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Assume I have a matrix such as

[['ID', 'fName', 'lName'],
['A101', 'Mark', 'Smith'],
['A102', 'Jane', 'Smith'],
['A103', 'Mark', 'Twain'],
['A104', 'Ann', 'Lee']]

Note that some of the cells are ''

What I need to do is create 2 dictionaries from this matrix:

  1. use ID as key and fname and lname as its values
  2. use lName as key with ID and fName as values

I thought it is as simple as getting each list (since the matrix is a list of lists) and use it to pass it to a dictionary as append, but I am having a hard time writing that part.

To iterate the matrix for i in xrange (0, len(matrix)) and use i as the identifier for example matrix[i] but I am not sure if this is correct and what is the right way of making those dictionaries.

I have Python 2.7.2

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I appreciate those whom have answered, I was hoping for a more general answer than this matrix specifically. Sorry. I will play with what was given here and if I figure it out, I will post an answer myself. –  StudentOfScience Oct 22 '12 at 6:08

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted
>>> dict((x[0], (x[1], x[2])) for x in names[1:])
{'A104': ('Ann', 'Lee'), 'A102': ('Jane', 'Smith'), 'A103': ('Mark', 'Twain'), 'A101': ('Mark', 'Smith')}
>>> dict((x[2], (x[0], x[1])) for x in names[1:])
{'Twain': ('A103', 'Mark'), 'Smith': ('A102', 'Jane'), 'Lee': ('A104', 'Ann')}
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Thx! is there a way not to assume the titles or the matrix length? My example matrix is smaller and generalized to get the idea across and for others to be able to use in the future. –  StudentOfScience Oct 22 '12 at 6:06
    
No. You will have to couple code to structure at some point; this is one such point. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Oct 22 '12 at 6:07
    
thx :) can I load the first list of the matrix that has the titles and use them ? –  StudentOfScience Oct 22 '12 at 6:11
    
Sure, but that would require preprocessing. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Oct 22 '12 at 6:12
    
Thx, I am going to play with this! Appreciate your help! This website rules! and so do the great people on it! –  StudentOfScience Oct 22 '12 at 6:16

In python 2.7+, you can use dict comprehensions (which are similar to list comprehensions) to do the same thing:

>>> {ID: (fname, lname) for (ID, fname, lname) in names[1:]}
{'A104': ('Ann', 'Lee'), 'A102': ('Jane', 'Smith'), 'A103': ('Mark', 'Twain'), 'A101': ('Mark', 'Smith')}
>>> {lname: (ID, fname) for (ID, fname, lname) in names[1:]}
{'Twain': ('A103', 'Mark'), 'Smith': ('A102', 'Jane'), 'Lee': ('A104', 'Ann')}

Notice that for the case of duplicate keys, the last key in the expression will overwrite all of the others, (Here, one of the entries for "Smith" is missing). One way to fix this problem is to use a defaultdict and allow the dict values to be lists of entries, rather than individual entries:

>>> from collections import defaultdict
>>> by_lastname = defaultdict(list)
>>> for (ID, fname, lname) in names[1:]:
...     by_lastname[lname].append((ID, fname))
... 
>>> by_lastname
defaultdict(<type 'list'>, {'Twain': [('A103', 'Mark')], 'Smith': [('A101', 'Mark'), ('A102', 'Jane')], 'Lee': [('A104', 'Ann')]})
>>> 
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Thx! is there a way not to assume the titles or the matrix length? My example matrix is smaller and generalized to get the idea across and for others to be able to use in the future. –  StudentOfScience Oct 22 '12 at 6:05

From your comments on the other answers, I think this wants to be a two-step process, first getting a list of dicts instead of the "matrix" you have in your question, and then reworking it.

For completeness, let's set

list_of_lists = [['ID', 'fName', 'lName'],
                 ['A101', 'Mark', 'Smith'],
                 ['A102', 'Jane', 'Smith'],
                 ['A103', 'Mark', 'Twain'],
                 ['A104', 'Ann', 'Lee']]

So, to get the list of lists you have into a list of dicts, you can do this:

keys = list_of_lists[0]
data = [dict(zip(keys, values)) for values in list_of_lists[1:]]

data now contains a list of dictionaries.

[{'ID': 'A101', 'fName': 'Mark', 'lName': 'Smith'},
 {'ID': 'A102', 'fName': 'Jane', 'lName': 'Smith'},
 {'ID': 'A103', 'fName': 'Mark', 'lName': 'Twain'},
 {'ID': 'A104', 'fName': 'Ann', 'lName': 'Lee'}]

Now, it is simple to get the other list you want through comprehension:

[{d['ID']: (d['fName'], d['lName'])} for d in data]

I suspect you may be reading this list of lists from a file, perhaps using the csv module. If this is the case, you can read the data using the DictReader. So assuming your file looks like this:

ID,fName,lName
A101,Mark,Smith
A102,Jane,Smith
A103,Mark,Twain
A104,Ann,Lee

You can get data by doing

import csv
data = csv.DictReader(open('test.csv'))
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