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I am quite new to JavaScript, and so am still coming into small things that I don't quite understand and don't seem to appear when I search for them. Please could somebody point me out what the ? : syntax is doing below.

var chCode = ('charCode' in event) ? event.charCode : event.keyCode;
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closed as not a real question by Lusitanian, vascowhite, j0k, Jocelyn, Graviton Oct 23 '12 at 14:12

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
possible duplicate stackoverflow.com/questions/1788917/… – NullPoiиteя Oct 22 '12 at 6:39
    
up vote 9 down vote accepted

This is called the ternary operator. It's a short if...else statement.

Basically, your code can be expanded to this.

var chCode;

if ('charCode' in event) {
    chCode = event.charCode;
} else {
    chCode = event.keyCode;
}
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Thanks a lot!!! – Damien Golding Oct 25 '12 at 4:33

its the ternary operator

The ?: operator can be used as a shortcut for an if...else statement. It is typically used as part of a larger expression where an if...else statement would be awkward.

var chCode = ('charCode' in event) ? event.charCode : event.keyCode;

same as

var chCode;

if ('charCode' in event) {
    chCode = event.charCode;
} else {
    chCode = event.keyCode;
}

test ? expression1 : expression2

expression1 =An expression returned if test is true
expression2 = when false

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It is typically used as part of a larger expression where an if...else statement would be awkward. How would a larger expression make an if/else "awkward"? And more importantly, how would using a ternary operator make it any less awkward? – sachleen Oct 22 '12 at 6:35
1  
@sachleen - you can't use an if/else in the middle of an expression. For assigning a variable to one of two values an if/else isn't too awkward, but you can use the ternary operator in any expression, e.g., someFunc(someCondition ? 12 : 19) or var greeting = "Hello " + (sex==="M"?"Mr":"Ms") + surname or whatever. – nnnnnn Oct 22 '12 at 6:50

Is a ternary operator.

your code instead using ? should look like

var chCode = ('charCode' in event) ? event.charCode : event.keyCode;


if('charCode' in event){
 chCode = event.charCode;
} else {
 chCode = event.keyCode;
}
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As others have said, it's a ternary.

You could make it terser with...

var chCode = event.charCode || event.keyCode;
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1  
not equivalent. charCode could be present but falsy – Jan Dvorak Oct 22 '12 at 6:35
    
@JanDvorak Just like the in could find charCode on Object.prototype. For 99.9% of cases, it's finer to use this shorter code. There is no keycode for 0 as it's a control character that can't be typed. – alex Oct 22 '12 at 6:36
    
You should not assume the browser does not set charCode to null if the key is not a character. – Jan Dvorak Oct 22 '12 at 6:39
    
@JanDvorak: jQuery seems to do just that without causing problems: github.com/jquery/jquery/blob/master/src/event.js#L465 – Blender Oct 22 '12 at 6:42
    
Given the OP seems to be asking more about what the ternary operator does than how to use key and character codes I think Jan's point is correct that || is not equivalent. But yes, for key and character codes || is a reasonable shortcut. – nnnnnn Oct 22 '12 at 6:47

Translation:

var chCode;
if ('charCode' in event) chCode = event.charCode
else chCode = event.keyCode;
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event.keyCode: Returns the Unicode value of a non-character key in a keypress event or any key in any other type of keyboard event.

event.charCode: Returns the Unicode value of a character key pressed during a keypress event.

--

LInk for event.KeyCode

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