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Parse CIL code with Regex

This question comes from Parse CIL code with Regex To capture methods' body I added brackets (), it becomes

var regex3 = @"(\.method\s[^{]+({(?!\s*}).*?}))";

and it worked fine. For example, capture.Groups[2] gives me

{
    .entrypoint
    // 
    .maxstack  8
    IL_0000:  nop
    IL_0001:  call       void TestAssemblyConsole.Test::Method1()
    IL_0006:  nop
    IL_0007:  call       int32 TestAssemblyConsole.Test::Method2()
    IL_000c:  pop
    IL_000d:  call       string [mscorlib]System.Console::ReadLine()
    IL_0012:  pop
    IL_0013:  ret
  }

and it's what I'm looking for. However if I have

.method public hidebysig static void  Method1() cil managed
  {
    // 
    .maxstack 3
    .locals init (class [mscorlib]System.Exception V_0)
    IL_0000:  nop
    .try
    {
      .try
      {
        IL_0001:  nop
        IL_0002:  ldstr      "gfhgfhgfhg"
        IL_0007:  call       void [mscorlib]System.Console::WriteLine(string)
        IL_000c:  nop
        IL_000d:  nop
        IL_000e:  leave.s    IL_0020

      }  // end .try
      catch [mscorlib]System.Exception 
      {
        IL_0010:  stloc.0
        IL_0011:  nop
        IL_0012:  ldstr      "exception"
        IL_0017:  call       void [mscorlib]System.Console::WriteLine(string)
        IL_001c:  nop
        IL_001d:  nop
        IL_001e:  leave.s    IL_0020

      }  // end handler
      IL_0020:  nop
      IL_0021:  leave.s    IL_0031

    }  // end .try
    finally
    {
      IL_0023:  nop
      IL_0024:  ldstr      "finally"
      IL_002f:  nop
      IL_0030:  endfinally
    }  // end handler
    IL_0031:  nop
    IL_0032:  ret
  } 

then it does not working well. I just captures the part of method's body because of } .. } within a method

{
    // 
    .maxstack  1
    .locals init (class [mscorlib]System.Exception V_0)
    IL_0000:  nop
    .try
    {
      .try
      {
        IL_0001:  nop
        IL_0002:  ldstr      "gfhgfhgfhg"
        IL_0007:  call       void [mscorlib]System.Console::WriteLine(string)
        IL_000c:  nop
        IL_000d:  nop
        IL_000e:  leave.s    IL_0020

      }

How do I change regex to be able to capture all method's body even when it contains many { .. } ?

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marked as duplicate by Ken Bloom, svick, JE SUIS CHARLIE, Ramesh, Jon Oct 23 '12 at 7:56

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3 Answers 3

Basically Regexes are not the right tool for matching nested structures, however in your case you could use something like {.*} to match everything until the last } (Obviously that won't work with multiple methods.)

Write a CF Grammar parser yourself or use something like Antlr.

share|improve this answer
    
Also you may want to take a look at this. –  fardjad Oct 22 '12 at 3:40
1  
use something like {.*} Please explain how should I exactly use it? –  Marius Kavansky Oct 22 '12 at 3:56
    
@AlanDert: Assuming only a single method in the file/string, the pattern matches the first brace at the beginning of the function and the last brace just before the end of the file/string because regexes are greedy by default. Won't work if you have more than one method declared in the file/string. –  slebetman Oct 22 '12 at 4:11
    
Each .method in CIL always (at least -- in my case) ends either with IL_xxxx: ret or IL_xxxx: throw. Hope it helps. However a .method can contain several throw (but if there is no ret then last throw is the end of .method) –  Marius Kavansky Oct 22 '12 at 4:34

This isn't something you can accomplish with a regex. To handle nested structures like this, you need to use a context free grammar parser.

In your case, you can probably get away with a simple scanner that counts the number of times you saw a { and the number of times you saw a } and then extract a method body whenever those counts are equal. But I'm if you're going to find other delimiters you need to worry about (or you're going to have to deal with comments), then this is going to get complicated fast, and a parser generator will be what you want.

share|improve this answer

Using regex for parsing structure code is not recommended and it is bad practice

If your input is structured as shown in your question, try to use regex pattern

(\.method\s[^{]+?([\n\r]+\s*){(?!\s*}).*?\2})

Test it here.

share|improve this answer
    
What do you mean by structure code? –  Marius Kavansky Oct 22 '12 at 14:19
    
@AlanDert - That you have always same leading spacing before method's beginning { and matching closing } –  Ωmega Oct 22 '12 at 14:22
    
@AlanDert - Click to test link in my answer and see my notes // in input text –  Ωmega Oct 22 '12 at 15:44

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