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So I got this program to run, but now any numbers that I input come out as really large numerals. Do I need to add a header for math computation? Or is there something like with C, a printf function for C++?

#include <iostream>                                                     // Necessary 
using namespace std;
#define mMaxOf2(max, min) ((max) > (min) ? (max) : (min))
#define mMaxOf3(Min, Mid, Max)\
{\
     mMaxOf2(mMaxOf2((Min), (Mid)),(Max))\
}

int main()
{
    double primary;
    double secondary;
    double tertiary;
    long double maximum = mMaxOf3(primary, secondary, tertiary);

    cout << "Please enter three numbers: ";
    cin >> primary >> secondary >> tertiary;
    cout << "The maximum of " << primary << " " << secondary << " " << tertiary;
    cout << " using mMaxOf3 is " << maximum;


    return 0;
}
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1  
In addition to the answers below, your max macros are unsafe because they evaluate their arguments more than once. You should use plain functions (or perhaps function templates) instead - or use std::max. –  Mat Oct 22 '12 at 5:49
    
Aside: Mat's right in that macros should be avoided here. But, for when you do need macros, a small point: you'd be better off without the { and } in your mMaxOf3 substitution - that will work for your exact current usage, but prevents you using maximums inside expressions (for example mMaxOf3(a,b,c) + 1 might resolve to { 3 } + 1 which is a syntax error, not 4). –  Tony D Oct 22 '12 at 6:21

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The problem is that you are computing maximum before you get the user's input. Rearrange your code like this:

    double primary;
    double secondary;
    double tertiary;
    long double maximum;

    cout << "Please enter three numbers: ";
    cin >> primary >> secondary >> tertiary;

    maximum = mMaxOf3(primary, secondary, tertiary);

    cout << "The maximum of " << primary << " " << secondary << " " << tertiary;
    cout << " using mMaxOf3 is " << maximum;

Always remember that code is executed sequentially, or you may say line-by-line. For C++, any changes to variables affect the behavior of later instructions using those modified variables. In your case, you computed maximum first before you have properly set the values of primary, secondary and tertiary which are needed in mMaxOf3.

As a note, it is completely OK to have primary, secondary, tertiary and maximum have uninitialized values in the case of your program.

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Wow. Good to know I am still making newbie mistakes. Thanks for your help. –  user1728737 Oct 22 '12 at 5:54
    
@user1728737 It happens sometimes. Just remember one rule in programming: don't let the syntax (or the language) limit your creativity. –  Mark Garcia Oct 22 '12 at 5:58

This: long double maximum = mMaxOf3(primary, secondary, tertiary); needs to go just after cin >> primary >> secondary >> tertiary;

The problem you are having is that you are accessing uninitialized variables. You need to access them after you have read them in.

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You calculate the maximum before the cin statement has set the values of primary, secondary and tertiary.

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You have not initialized 'primary', secondary or tertiary before your call to mMaxOf3 so the numbers contain garbage values, hence you get garbage answers. You need to calculate the maximum after inputting the numbers. Also, have a look at std::max as a replacement for your macros

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