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I'm writing a program in OpenCL that receives two arrays of points, and calculates the nearest neighbour for each point.

I have two programs for this. One of them will calculate distance for 4 dimensions, and one for 6 dimensions. They are below:

4 dimensions:

kernel void BruteForce(
    global  read_only float4* m,
    global  float4* y,
    global write_only ushort* i,
    read_only uint mx)
{
    int index = get_global_id(0);
    float4 curY = y[index];

    float minDist = MAXFLOAT;
    ushort minIdx = -1;
    int x = 0;
    int mmx = mx;
    for(x = 0; x < mmx; x++)
    {
        float dist = fast_distance(curY, m[x]);
        if (dist < minDist)
        {
            minDist = dist;
            minIdx = x;
        }
    }
    i[index] = minIdx;
    y[index] = minDist;
}

6 dimensions:

kernel void BruteForce(
    global  read_only float8* m,
    global  float8* y,
    global write_only ushort* i,
    read_only uint mx)
{
    int index = get_global_id(0);
    float8 curY = y[index];

    float minDist = MAXFLOAT;
    ushort minIdx = -1;
    int x = 0;
    int mmx = mx;
    for(x = 0; x < mmx; x++)
    {
        float8 mx = m[x];
        float d0 = mx.s0 - curY.s0;
        float d1 = mx.s1 - curY.s1;
        float d2 = mx.s2 - curY.s2;
        float d3 = mx.s3 - curY.s3;
        float d4 = mx.s4 - curY.s4;
        float d5 = mx.s5 - curY.s5;

        float dist = sqrt(d0 * d0 + d1 * d1 + d2 * d2 + d3 * d3 + d4 * d4 + d5 * d5);
        if (dist < minDist)
        {
            minDist = dist;
            minIdx = index;
        }
    }
    i[index] = minIdx;
    y[index] = minDist;
}

I'm looking for ways to optimize this program for GPGPU. I've read some articles (including http://www.macresearch.org/opencl_episode6, which comes with a source code) about GPGPU optimization by using local memory. I've tried applying it and came up with this code:

kernel void BruteForce(
    global  read_only float4* m,
    global  float4* y,
    global write_only ushort* i,
    __local float4 * shared)
{
    int index = get_global_id(0);
    int lsize = get_local_size(0);
    int lid = get_local_id(0);

    float4 curY = y[index];

    float minDist = MAXFLOAT;
    ushort minIdx = 64000;
    int x = 0;
    for(x = 0; x < {0}; x += lsize)
    {
        if((x+lsize) > {0}) 
            lsize = {0} - x;
        if ( (x + lid) < {0})
        {
            shared[lid] = m[x + lid];
        }
        barrier(CLK_LOCAL_MEM_FENCE);

        for (int x1 = 0; x1 < lsize; x1++)
        {
            float dist = distance(curY, shared[x1]);

            if (dist < minDist)
            {
                minDist = dist;
                minIdx = x + x1;
            }
        }
        barrier(CLK_LOCAL_MEM_FENCE);
    }
    i[index] = minIdx;
    y[index] = minDist;
}

I'm getting garbage results for my 'i' output (e.g. many values that are the same). Can anyone point me to the right direction? I'll appreciate any answer that helps me improve this code, or maybe find the problem with the optimize version above.

Thank you very much Cauê

share|improve this question
    
how large are your arrays typically? for the 6d version, do you mind if the last two elements are used or dropped entirely? –  mfa Oct 22 '12 at 10:40
    
thanks for your answer! My arrays are pretty large (~400000 points on each). I don't mind dropping the last two elements entirely. I just added them because in my tests, a non-aligned version (with float * instead of float8 *) was throwing "out of resources" errors –  Waneck Oct 22 '12 at 17:38
    
also for the 4D, I'm actually using only 3 dimensions, so this could be applied to this version as well. –  Waneck Oct 22 '12 at 17:40

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

One way to get a big speed up here is to use local data structures and compute entire blocks of data at a time. You should also only need a single read/write global vector (float4). The same idea can be applied to the 6d version using smaller blocks. Each work group is able to work freely through the block of data it is crunching. I will leave the exact implementation to you because you will know the specifics of your application.

some pseudo-ish-code (4d):

computeBlockSize is the size of the blocks to read from global and crunch.
this value should be a multiple of your work group size. I like 64 as a WG
size; it tends to perform well on most platforms. will be 
allocating 2 * float4 * computeBlockSize + uint * computeBlockSize of shared memory.
(max value for ocl 1.0 ~448, ocl 1.1 ~896)
#define computeBlockSize = 256 

__local float4[computeBlockSize] blockA;
__local float4[computeBlockSize] blockB;
__local uint[computeBlockSize] blockAnearestIndex;

now blockA gets computed against all blockB combinations. this is the job of a single work group.
*important*: only blockA ever gets written to. blockB is stored in local memory, but never changed or copied back to global

steps:
load blockA into local memory with async_work_group_copy
blockA is located at get_group_id(0) * computeBlockSize in the global vector
optional: set all blockA 'w' values to MAXFLOAT
optional: load blockAnearestIndex into local memory with async_work_group_copy if needed


need to compute blockA against itself first, then go into the blockB's
be careful to only write to blockA[j], NOT blockA[k]. j is exclusive to this work item
for(j=get_local_id(0); j<computeBlockSize;j++)
  for(k=0;k<computeBlockSize; k++)
    if(j==k) continue; //no self-comparison
    calculate distance of blockA[j] vs blockA[k]
    store min distance in blockA[j].w
    store global index (= i*computeBlockSize +k) of nearest in blockAnearestIndex[j]
barrier(local_mem_fence)

for (i=0;i<get_num_groups(0);i++)
  if (i==get_group_id(0)) continue;
  load blockB into local memory: async_work_group_copy(...)
  for(j=get_local_id(0); j<computeBlockSize;j++)
    for(k=0;k<computeBlockSize; k++)
      calculate distance of blockA[j] vs blockB[k]
      store min distance in blockA[j].w
      store global index (= i*computeBlockSize +k) of nearest in blockAnearestIndex[j]
  barrier(local_mem_fence)

write blockA and blockAnearestIndex to global memory using two async_work_group_copy

There should be no problem in reading a blockB while another work group writes the same block (as its own blockA), because only the W values may have changed. If there happens to be trouble with this -- or if you do require two different vectors of points, you could use two global vectors like you have above, one with the A's (writeable) and the other with the B's (read only).

This algorithm work best when your global data size is a multiple of computeBlockSize. To handle the edges, two solutions come to mind. I recommend writing a second kernel for the non-square edge blocks that would in a similar manner as above. The new kernel can execute after the first, and you could save the second pci-e transfer. Alternately, you can use a distance of -1 to signify a skip in the comparison of two elements (ie if either blockA[j].w == -1 or blockB[k].w == -1, continue). This second solution would result in a lot more branching in your kernel though, which is why I recommend writing a new kernel. A very small percentage of your data points will actually fall in a edge block.

share|improve this answer
    
thank you very much for your answer. It took me so long to answer it as another project came up and I didn't have time to check it. sorry about that! –  Waneck Oct 30 '12 at 17:37

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