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doubles seem not to work. can I only use int?
I heard that I can use C++ function templates to change this to double. I'm not sure how to go about that though.

 #include <iostream>                                                     // Necessary 
using namespace std;
#define mMaxOf2(max, min) ((max) > (min) ? (max) : (min))
#define mMaxOf3(Min, Mid, Max)\
{\
     mMaxOf2(mMaxOf2((Min), (Mid)),(Max))\
}
inline long double fMaxOf2(long double min, long double max)
{
    return max > min ? max : min;
}

inline long double fMaxOf3(long double Min, long double Mid, long double Max)
{
      return fMaxOf2(Min, fMaxOf2( Mid, Max));
    //fMaxOf2(Min, fMaxOf2( Mid, Max));     caused nan   problem      
}

int main()
{
    double primary;
    double secondary;
    double tertiary;

    cout << "Please enter three numbers: ";
    cin >> primary >> secondary >> tertiary;
    cout << "The maximum of " << primary << " " << secondary << " " << tertiary;

    long double maximum = mMaxOf3(primary, secondary, tertiary);
    cout << " using mMaxOf3 is " << maximum;

    cout << "\nThe maximum of " << primary << " " << secondary << " " << tertiary;
    long double maxim = fMaxOf3(primary, secondary, tertiary);
    cout << " using fMaxOf3 is " << maxim;

    return 0;
}

So the problem was

    inline long double fMaxOf2(long double min, long double max)
    {
        return max > min ? max : min;
    }

    inline long double fMaxOf3(long double Min, long double Mid, long double Max)
    {
        fMaxOf2(Min, fMaxOf2( Mid, Max));    // This was wrong
        // It was fMaxOf2 (fMaxOf2(Min, Mid, Max);
    }

Anyway now I get a new error... says maxim is nan... Solved it. Thanks Everyone!

share|improve this question
    
Of course it won't work, there's no types for the arguments. –  Joachim Pileborg Oct 22 '12 at 6:09
    
I originally placed double on the arguments and it didn't work. So I took it off. I know int would work, but I need double. I tried a few things before I asked this question. That is why it looks choppy. –  user1728737 Oct 22 '12 at 6:13
    
Then maybe you can say how it "didn't work"? If you get errors, then please post them in the question, otherwise we only can guess what's happening. –  Joachim Pileborg Oct 22 '12 at 6:19
    
Inline functions can be any type, just like normal functions. If it wasn't working for you with double it was because you had some other problem. –  john Oct 22 '12 at 6:23
    
Yes John, you were correct. Thanks –  user1728737 Oct 22 '12 at 6:33

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Using templates:

template<class T>
inline T fMaxOf2(T min, T max)
{
    return max > min ? max : min;
}

template<class T>
inline T fMaxOf3(T Min, T Mid, T Max)
{
    fMaxOf2(Min, fMaxOf2(Mid, Max));
}

To use the functions:

double max = fMaxOf3<double>(0.231, 123.21312, 904.4);

Now you may ask, why is that? Templates accepts, well, template arguments. T in template<class T> is the argument for the two functions. T now can be used in your functions as a "normal" type or class.

share|improve this answer
    
Wow. Nice, I wouldn't have thought of that. Thank You. –  user1728737 Oct 22 '12 at 6:11
    
@user1728737 Your welcome. I suggest you read all the good C++ books you can to sharpen your skills. See: stackoverflow.com/questions/388242/…. –  Mark Garcia Oct 22 '12 at 6:13

It is not an inline problem, you're missing type declarations for your functions. It should be :

inline double fMaxOf2(double min, double max)
{
    return max > min ? max : min;
}

inline double fMaxOf3(double Min, double Mid,double Max)
{
    fMaxOf2(Min, fMaxOf2(Mid, Max));
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yes. It's correct. Inline functions really have just the same syntax as "normal" functions (except for inline of course). –  Mark Garcia Oct 22 '12 at 6:16

Ur code in fMaxOf3 is wrong since fMaxOf2 takes only 2 arguments.

template <class T>
    inline T fMaxOf2(T min, T max)
    {
        return max > min ? max : min;
    }

    template <class T>
    inline T fMaxOf3(T Min, T Mid,T Max)
    {
        fMaxOf2(Min,fMaxOf2(Mid, Max));
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Was this meant to be a comment on an earlier answer ? –  Paul R Oct 22 '12 at 6:16
    
@Paul : why this is downvoted..this is valid answer ... –  Alien01 Oct 22 '12 at 6:17
    
It seems to be just a re-post of @Mark's earlier answer with a minor correction - it should have been a comment since it doesn't provide any new information. (I would have given it a second down-vote if I could, for use of txt-speak.) –  Paul R Oct 22 '12 at 6:19
    
@Paul: this was posted at same time with othe comment, no need to downvote it..or else leave it as it is –  Alien01 Oct 22 '12 at 6:20
    
I disagree - it's a low quality answer posted several minutes after a better answer containing identical code. –  Paul R Oct 22 '12 at 6:23

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