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We have two set of string arrays, e.g.:

string[] a = new string[] {"value1","value2","value3"};
string[] b = new string[] {"value1","value2","value3"};

I have to develop a generic method which should takes these two string arrays as parameters and should return the combined one back:

public T[] ArrayItms(T1[] a, T2[] b)
{
    return T[];
}

I got bit confused, doing so in generics.

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8 Answers 8

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You can use LINQ to do that:

public T[] ArrayItms<T>(T[] a, T[] b)
{
    return a.Concat(b).ToArray();
}

Or, doing it manually by copying the arrays:

public T[] ArrayItms<T>(T[] a, T[] b)
{
    T[] result = new T[a.Length + b.Length];
    Array.Copy(a, result, a.Length);
    Array.Copy(b, 0, result, a.Length, b.Length);
    return result;
}

In both cases, beware uninitialized paremeters (not done in the above example codes).

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Is it just me or would this fail. T1 and T2 aren't defined and aren't convertible to T –  LorenVS Aug 19 '09 at 15:26
    
Nice! There is so many nice new methods that came along to support LINQ. –  akmad Aug 19 '09 at 15:26
    
@Loren: I’ve fixed it now. Using different argument types might actually make sense, though (if they're somehow convertible into each other). I’ll leave it as it is for now and see what the OP has to say. –  Konrad Rudolph Aug 19 '09 at 15:27
    
This won't work! The compiler's gonna scream at you for not defining T1 or T2 and even then for trying to create a T array out of T1's and T2's! –  Callum Rogers Aug 19 '09 at 15:28
    
Yeah, I implemented the convertible approach in my comment –  LorenVS Aug 19 '09 at 15:28

Arrays are so 2004.

public IEnumerable<string> ArrayItms(IEnumerable<string> a, IEnumerable<string> b)
{
    return a.Concat(b);
}

You can pass your arrays to this function directly, because arrays implement IEnumerable. If you really need an array result, call .ToArray() after calling the function. Or since it's just a one-liner skip the function entirely and just call .Concat() on the first array.

Note that this is very easy to convert to a generic function that will work with any type. But so far you've only said that you care about strings.

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Best solution. +1 –  Konrad Rudolph Aug 19 '09 at 15:30

Here is a very simple implementation:

public T[] Combine<T>(IEnumerable<T> a, IEnumerable<T> b)
{
    List<T> result = new List<T>(a);

    result.AddRange(b);

    return result.ToArray();
}
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Hmm... this doesn't seem to follow proper rules for generics, your array arguments should have the same type, something like this:

public T[] ArrayItems<T>(T[] a, T[] b)
{
   return a.Concat(b).ToArray();
}

Alternatively, you could do something like this:

public T[] ArrayItems<T,T1,T2>(T1[] a, T2[]b) where T1 : T where T2 : T
{
    return a.Select(i => (T)i).Concat(b.Select(i=>(T)i)).ToArray();
}
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If both arrays are of the exact same type, you can use:

public static T[] Concatenate<T>(T[] a, T[] b)
{
    if (a == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("a");
    if (b == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("b");

    T[] result = new T[a.Length + b.Length];
    Array.Copy(a, result, a.Length);
    Array.Copy(b, 0, result, a.Length, b.Length);
    return result;
}

Otherwise

public static TResult[] Concatenate<TResult, T1, T2>(T1[] a, T2[] b)
    where T1 : TResult where T2 : TResult
{
    if (a == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("a");
    if (b == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("b");

    TResult[] result = new TResult[a.Length + b.Length];
    Array.Copy(a, result, a.Length);
    Array.Copy(b, 0, result, a.Length, b.Length);
    return result;
}

should do.

EDIT: Maybe Array.Copy() isn't that fast, so it could be benchmarked against LINQ's concat, or a strongly typed version could be custom-made.

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Edited my post to answer the question now, please remove downvote. –  Cecil Has a Name Aug 19 '09 at 15:34
    
Didn't see your answer. I deleted min. I'd just add : It works because array are covariants at runtime in C# since version 1. Compile time safety is assured by generic constraints. –  Think Before Coding Aug 19 '09 at 15:49

Do it without generics then replace each occurence of string with T.

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Since arrays are IEnumerable, you could use this: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb302894.aspx.

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You can use LINQ to do this, so you should change it to

public T[] ArrayItms<T>(T[] a, T[] b) 
{ 
     return a.Concat(b).ToArray();
}

Note you cannot combine two array of different types (T1, T2 -> T, T) and you have to use MethodName. You should call the method like:

ArrayItems<TypeName>(TypeName a, TypeName b);
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Why do you specify the generic type parameter explicitly? –  Konrad Rudolph Aug 19 '09 at 15:29

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