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I have a table with over 100MM records in it. The table has a clustered index and a nonclustered index.

I can run a basic count using T-SQL on the table and it takes 1 second to run. When I put the same exact count query inside of a stored procedure it then takes 12 seconds to run.

I have looked at the execution plan for both the standard query and the stored procedure and they both are using the nonclustered index.

I am not sure why the stored procedure is so slow compared to the standard query.

I have read some stuff about reindexing in a situation like this but I am not sure why I need to do that. Also, it takes a few hours to reindex so I want to make sure that will work.

Any help on this would be great.

Thanks

UPDATE

Here is the stored procedure:

SET ANSI_NULLS ON
GO
SET QUOTED_IDENTIFIER ON
GO

ALTER PROCEDURE quickCount 

@sYID INT,
@eYID INT

AS
BEGIN

SET NOCOUNT ON;


    SELECT COUNT(leadID)
    FROM dbo.leads
    WHERE yearID >= @sYID
    AND yearID <= @eYID

END
GO

and here is the standard query:

SELECT COUNT(leadID)
FROM leads
WHERE yearID >= 0
AND yearID <= 99

I did try to run it with no parameters and the SP runs way faster (1 second). So I am assuming that it has something to do with the parameters.

share|improve this question
1  
CAn you show us a bit of the SP, doe you pass in any parameters? –  Adriaan Stander Oct 22 '12 at 4:50
    
I think you'll need to show your query and SP. –  Joachim Isaksson Oct 22 '12 at 4:50
1  
It can happen you've tried query with constants and your procedure use parameters instead of this constants. I suggest you to create SQLFiddle example or post some details about schema and query/sp –  Roman Pekar Oct 22 '12 at 4:58
1  
Do you run both against a "cold" page buffer? Or which one of the two do you run first? I would try to do DBCC DROPCLEANBUFFERS and DBCC FREEPROCCACHE before running either of the those two - does the execution time difference still occur? Or are both the same speed now? –  marc_s Oct 22 '12 at 5:18
    
Shouldn't matter afaik, but could you try the plain query with SET ANSI_NULLS ON? –  Joachim Isaksson Oct 22 '12 at 6:54

4 Answers 4

Try changing your SP to using local copies of the variables passed in.

Something like

ALTER PROCEDURE quickCount  

@sYID INT, 
@eYID INT 

AS 
BEGIN 

SET NOCOUNT ON; 
    DECLARE @Local_sYID INT, 
            @Local_eYID INT 
    SELECT  @Local_sYID = @sYID INT, 
            @Local_eYID = @eYID INT

    SELECT COUNT(leadID) 
    FROM dbo.leads 
    WHERE yearID >= @Local_sYID 
    AND yearID <= @Local_eYID 

END 

I have found before that due to Parameter Snffing, a SP can run a lot slower, but the performance returns once you use copies of the variables.

What is Parameter Sniffing ?

SQL Server : Parameter Sniffing

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the help but I had already tried that. It's not making it any faster. –  Sequenzia Oct 22 '12 at 5:09
1  
wow! thanks for that! I couldn't find the problem in my SP until I found this post! thanks a lot! –  artsylar Sep 27 '13 at 4:19
    
@Sequenzia Thanks –  USER_NAME Jul 4 '14 at 11:02

As already mentioned, this could be a parameter sniffing problem. Try including the line:

OPTION (RECOMPILE)

at the end of your SQL query.

There is an article here explaining what parameter sniffing is: http://blogs.technet.com/b/mdegre/archive/2012/03/19/what-is-parameter-sniffing.aspx

share|improve this answer

You could always try to execute it as dynamic sql:

ALTER PROCEDURE quickCount  

@sYID INT, 
@eYID INT 

AS 
BEGIN 
    SET NOCOUNT ON;

    DECLARE @SQL VARCHAR(max)

    SELECT @SQL = '
    SELECT COUNT(leadID) 
    FROM dbo.leads 
    WHERE yearID >= '+CONVERT(VARCHAR(20),@sYID)+'
    AND yearID <=   '+CONVERT(VARCHAR(20),@eYID)

    EXEC (@SQL)
END 
share|improve this answer

The first time you run the stored procedure, SQL Server will have to compile the stored procedure, which can take some time. @Astander mentioned parameter sniffing - which is a valid point, and can skew your results.

Some other factors to consider are (whilst they shouldn't really explain your symptoms):

  • You could force a locking level, e.g. WITH (NOLOCK) after the table name, which could resolve the issue (but note that you could get inaccurate results by doing that).
  • You may need to update the statistics on the table or defragment the indexes
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