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i am trying to write a binary number class in java .. but if i send an integer starting with 0 the number is not saved properly . i know what the problem is but i cant figure out a solution . in c++ i used a float instead of an int but in java that does not seem to work .

import java.util.*;


class BinaryNumber {

private boolean b[];


public void setBit(int index,boolean value){
 b[index]=value;
}

public boolean getBit(int index){
 return b[index];
}

public void clear(){    
    for(int i=0;i<8;i++)
    b[i]=false;
}

public BinaryNumber() {
    b=new boolean[8];
    for(int i=0;i<8;i++){
    b[i]=false;
    }   
} 

public void inputNumber(int a){

 if(a>11111111) {    
    System.out.println(" Exception Number to Large Nothing Entered ");
 }   
 else {

     int number=a;
     int c=7;
     int digit=0;

     for(int i=0;i<8;i++) {
         digit=number%10;
             if(digit==1){ 
             b[c]=true;
             }
             else if (digit==0) { 
             b[c]=false; 
             }
             else { 
             System.out.println(" Only Binary Number Accepted "); 
             clear();
             i=8; //break
             }      
         number=number/10;
         c--;       
     }   
 }  
}

public void outputNumber(){     
    for(int i=0;i<8;i++){
        if(b[i]==true){
            System.out.print("1");
        }
        else{
            System.out.print("0");
        }
    }       
    System.out.println(""); 
}

 }


class Q5{
public static void main(String args[]){

BinaryNumber a=new BinaryNumber();  
a.inputNumber(00100110);    
a.outputNumber();

BinaryNumber b=new BinaryNumber();  
b.inputNumber(00100111);
    b.outputNumber();   

}
}
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2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Numbers starting with 0 are interpreted by Java as being in octal.

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evil move by Mr. Gosling... –  Denis Tulskiy Oct 22 '12 at 4:44
2  
Well, you could a) not use leading zeroes, b) use the proper format for binary literals, c) use Integer.parseInt(String), which will always interpret its input as decimal. –  Louis Wasserman Oct 22 '12 at 4:47
1  
small warning: binary literals of form 0b0001 will only work if you're building with JDK7. –  Denis Tulskiy Oct 22 '12 at 4:51
1  
No, that'll work on any version of Java; if you want to know how it's implemented, it's pretty much the predictable traverse-over-the-String-and-accumulate-results implementation. –  Louis Wasserman Oct 22 '12 at 4:56
1  
@lfti He's just answered that. Don't just repeat yourself. –  EJP Oct 22 '12 at 5:02

There's a difference between the number itself and it's representation in the language. For instance, "0xD" (radix 16), "13" (radix 10), "015" (radix 8) and "b1101" (radix 2) are four different representations referring to the same number.

Binary Literals

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