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I want to write a byte to register with specific memory address (0x1228A432)

But, this register has a following structure:

 Bits  |   Access   |   Name   | Reset  | Description |
[31:8] | Read only  | -------- | ------ |  Reserved   |
[7:0]  | Read-write | REG[7:0] | 0xXX   | ----------- |

Please tell me, how to write a byte to this register without "touching" the Reserved bits?

EDIT1: My target is Cortex A9. I could successfully read/write to onboard DDR2 memory using 256-bit values (such as 0xFF)

EDIT2: I used to work with DDR2 memory in the following way :

// First stage
static unsigned char *p = 0;
char * argv1="0x60000000";
unsigned long address=strtoul(argv1, 0, 0);
p = (unsigned char *) argv1;

// Second stage
char * argv4="FF";
int value=strtol(argv4,0,16);

// Third stage
int offset = 9;
p[offset]=value;

EDIT3: I found out the following information:

All registers are 32 bits wide and do not support byte writes. Write operations must be word-wide and bits marked as reserved must be preserved using read-modify-write.

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4  
Is this for a microcontroller? Would ((uint8_t *)0x1228A432)[0] = 42; suffice? –  user529758 Oct 22 '12 at 6:56
1  
It very much depends on the architecture of choice. Is byte-wide access allowed? Some microcontrollers (e.g. STM32) have extra means for setting/resetting selected bits in e.g. PIO output register, without touching other bits. Let us know what's your target :) –  Code Painters Oct 22 '12 at 7:03
1  
There is no 0x1228a432 memory-mapped register in the Cortex-A9 MP. Cortex A9-Handbook What version of the A9 are you using? –  RedX Oct 22 '12 at 7:22
1  
Without knowing details about the custom board's implementation of registers and how the custom board is actually wired to the microprocessor it's almost impossible to do anything but guess at an answer here. Especially if H2CO3's answer about writing through a byte pointer doesn't work (it might be instructive to know exactly how it doesn't work). –  Michael Burr Oct 22 '12 at 8:17
1  
Code for DDR2 access is most likely irrelevant here. You need detailed information about your particular peripheral. –  Code Painters Oct 22 '12 at 8:31

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

One way to preserve bits [31:8], assuming 32-bit wide access, is to read the value, zero-out bits [7:0], bitwise-or it with the value needed and then write it back to the register.

Something like (stealing from RedX a bit ;) ):

uint8_t your_8_bit_value = 0x42;
uint32_t volatile * const mem_map_register = (uint32_t volatile *) 0x1228a432;
*mem_map_register = (*mem_map_register & 0xFFFFFF00) | your_8_bit_value;

Yet I think there should be more info available about your hardware. I've seen several datasheets saying e.g. that you have to write all 1 to reserved bits (meaning that reserved bits are reserved for future use, and 1 is a safe default), etc. So it is not always obvious, that leaving reserved bits untouched is the right thing to do.

You should find more details about your hardware - are byte-wide writes supported, are writes to reserved bits ignored perhaps, or should be all 0/1, etc.

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please check my EDIT3. –  Jake Badlands Oct 22 '12 at 11:21
2  
Hah, then the snippet provided above should do the trick! –  Code Painters Oct 22 '12 at 11:24
    
That's finally working! Thank you so much. –  Jake Badlands Oct 23 '12 at 6:34

Look up the assembler instruction handbook for an 8 bit writing instruction (not sure if it exists). If it does, use an uint8_t for your assignment to that memory location (uint8_t volatile * const reg = (uint8_t volatile * const) 0x1228a432;).

Else do what Omkant said. Overwriting the bits with the same number should not produce any unwanted results, since they are not "zeroed" before being overwritten.

His code in C (this is the verbose version for better readability):

uint8_t your_8_bit_value = 0x42;
uint32_t volatile * const mem_map_register = (uint32_t volatile *) 0x1228a432;
*mem_map_register = (*mem_map_register & 0xFFFFFF00) | your_8_bit_value;
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Just tested, and it does not work as well. Please, could you provide at least one more way of doing it? –  Jake Badlands Oct 22 '12 at 8:17
    
I used to work with DDR2 memory in the following way : 1) static unsigned char *p = 0; ---> char * argv1="0x00000008"; ---> unsigned long address=strtoul(argv1, 0, 0); ---> 2) p = (unsigned char *) argv1; ---> int offset = 9; ---> char * argv4="FF"; ---> value=strtol(argv4,0,16); ---> 3) p[offset]=value; –  Jake Badlands Oct 22 '12 at 8:21
1  
I don't think it is correct. The new_register_value in this code snippet is going to be simply 0x42, as 0xFFFFFFFF & v == v. The (*mem_map_register & new_register_value) expression has all zeros on bits [31:8], so this code is effectively resetting those bits, not preserving them. –  Code Painters Oct 22 '12 at 8:22
1  
@CodePainters Code corrected. –  RedX Oct 22 '12 at 8:29
    
@RedX please check my EDIT3. –  Jake Badlands Oct 22 '12 at 11:23
[register value] = ([register value] | [00 00 00 FF]) & [FF FF FF XX]

Here , xx is the one byte read from your given address and then set a mask of 24 bits. And perform bitwise & on the values shown above I think this should work

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2  
Why downvoted.... ? It was haivng some error but just edited it's working. –  Omkant Oct 22 '12 at 7:26
1  
I don't see any reason for the downvote. +1. –  user529758 Oct 22 '12 at 7:33
2  
Is it correct? (value | FF FF FF FF) gives all ones, then masked with FF FF FF XX, so you effectively write FF FF FF XX to the register - not exactly what OP asked for. –  Code Painters Oct 22 '12 at 8:07
1  
@CodePainters : Yes, You can do it like this .. anyway I have given just the idea of how to do this rather than providing the whole code.Since I am working on this kind of projects so I think this should work it's pretty much similar to setting and getting bits to a particular variable (here its register). –  Omkant Oct 22 '12 at 8:15
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How come? Try printf("0x%08x", (0x12345678 | 0xFFFFFFFF) & 0xFFFFFF42); - it prints 0xffffff42, confirming my previous comment - this code overwrites bits [31:8] with 1s. –  Code Painters Oct 22 '12 at 8:25

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