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I am creating an interface say 'Car'

public interface Car {
    public void drive(int Speed, int Gear ); // for cars which have gears
    public void drive(int Speed); // for cars which do not have gears
}

Now i am creating my implimentation classes say SimpleCar and AdvanceCar where

  • SimpleCar do not have gears
  • AdvanceCar have gears

Now when i write my implementation classes i am forced to code for both the methods even though i do not want them in my implementation classes

public class SimpleCar implements Car {
    public void drive(int Speed, int Gear ){ ... }; // dont want this method in SimpleCar
    public void drive(int Speed ){ ... };
}

can someone help me design my interface which has a method but the implementation classes have different signatures?

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted
public interface Car {

    public void drive(int Speed, int Gear); // for cars which have gears

    public void drive(int Speed); // for cars which do not have gears
}



public class CarAdapter implements Car {

    @Override
    public void drive(int Speed, int Gear) {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub

    }

    @Override
    public void drive(int Speed) {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub

    }

}


public class AdvancedCar extends CarAdapter {

    @Override
    public void drive(int Speed) {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub
        super.drive(Speed);
    }

    @Override
    public void drive(int Speed, int Gear) {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub
        super.drive(Speed, Gear);
    }

}


public class SimpleCar extends CarAdapter {

    @Override
    public void drive(int Speed) {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub
        super.drive(Speed);
    }


}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks , can you also tell me is @Override necessary ? – Mrinmoy Oct 22 '12 at 8:04
    
Thank you too. The @Override annotations are optional. You can remove them. The compiler will recognize them – Festus Tamakloe Oct 22 '12 at 8:51

You should have a Car interface and another one named GearCar interface which extends Car interface.

This way you can either implement GearCar or Car interface.

share|improve this answer
1  
but i would like to give only one interface to my users – Mrinmoy Oct 22 '12 at 7:49

See following design. I've removed gear from Car interface cause based on your requirements it's not valid for all cars and hence can't be part of interface.

public interface Car 
{     
    // public void drive(int Speed, int Gear ); // for cars which have gears     
    public void drive(int Speed); // for cars which do not have gears 
}

public abstract class SimpleCar implements Car
{
    public void drive(int speed) { ... }
    public abstract void accelerate(); // you can move it to interface also
}

public abstract class AdvancedCar implements Car
{
    protected int CURRENT_GEAR = 1;
    public void drive(int speed) { ... }
    public void changeGear(int gear) { ... }
    public abstract void accelerate();
}

public class Reva extends SimpleCar
{
    // provide implementation for accelerate
}

public class Ferrari extends AdvancedCar
{
    // provide implementation for accelerate
}
share|improve this answer
1  
This. Also see 'Liskov Substitution Principle' (read Uncle Bob's comment on the article 'A Square is Not a Rectangle' here: cafe.elharo.com/programming/a-square-is-not-a-rectangle – Adriaan Koster Oct 22 '12 at 7:48
    
i am sorry if i miss communicated my requirements. it is to create implementation classes that have different method signatures. the example you showed me changes the design of implementation classes to have same signature of drive method. But thanks for quick and detailed example, may be helpful to others – Mrinmoy Oct 22 '12 at 7:55
    
If you put two signatures of drive method in an interface it'll mean that every car must be driven in two ways. But that's not the case in your requirements. so you've do do these changes. – Azodious Oct 22 '12 at 8:00

Write an CarAdapter providing empty implementations of all methods in the interface. Then let your SimpleCar extend CarAdapter (which by default implements Car)

This is frequently seen in Swing applications.

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Just remove the method declaration that needs Gear because in your class you need to implement every method declared in the interface that you are implementing unless your class itself is abstract.

Also you should have your SimpleCar and AdvancedCar as abstract class if you don't want to implement any methods of the interface.

share|improve this answer
public interface Vehicle {
    public void drive(int Speed);
}

public interface Car extends Vehicle{
    public void drive(int Speed, int Gear ); 
}

public class SimpleCar implements Vehicle {
    public void drive(int Speed ){ ... };
}

public class AdvancedCar implements Car {
    public void drive(int Speed, int Gear ){ ... };
    public void drive(int Speed ){ ... };
}
share|improve this answer
    
this way i will have two interface classes vehicle and car. and i want to give my user only one interface – Mrinmoy Oct 22 '12 at 7:58
    
Yes, but you have two different things and the question was about interface design :) However, if you want one interface, just keep the one you have. And if you don't like to implement two methods in SimpleCar, let the implementation of drive method with gear parameter call the second method withou gear parameter. – Kojotak Oct 22 '12 at 8:55

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