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I have a text file with the following type of data in it below:

Example:
10212012115655_113L_-247R_247LRdiff_0;
10212012115657_114L_-246R_246LRdiff_0;
10212012115659_115L_-245R_245LRdiff_0;
10212012113951_319L_-41R_41LRdiff_2;
10212012115701_116L_-244R_244LRdiff_0;
10212012115703_117L_-243R_243LRdiff_0;
10212012115705_118L_-242R_242LRdiff_0;
10212012113947_317L_-43R_43LRdiff_0;
10212012114707_178L_-182R_182LRdiff_3;
10212012115027_278L_-82R_82LRdiff_1;

I would like to copy all the data lines that have

1) _2 _3 _1 at the end of it into another file along with
2) stripping out the semicolon at the end of it.

So at the end the data in the file will be

Example:  
10212012113951_319L_-41R_41LRdiff_2
10212012114707_178L_-182R_182LRdiff_3
10212012115027_278L_-82R_82LRdiff_1

How can I go about doing this? I'm using linux ubuntu 10.04 64bit

Thanks

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here's one way using sed:

sed -n 's/\(.*_[123]\);$/\1/p' file.txt > newfile.txt

Here's one way using grep:

grep -oP '.*_(1|2|3)(?=;$)' file.txt > newfile.txt

Contents of newfile.txt:

10212012113951_319L_-41R_41LRdiff_2
10212012114707_178L_-182R_182LRdiff_3
10212012115027_278L_-82R_82LRdiff_1
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Nice, didn't even think to use sed by itself, though I used sed's regex to pull the semi-colon =P. +1! –  newfurniturey Oct 22 '12 at 3:13
    
Thanks! I've updated my answer, you can even use grep all by itself too. –  Steve Oct 22 '12 at 3:15

If the format is always the same and there is only a semi-colon at the very end of each line you can use grep to find the lines and then sed to replace the ;:

grep -P "_(1|2|3);$" your_file | sed 's/\(.*\);$/\1/' > your_new_file

The -P in the grep command tells it to use the Perl-regex interpreter for parsing. Alternatively, you could use egrep (if available).

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here is the awk solution if at all you are interested:

awk '/_[321];$/{gsub(/;/,"");print}' your_file

tested below:

> awk '/_[321];$/{gsub(/;/,"");print}' temp
10212012113951_319L_-41R_41LRdiff_2
10212012114707_178L_-182R_182LRdiff_3
10212012115027_278L_-82R_82LRdiff_1
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That will work given the OPs sample data but to nit-pick - since you only want to remove one ; you should be using sub() rather than gsub() and since you only want to to remove a semi-colon at the end of the line you should include that in the RE and use sub(/;$/,""). –  Ed Morton Oct 22 '12 at 12:31
tr -c ";" "\n" > newfile
grep '*_[123]$' newfile > newfile

This should work. At first you translate all ; to \n and save result to destination file. Then use grep to match the lines only containing *_[123] at the end and save matching result to that file again that will replace all previous data. To mark at the end I used $.

Some examples using tr and grep in case you are not familiar to it.

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