second way is because | "command" is part of the syntax of awk's print command, it can't be used with arbitrary statements or statement groups. The same thing goes for > filename.

The way it works is that the first time it encounters a redirection to a file or pipe, it opens that file/pipe, and keeps that descriptor open. Then every time you redirect to the same file/pipe, it sends the output to the corresponding descriptor.

share|improve this answer

See @barmar's answer for "why not", and here's how to get that functionality (invoke sort at the end of the loop) to address the second part of your question:

    { dist[$1]+=1; }
END { for (i in dist) {
        out = out i OFS dist[i] ORS 
      } 
      printf "%s",out | "sort"
    }
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.