Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I write a simple test program to produce some processor load. It will throw 6 threads and calculates in every thread pi. But the processor generates only 3 threads on the target platform (arm), the same program on a normal Linux-PC generates all 6 threads.

What is the Problem?

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <pthread.h>
#include <unistd.h>

#define ITERATIONS 10000000000000
#define NUM_THREADS 6

void *calculate_pi(void *threadID) {
        double i;
        double pi;
        int add = 0;

        pi = 4;
        for (i = 0; i < ITERATIONS; i++) {
                if (add == 1) {
                        pi = pi + (4/(3+i*2));
                        add = 0;
                } else {
                        pi = pi - (4/(3+i*2));
                        add = 1;
                }
        }

        printf("pi from thread %d = %20lf in %20lf iterations\n", (int)threadID, pi, i);

        pthread_exit(NULL);
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
        pthread_t threads[NUM_THREADS];
        int rc;
        int i;

        for ( i = 0 ; i < NUM_THREADS; i++) {
                rc = pthread_create(&threads[i], NULL, calculate_pi, (void *)i);
                if (rc) {
                        printf("ERROR; return code from pthread_create() is %d\n", rc);
                        exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
                }
        }

        for ( i = 0 ; i < NUM_THREADS; i++) {
                pthread_join(threads[i], NULL);
        }

        return(EXIT_SUCCESS);
}
share|improve this question
    
How do you know there are only 3 threads? do you get an error when running pthread_create? –  angainor Oct 22 '12 at 8:04
    
I have check with "ps -eLf" and htop. I get no error with pthread_create. –  silvio Oct 22 '12 at 8:11
1  
Works fine for me. What OS is it? Can you type cat /proc/sys/kernel/threads-max? –  angainor Oct 22 '12 at 8:25
    
That ITERATIONS fit in 32 bit? –  auselen Oct 22 '12 at 8:26
    
The target platform is a i.MX6 (arm). "cat /proc/sys/kernel/threads-max" gives me a "15100". @auselen: why shoul ITERATIONS fin in 32bit? ITERATIONS is used by a double-variable. –  silvio Oct 22 '12 at 8:37

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

When your main thread creates a new thread, depending on how many CPUs you've got and a bunch of other things, the library/OS can decide to switch to the new thread immediately and run that new thread until it blocks or terminates; then switch back to the main thread which creates another new thread that runs until it blocks or terminates, and so on. In this case you'd never have more than 2 threads actually running at the same time (the main thread, and one of the new threads).

Of course the more CPUs you have the more likely it is that the main thread will keep running long enough to spawn all of the new threads. I'm guessing that this is what is happened - your PC simply has a lot more CPUs than the ARM system.

The best way to prevent this would be to make the new threads lower priority than the main thread. That way, when the higher priority main thread creates a lower priority thread, the library/kernel should be smart enough not to stop running the higher priority thread.

Sadly, the implementation of pthreads on Linux has a habit of ignoring normal pthreads thread priorities. The last time I looked into it, the only alternative was to use real time thread priorities instead, and this required root access and creates a security/permissions disaster. This is possibly due to limitations of the underlying scheduler in the kernel (e.g. a problem that the pthreads library can't work around).

There is another alternative. If your main thread acquires a mutex before creating any new threads and released it after all new threads are created, and if the other threads attempt to acquire (and release) the same mutex before doing any real work; then you'd force it to have all 7 threads at the same time.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, the approach with the mutexes helpes! –  silvio Oct 22 '12 at 15:50

If the purpose is just to load the processors, and you have a compiler that supports OpenMP, you can use the following:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <omp.h>

double calculate_pi(int iterations) {

  double pi;
  int add = 0;

  pi = 4;
  for (int ii = 0; ii < iterations; ii++) {
    if (add == 1) {
      pi = pi + (4.0/(3.0+ii*2));
      add = 0;
    } else {
      pi = pi - (4.0/(3.0+ii*2));
      add = 1;
    }
  }
  return pi;
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {

  if ( argc != 2 ) {
    printf("Usage: %s <niter>",argv[0]);
    return 1;
  }
  const int iterations = atoi(argv[1]);

#pragma omp parallel
  {
    double pi = calculate_pi(iterations);
    printf("Thread %d, pi = %g\n",omp_get_thread_num(),pi);
  }
  return 0;
}

In this way you can set the number of iterations from command line, and the number of threads from the environment variable OMP_NUM_THREADS. For instance:

export OMP_NUM_THREADS=4
./pi.x 1000

will run the executable with 1000 iterations and 4 threads.

share|improve this answer
    
Thx for you tip, but its more the problem of only 3 threads instead of 6 threads. –  silvio Oct 22 '12 at 8:46
    
You're welcome. As in the beginning the problem seemed to be in the sleep, I thought that the automatic synchronization of OpenMP could simplify things. –  Massimiliano Oct 22 '12 at 8:51

There's nothing that guarantees you that the operating system will create as many kernel level threads/tasks as you spawn threads with pthread_create. There are pthreads implementations that will do everything in userland and only use one kernel level thread and cpu. Many (most?) implementations will do 1:1 threading where one thread is one kernel level thread because it's the simplest to implement. Some will implement M:N hybrid model where the userland library decides how many kernel level threads to spawn. This might be the case for the implementation you use. "ps -eLF" will only show you the kernel level threads, it doesn't have information about user level threads.

The advantage of M:N threading is that context switching between the various user level threads can be magnitudes faster in some cases. The disadvantage is that it's much more complicated to implement and usually the implementations are very fragile.

share|improve this answer

Maybe 1000 seconds (on the sleep) is not enough for that many iterations to finish. So the program might be exiting before the 6 threads are done.

Have you tried joining instead of sleeping?

Try replacing the sleep() for this:

for ( i = 0 ; i < NUM_THREADS; i++) {
    s = pthread_join(threads[i], NULL);
}
share|improve this answer
    
The problem is more that I have only 3 work threads instead 6. With htop and "ps -eLf" I see only 3 threads. On a normal PC it creates all 6 threads. –  silvio Oct 22 '12 at 8:14
    
I have the same issue with your code lines instead my sleep(1000). –  silvio Oct 22 '12 at 8:17
    
Do you see those threads finishing? –  imreal Oct 22 '12 at 8:18
    
Yes the threads are finished. I have changed my program, it prints now the calculated pi. All threads are executed, but some are earlier. This threads prints a curious value for pi. –  silvio Oct 22 '12 at 8:40

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.